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EPID (Epidemiology and Biostatistics)

Courses Offered by the Clinical Epidemiology Unit
of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology (MSCE) and PhD Degree Programs
Updated 02/07/2005

 

EPID 502 - Fundamentals of Medical Research II: Introduction to Biostatistics

Fall term

.75 course unit

1:45 to 3:15 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays

Maximum enrollment: 20

Instructor: Warren Bilker, Ph.D. (Fall 2004, course Instructor: Richard Landis, Ph.D.)

This course is a series of lectures designed to provide an overview of the fundamental concepts of biostatistics. Topics covered include probability, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing including nonparametric techniques, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the proper application and underlying assumptions of the methods presented. (The lectures for this course are the same lectures as for EPID 520.)

 

EPID 510 - Introductory Epidemiology

Fall term

1 course unit

Lecture: Wednesdays 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.

Discussion Section: 001 – Mondays 8:45 a.m. to 10:15 p.m.

or

002 – Fridays 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Instructor: James Lewis, M.D., M.S.C.E.

This course is a series of lecturesand workshops, designed to teach basic principles of epidemiologic research design. The course provides an overview of the types of research questions that can be addressed by epidemiologic methods. Topics covered include: definitions of epidemiology; measures of disease frequency; measures of effect and association; epidemiologic study designs, both experimental and non-experimental; and an overview of analysis of epidemiologic studies.

 

EPID 520 - Introductory Biostatistics

Fall term

1 course unit

Lectures: Tuesdays and Thursdays 1:45 to 3:15 p.m.

Lab Section: 001 – Tuesdays 3:30 to 5:00 p.m.

or

002 - Thursdays 3:30 to 5:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructor: Warren Bilker, Ph.D. (Fall 2004, course instructor: Richard Landis, Ph.D.)

This course is a series of lecturesand laboratory sessions designed to provide a working knowledge of the fundamental concepts of biostatistics. Topics covered include probability, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing including nonparametric techniques, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Emphasis in both lecturesand labs is placed on understanding the proper application and underlying assumptions of the methods presented. Laboratory sessions focus on the use of statistical software as well as provide time for review of course material. This course provides the necessary foundation for higher level biostatistics and epidemiology courses. (The lecturesfor this course are the same lecturesas for EP 502.)

 

EPID 521 - Statistical Methods for Epidemiologic Research

Spring term

1 course unit

Seminar: Tuesdays, 9:00-10:30 a.m. and Thursdays, 10:30 to 12:00 p.m.

Lab Section: Tuesdays 10:45 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. for six Tuesdays during the term.

Maximum enrollment: 30

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, and permission of instructor; access to and basic knowledge of STATA v 7.0 software

Instructor: Russell Localio, J.D., M.A., M.P.H., M.S.

This seminar focuses on statistical methods for analyzing case-control, cross-sectional, and cohort studies, and clinical trials. Topics include simple analysis of epidemiologic measures of effect; stratified analysis; ordinary linear, logistic, and Poisson regression methods; simple survival analyses including Cox regression; power and sample size calculations; confounding interaction; and the use of matching. All methods are practiced on existing data sets. Six laboratory sessions focus on the use of statistical software in epidemiologic research.

EPID 532 - Database Management for Clinical Epidemiology

Spring term

.33 course units

Section 001: Wednesdays 8:30 to 10:00 a.m. or

Section 002: Wednesdays 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructor: John Holmes, Ph.D.

This course provides students with an introduction to the techniques of database management as they apply to clinical research. Students learn how to design and implement computerized databases, perform basic query and reporting operations, migrate data between various file formats, prepare databases for statistical analysis, and perform quality assurance procedures. This course focuses on the practical issues of database management and is intended to support each student’s planned research enterprise.

 

EPID 540 - Injury and the Public’s Health

Spring term

1 course unit

Wednesdays 4:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment:15

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructor: Charles Branas, Ph.D.

This course offers students an introduction to the relatively new field of injury and violence prevention. As a major cause of death and disability throughout the world, injury is a leading public health problem. Prominent types of injuries to be discussed include those relating to motor vehicles, falls, and firearms. Behavioral, biological, economic, and social issues concerning the implementation of injury reduction policies also are emphasized through case studies of specific injury scenarios and interventions. The effect of injuries in the workplace, in the home, and during recreation also are emphasized.

The course includes guest speakers who are experts in injury prevention practice and research. Students are expected to be prepared to discuss required readings for each lecture These readings ground students in the historical and contemporary issues of the class topic at hand while also offering controversial articles to generate debate. In some cases, this debate is formalized and students are assigned to argue in favor of a particular side. Additionally, students are encouraged to complete optional readings. Each student also completes an in-class oral presentation at the end of the course on an injury subtopic of interest to the student. Students complete the course with an understanding of injuries and the many issues involved in preventing injuries.

 

EPID 542 - Measurement of Health in Epidemiology

Fall term

1 course unit

Tuesdays and Thursdays 10:30 to 12:00 noon

Maximum enrollment: 25

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Instructors: William Holmes, M.D., M.S.C.E.

This course is a series of lectures and discussion sessions designed to introduce the student to the concepts of health measurement as applied to epidemiologic studies. Topics covered include: the basics of health measurement theory; critical evaluation of the current status of health measurement in a chosen field; and techniques for developing and using measurement scales, including item analysis, validity and reliability testing, and qualitative methods.

 

Epid 550 - Clinical Economics and Clinical Decision Making

Spring term

1 course unit

Thursdays time TBD and Fridays 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m

Maximum enrollment: 30

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructors: Sankey Williams, M.D. and Henry Glick, Ph.D.

This course focuses on the application of decision analysis and economic analysis to clinical and policy research. The course begins with material about the selection, use, and analysis of diagnostic tests using two by two tables, likelihood ratios, and ROC curves. The course continues with the introduction of more general tools for decision analysis, including decision trees and other mathematical models. Special emphasis is placed on the assessment and use of utilities in these models. A major focus of the course is the application of economic principles to the evaluation of health outcomes. During seminars, students will carry out practical exercises that include problem solving, critically analyzing published articles, and learning to use computer software that facilitates decision and economic analyses.

 

EPID 560 - Issues in Research Protocol Development

Spring term

.33 course unit

Time: TBD

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructors: Dennis Durbin, M.D., M.S.C.E. and Joshua Metlay, M.D., Ph.D.

This is a seminar that focuses on major issues in research protocol development, including methodological issues regarding different research designs, development of research questions, and plans for analysis. Each student will present his or her research proposal for open discussion during one of the seminar sessions.

EPID 570 - Critical Appraisal of the Medical Literature

Spring term

.33 course units

Section 001 - Tuesdays 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.,

Or

Section 002 - Tuesdays 1:15 p.m. to 2:45

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructors: Jason Christie, M.D., and Ebbing Lautenbach, M.D., M.P.H.

This seminar focuses on techniques for critical appraisal of the medical literature. Each student will be responsible for at least one critical appraisal session covering different epidemiologic topics (including the evaluation of diagnostic tests, clinical course and prognosis of disease, disease etiology or causation, therapy, quality of clinical care, economic evaluation, and meta-analysis). For his/her session, each student will appraise critically a journal article and lead the discussion concerning that article.

EPID 575 - Introduction to Genetic Epidemiology

Spring term

1 course unit

Thursdays 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructor: Timothy Rebbeck, Ph.D.

Recent advances have made it feasible to incorporate data on potential genetic risk factors into traditional epidemiologic studies. Hence, there is an increasing need for epidemiologists to understand the genetic basis of disease, read, and interpret genetic studies, and incorporate the collection and analysis of genetic information into studies of disease etiology. The objectives of this course are to provide epidemiologists with an understanding of: 1) basic genetics, 2) the tools used by geneticists and genetic epidemiologists, and 3) the integration of genetic data into traditional epidemiologic study designs. After completing this course, students will be able to read and interpret genetic epidemiologic studies. In addition, they will be able to design epidemiologic studies that incorporate genetic data collection and analysis.

EPID 580 - Outcomes Research

Fall term

1 course unit

Thursdays 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Jeffrey Silber, M.D.

This course is divided into two main parts. The first part addresses issues related to the measurement of quality in health care. Included is a review of the classical structure-process-outcome quality paradigm. The paradigm’s strengths and limitations are addressed. This part especially focuses on outcome measures of quality, and examine the validity of alternative measures. The second part deals with observational, or quasi-experimental , research studies. It addresses the advantages and limitations of alternative designs, and covers the role of clinical risk adjustment in observational studies of medical interventions. It focuses on the problem of selection bias, and reviews recent methods for dealing with this bias, such as instrumental variables.

 

EPID 610 - Tutorial in Epidemiologic Research

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

1 course unit

Maximum enrollment: unlimited

Prerequisite: MSCE students only, permission of instructor

Instructor: Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E.and CCEB faculty

This is a tutorial given by each student’s advisor. Advisor and student meet regularly, usually weekly, throughout the first year of study. Topics include: discussion and review of epidemiologic concepts and principles, guided readings in the epidemiology of a specific health area, and the development of the research protocol. Credit for this course is awarded upon completion of a research project proposal, the one to be used to fulfill the M.S.C.E. thesis requirement, which must be approved by the student’s advisor. Evaluation is based on the grade received for the proposal.

 

EPID 611 - Advanced Study in International Clinical Epidemiology

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

.5 to 4 course units

Maximum enrollment: unlimited

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructor: Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E. and CCEB faculty

The elective provides students with an opportunity for advanced study in clinical epidemiology in an international setting. Students will make arrangements to work at one of the 27 third world clinical epidemiology units in Africa, Southeast Asia, India, and South America affiliated with the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Penn, as part of the International Clinical Epidemiology Network, or selected other sites. Working with faculty members here and there as joint preceptors, the student will join the third world unit's seminars and conferences, work through guided readings, and attend selected meetings with their third world faculty preceptor. The student may work for a limited time on one of the research projects under way in the third world unit at the time.

 

EPID 630 - Clinical Trials

Spring term

1 course unit

Seminar: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, Mondays

Maximum enrollment: 5

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalentor equivalent and EP 520 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: David Margolis, M.D., Ph.D.

This course is to serve as a general introduction to clinical trials. This course will emphasize trial design issues. This is not a course on the biostatistics of clinical trials. It is expected that at the conclusion of the course, a student will be able to plan a critical trial. Each class will consist of a two-hour Lecture: followed by a one-hour discussion. The weekly session will focus on either a group discussion of the assigned reading or on a practical application based on the material presented during the two-hour lecture. Students will be evaluated on their participation in class (20%); a clinical trial document (50%), which should include the rational for a study, study design, objectives and endpoints, sample size and analysis sections, and consent form; and a class presentation of their trial or another topic (30%).

 

EPID 632 - Medical Informatics

Summer term

1 course unit

Seminar: TBA

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructor: John Holmes, Ph.D.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major topic areas in medical informatics, especially as they apply to clinical research, and more specifically to clinical epidemiology. Through a series of lectures and demonstrations, students will learn about topics such as databases, natural language, clinical information systems, networks, artificial intelligence and machine learning applications, decision support, imaging and graphics, and the use of computers in medical education. The course materials include a text (Handbook of Medical Informatics, J. H. van Bemmel and M. A. Musen, eds.) and selected readings from the medical informatics literature appropriate for each class session. Short weekly assignments, intended to demonstrate familiarity with a given topic area, will contribute 50% of the grade. These will be hands on exercises performed using the computer and/or selected Web sites. A short paper (10-15 pages) that demonstrates the students’ ability to synthesize at least one specific topic area with clinical epidemiology will contribute to the balance of the grade.

 

EPID 634 - Clinical Trial Outcomes: Measurement, Analysis, and Interpretation

Fall term

1 course unit

Tuesdays 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment:15

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent and permission of instructor

Instructor: John Farrar, M.D.

This course is intended to teach students the skills necessary to select and/or design appropriate outcomes for a clinical trial. Students will focus on recent changes in our understanding of clinical trial outcome measurements, analyses, and interpretation for both subjective and objective phenomenon, such as adherence, use of multiple outcomes, and clinical importance. While design issues for clinical trials are the main focus, other types of clinical studies will be considered as appropriate. Students will be expected to learn about the problems inherent in the design of outcome measures of health and how to apply different epidemiologic and biostatistical concepts toward a solution. It is expected that at the conclusion of the course, students will be able to plan a clinical trial with a valid, responsive and interpretable outcome. The class will meet once weekly for a 60 minute lecture on a topic, followed by a 60-90 minute discussion of how that topic applies to the specific issues of interest of the students or the instructor. Students will be evaluated on their participation in class (25%); a paper describing the application of one of the methods to an area of interest (50%); and a class presentation of their topic (25%).

 

EPID 640 - Advanced Topics in Clinical Epidemiology

Spring semester

1 course unit

Wednesdays 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: George Macones, M.D., M.S.C.E. and Deborah Nelson, Ph.D.

This course is designed to introduce students to advanced epidemiologic methods through a series of readings and discussions. The course aims to deepen the students’ understanding of important concepts and controversies in contemporary epidemiology and to enhance their ability to think critically about empirical epidemiologic research. The course is intended for students who already are familiar with the fundamentals of epidemiology and biostatistics, and who wish to gain an understanding of the complex issues underlying epidemiologic study design and interpretation. Each week, one student will be responsible for leading a portion of the discussion of the assigned readings, in conjunction with a faculty member. Topics include: causal inference; study designs; use of large databases for research; predicting outcomes; and complex sampling methods.

 

EPID 642- Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention

Spring term

1 course unit

Fridays 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: TBD

This advanced course is a series of lecture and discussion sections designed to present advanced methods used in studies of cancer epidemiology; introduce current approaches in environmental/occupational epidemiology, genetic and molecular epidemiology, and cancer prevention; and the critical appraisal of selected topics from the cancer epidemiology literature.

EPID 644 - Cardiopulmonary Epidemiology

Summer term

1 course unit

Seminar: TBA

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E.

This is an advanced course that addresses epidemiological research issues as they apply to important clinical topics in cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine. lectures and workshops are designed to acquaint students with the classic literature in the fields of cardiovascular and pulmonary epidemiology, to use a body of literature to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of epidemiological research designs as they have been applied to cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine, to expose students to the range of topics studied, to teach advanced epidemiological principles using a problem-based approach, and to stimulate students to develop independent research questions.

EPID 646 - Reproductive Epidemiology

Spring term, (even numbered years)

1 course unit

Seminar: 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Wednesdays

Maximum enrollment: 15

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Kurt Barnhart, M.D., M.S.C.E.

This is an advanced course that addresses epidemiological research issues as they apply to important clinical topics in obstetrics and gynecology and related clinical disciplines. lectures and workshops are designed to acquaint students with seminal issues in the field of reproductive epidemiology, to use a body of literature to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of epidemiological research designs as they have been applied to obstetrics and gynecology and related clinical disciplines, to expose students to the range of topics studied, to teach advanced epidemiologic principles using a problem-based approach, and to stimulate students interested in reproductive epidemiology to develop independent research questions..

 

EPID 648 - Topics in Pharmacoepidemiology I

Fall and Spring terms, summer sessions

.33 course units

Fridays 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment:10

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H..

This is an advanced seminar course introducing students to the methods and approaches used in the field of pharmacoepidemiology, i.e., the application of epidemiologic methods to study the use and effects of pharmaceuticals. Topics range from an introduction to the utility of the field; to an overview of the different automated databases frequently used in pharmacoepidemiology research; to selected novel applications of pharmacoepidemiology, e.g., the study of beneficial drug effects, pharmacoeconomics, quality-of-life studies, and N-of-1 trials; to advanced epidemiologic methods used within pharmacoepidemiology, e.g., nested case-control studies and case-cohort studies.


EPID 649 - Topics in Pharmacoepidemiology II

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

.33 course units

Fridays 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment:10

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, EP 648 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H..

These seminars serve as follow-up to Topics in Pharmacoepidemiology I, continuing with topics presented in that course.

 

EPID 650 - Topics in Pharmacoepidemiology III

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

.33 course units

Fridays 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Maximum enrollment:10

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, EP 648 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H.

These seminars serve as follow-up to Topics in Pharmacoepidemiology I and Topics in Pharmacepidemiology II, continuing with topics presented in those courses.

 

EPID 652 - Renal and Urologic Epidemiology

Spring term

1 course unit

Seminar: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, Wednesdays

Maximum enrollment:15

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Harold I. Feldman, M.D., M.S.C.E. and J. Richard Landis, Ph.D.

The objective of this course is to prepare students to function as effective, independent researchers in the fields of renal and urologic epidemiology by providing the students an understanding of how epidemiologic research can and has advance(d) the knowledge of diseases in treatments of renal and urologic medicine. The structure of the course consists of a lecture series, accompanying workshops, and student presentations. The courses goals are: to acquaint students with some of the classic literature in the fields of renal and urologic epidemiology, to use a body of literature to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of epidemiologic research designs as they have been applied to renal and urologic medicine, to teach advanced epidemiologic principles using a problem-based approach, to expose students to the rationale of topics studied by faculty in the CCEB and the adult and pediatric nephrology and urology divisions at Penn and CHOP, and to stimulate students interested in renal and urologic epidemiology to develop independent research questions.

EPID 666 - Pharmacoepidemiology Research

Summer term

1 course unit

Seminar: TBA

Maximum enrollment:15

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent; EP 520 or equivalent; a course that covers logistic regression, such as EP 521 or equivalent; and permission of instructor

Instructor: Sean Hennessy, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

The purpose of this course is to explore and integrate concepts and considerations that are key to the conduct of pharmacoepidemiologic research. The format will be a mixture of seminar, instructor-led discussion, student-led discussion, and student presentations. Recent and classic papers from the biomedical and methods literature will be used extensively to illustrate concepts and as springboards for discussion. Topics covered include use of automated databases, pharmcogenomics, and approaches to statististical modeling.

 

EPID 668 - Research Seminar in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Spring term

.5 course units

Fridays 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon (first half of semester)

Maximum enrollment:15

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Philippe Szapary, M.D.

Course meets 3 hours per week for seven sessions

During the last decade, there has been a rising interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of CAM has been driven primarily by consumers, and is based on historical use, a holistic ideology, anecdotes of efficacy, and little data on safety. Thus, many CAM therapies lack supporting evidence from appropriately designed studies. This seminar will focus on the presentation and critique of CAM-related research projects. Each student is responsible for leading a discussion based on a review of existing literature and presentation of a brief protocol. Required readings include required texts and current literature.

 

EPID 675 - Advanced Methods for Analysis of Complex Genetic Traits

Fall term

1 course unit

Seminar: TBA

Maximum enrollment:15

Prerequisite: EP 575 or equivalent; Linear Models, Multivariate Analysis preferred; and permission of instructor

Instructor: Timothy Rebbeck, Ph.D.and Andrea Foulkes, Sc.D.

The recent explosion in the availability of molecular level data coupled with technological advancements allowing for large-scale sequencing creates an exciting opportunity to tailor treatment decisions to the specific genetic characteristics of a patient. Epidemiological studies will provide the tools to draw from this vast array of molecular data as well as well-established environmental risk factors to predict disease outcomes. However, understanding analytic methods for characterizing the complex interactions among genetic polymorphisms, biomarkers, environmental factors, and disease outcomes is imperative to draw meaningful and relevant conclusions from these studies. Through this course, students will understand and present advanced statistical methods and how they can be applied to the study of complex genetics traits.

 

EPID 680 - Causal Inference in Epidemiology: Theory and Practice

Spring term

1 course unit

Lecture/Seminar: TBA

Maximum enrollment: 10

Prerequisite: EP 510 or equivalent, EP 520 or equivalent, EP 521 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Marshall Joffe, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.

This course focuses on statistical methods for causal inference in epidemiology, and aims to show how recent ideas can be used to conceptualize problems and to analyze data in epidemiology and clinical research. The course will have two parts, dealing with the effects of simple and of time-varying treatments or exposures. The first part of the course will discuss how and when one can justify causal inference from familiar methods of data analysis and will introduce some alternative approaches. The second part of the course will deal with time varying treatments and exposures, discuss problems with some currently popular methods, and introduce alternatives. In particular, the course will look at how to estimate the effects of treatment received in randomized trials with noncompliance and in observational studies in which a confounding variable is affected by the study treatment or exposure.


EPID 710 - Research Design Consultation

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

1 course unit

Consultation Service, meeting times TBA

Maximum enrollment: 5

Prerequisite: Candidates for the Ph.D. Degree in Epidemiology only

Instructor: Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E. and CCEB faculty

Students are expected to spend at least 100 hours working with faculty on projects related to the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics’ Consultation Service.

EPID 775 - Special Topics in Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

1 course unit

Meeting times are arranged

Maximum enrollment:5

Prerequisite: EP 575 or equivalent, EP 675 or equivalent, and permission of instructor

Instructor: Timothy Rebbeck, Ph.D.

This modular course meets the needs of students who require specialized instruction and hands-on training in specific topics that are not available in a traditional course setting. Multiple modules are available, providing advanced training in specific methods in genetic and molecular epidemiology, including the possibility of laboratory rotations to obtain hands-on laboratory experience. Each student may choose up to four modules for study during the semester-long course. Each module includes readings, meetings with faculty, problem sets, laboratory analysis, or analysis of data, as appropriate.

 

EPID 800 - Research in Clinical Epidemiology

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

.5 to 4 course units

Maximum enrollment: unlimited

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

Instructor: Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E. and CCEB faculty

Working with a faculty member as a preceptor, the student will work on one of the clinical research projects underway in the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the time. In addition, the student may join the CCEB’s seminars and conferences, work through guided readings, and attend selected meetings of the faculty preceptor.

EPID 900 and EPID 990 - Masters Thesis

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

.5 to 4 course units

Maximum enrollment: unlimited

Prerequisite: Candidates for the Master's in Clinical Epidemiology Degree only

Instructor: Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E. and CCEB faculty

These are a series of tutorial sessions conducted by the student’s advisor, which are to support the student's efforts in developing a research protocol, designing a research project, and completing the study.


EPID 992 - Dissertation Research

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

.5 to 4 course units

Maximum enrollment: unlimited

Prerequisite: Candidates for the Ph.D. Degree in Epidemiology only

Instructor: Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E. and CCEB faculty

These are a series of tutorial sessions conducted by the student’s dissertation advisor, which are to support the student’s efforts in developing a research protocol, designing a research project, and completing the study.

 

EPID 999 - Independent Study in Clinical Epidemiology

Fall and Spring and Summer terms

.5 to 4 course units

Maximum enrollment: unlimited

Prerequisite: Permission of faculty required

Instructor: Stephen Kimmel, M.D., M.S.C.E. and CCEB faculty

This is a preceptorship that can be arranged with any of the CCEB faculty. The subject area and specific requirements are to be arranged as well.