BTG Hope

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Pittsburgh Projects - 2013

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Coping Skills Activity Book

Student Interns:
Colleen Moroney, University of Pittsburgh, School of Pharmacy
Roxanne Thomas, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

Academic Preceptor:
Sharon Connor, PharmD, University of Pittsburgh, School of Pharmacy

Community Preceptors:
Sharon Higginbothan, Bethlehem Haven

The Community Site:
Bethlehem Haven is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization providing a number of services including emergency shelter; transitional housing; permanent supportive housing; medical, dental, obstetric and mental health services; and employment services to women in the Pittsburgh area. The Haven also provides some medical, mental health and employment services to nonresidents, including homeless men. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Chronic Disease; Mental Health; Physical Activity and Fitness; Preparedness; Substance Abuse

The Project:
The women served by the Bethlehem Haven Women’s Shelter face many stresses in their lives as they address housing issues, medical or mental health problems, family dysfunction and financial strains. Many have developed maladaptive coping strategies in response to traumas they have faced in the past. The BTG interns’ project was intended to help the women served by the Bethlehem Haven Day Program become aware of their reactions to life stresses and to help them develop constructive coping skills to deal with those stresses. The interns created a workbook of activities and exercises designed to provide positive outlets for stress, involving art therapy, meditation and breathing, stretching and exercise, and interpersonal communication. Roxanne comments, “Bridging the Gaps has given me a much deeper understanding of the challenges faced by underserved and vulnerable populations. The classroom-style lectures and readings were important for academic learning, but the day-to-day interactions and lessons from the women at Bethlehem Haven were truly unforgettable. I know this experience will influence the way I think about and work with underserved populations as a physician someday.” Colleen notes, “To put it simply, Bridging the Gaps brings the best of real-world experiences and classroom learning together. In such a short period of time I have learned a great deal, and more importantly gained a new perspective on poverty, the health care system and society. Moving forward, my experiences in Bridging the Gaps will not only make me a better pharmacist, but a better person.”

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Anti-Smoking Ambassador Training

Student Interns:
Lawrence Tepe, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work
Leah Williams, University of Pittsburgh, School of Pharmacy

Academic Preceptor:
Ann Mitchell, PhD, RN, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing

Community Preceptor:
Jessica Schmid, Braddock Youth Project

The Community Site:
The Braddock Youth Project (BYP) is a paid eight-week summer program for youth aged 14 to 18 living within and around the Braddock community. It is a training program whose mission is to foster work skills that will help the youth advance toward positive life outcomes through meaningful and sustainable community development projects that are generated and maintained by the youth. Participants choose one of five teams: Media, BYP Jr., Gardening, Braddock Farms, and Community Center/Café. Staff members are sought out based on the skills they have to offer to the program and are employed through the AmeriCorps program, acting as valuable resources for the youth in project development. The BYP model seeks to empower the youth through their own creativity to make positive change in their community that is of interest and significance to them. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Chronic Disease; Educational Advancement/Literacy; Heart Disease and Stroke; Maternal, Infant and Child Health; Tobacco Use

The Project:
Smoking is a major health concern in Allegheny County, and individuals usually begin smoking in their teenage years. Also, asthma is a prominent disease among children and teens in the Braddock community. Inspired by BYP’s youth empowerment model, the BTG interns decided to create Anti-Smoking Ambassador Training to both prevent the youth from smoking and to encourage them to talk to their families and friends to either prevent them from starting or provide motivation to quit. Before the training sessions, the BTG interns completed a video documentary to figure out how much the youth knew about smoking and their thoughts on smoking. Using what they learned from the interviews, the interns put together an interactive training session that included a poster and “Anti-Smoking Ambassador Journals” for the youth to take notes in during the presentation. The training topics included marketing, health effects, facts about smoking and motivational interviewing. At the end of the training, the youth were provided with take-home notes of the training session. Leah comments, “Bridging the Gaps has introduced me to a whole new world of social issues within our society. It has taught me to not become discouraged by all of the issues, rather to become a hopeful cynic. I have learned how to organize my efforts in combating societal problems, to be able to identify the places on the individual, organizational and political level at which I may be able to have an impact. I have learned a great deal from my peers, and have realized that I have much more to learn about the things happening around me.” Larry notes, “The Braddock Youth Project has definitely changed me. I have learned to view youth in an entirely different way. I now see that they are more capable of doing things than adults would give them credit for, and they flourish when placed in an environment where their voices can be heard and their opinions listened to. I would never have experienced this without Bridging the Gaps. Also, through Bridging the Gaps, I have a much larger interest in public health, especially community health. … Working on our project helped me see that … the physical health of the residents in a community greatly matters in developing the neighborhood. Bridging the Gaps has been a great learning experience as well as a great experience to open my eyes to a lot of new things.”

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Food Insecurity: Three Ways to Bridge the Gap

Student Interns:
Jade Coley, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
Kelly Paulius, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work

Academic Preceptor:
Mark Friedman, PhD, MSW, MPA, University of Pittsburgh, School of Public Health

Community Preceptors:
Dina Ciabattoni, Community Human Services (CHS)
Trevor Smith, Community Human Services (CHS)

The Community Site:
Community Human Services (CHS) is a nonprofit organization in South Oakland that has served the greater Pittsburgh community for over 40 years. Its mission is to enhance people’s lives and strengthen communities by providing opportunities to develop individual potential and by delivering comprehensive services that maximize the health and well-being of those it serves. CHS has a variety of programs such as homeless assistance programs, Family Foundations Early Head Start, mental health residential programs, Wood Street Commons, health programs, Bite Café and Bite Catering. Four years ago, CHS (in partnership with the University of Pittsburgh and the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank) began the Oakland Community Food Pantry, which has grown greatly and now serves over more than 300 families per month. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Chronic Disease (Diabetes, Kidney Disease, Reparatory Diseases, etc.); Disabilities and Secondary Conditions; Mental Health; Nutrition and Weight Status; Oral Health

The Project:
The BTG interns’ project addressed the issues of food insecurity and nutrition among low-income individuals and households visiting the CHS food pantry. They had three main goals: to provide assistance and alleviate stress in planning nutritious meals with food provided by the food pantry, to foster awareness of how to grow fresh produce efficiently in urban settings, and to increase awareness of high-sodium foods in the food pantry. The interns met the first goal by creating recipe cards using mostly food pantry ingredients. The recipes feature a checklist of ingredients found in the food pantry as well as ingredients that need to be purchased. They were printed and will be displayed in the waiting area of the food pantry along with a large picture of the completed meal. They met the second goal by building a 6-foot-by-2-foot raised planter that will be used by CHS to grow produce for the food pantry customers. They met the third goal by creating magnets featuring an original character named Sneaky Salt. Sneaky Salt magnets are placed on food pantry shelves with foods that have more than 400 mg of sodium per serving, and food pantry customers will receive Sneaky Salt magnets to remind them of the six foods that contribute most to dietary sodium (breads and rolls, cold cuts, pizza, poultry, canned soup and sandwiches). Kelly notes, “I really enjoyed the amount of freedom and flexibility we had with our project. I think the organized staff at CHS contributed greatly to our success. We challenged ourselves by tackling three projects at once, and the result is a reflection of our awesome team and staff support.” Jade comments, “I really loved working in the food pantry and interacting with the food pantry customers. The smiles of the customers walking through the food pantry brought so much happiness to me, and I’m so thankful for the amazing work that the food pantry staff does each week. Seeing individuals with more bags of food that they can carry out of the food pantry each week is something that is difficult to describe. ... My experiences this summer at CHS have motivated me to learn more about ways to overcome food insecurity at both local and national levels.”

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Literacy Walk, Home Visitor Toolkit, Oral Health Kit

Student Interns:
Sara Einhorn, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
Justie Huff, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work

Academic Preceptor:
Tammy Thomas, PhD, MSW, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work

Community Preceptor:
Debbie Gallagher, COTRAIC, Early Head Start

The Community Site:
The mission of the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center (COTRAIC) is to promote the socioeconomic development of the Native American community and others who experience the same type of socioeconomic difficulties in the greater Pittsburgh metropolitan area. COTRAIC Early Head Start (EHS) provides comprehensive child development and family support services for expectant mothers and children from birth to 3 years of age. EHS works with both the caregivers and the children to identify and address possible developmental, environmental and mental health issues. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Educational Advancement/Literacy; Environmental Health; Nutrition and Weight Status; Oral Health; Physical Activity and Fitness

The Project:
The population at Early Head Start consists of families at or below the poverty line with children from birth to age 3. The BTG interns’ project had three parts: a literacy walk, a home visitor toolkit, and oral health kits. The literacy walk, which addressed an EHS requirement to conduct literacy-focused socializations throughout the year, consisted of a group book reading with associated activities as well as a free goodie bag of books and developmental information. The home visitor toolkit addresses topics in nutrition and environmental health identified by the home visitors as benefiting from more attention in the homes, based on observations and requests from parents. The toolkit is intended to serve as a resource for the home visitors so that they can access and copy easy-to-read information for the families as they see fit. The oral health kits provide each family with oral health supplies and quick educational tips. These kits include toothbrushes, toothpaste, floss, oral health coloring sheets and quick facts. The kits were distributed at a socialization event that included an oral health educational session about brushing teeth. Sara notes, “Bridging the Gaps has provided me with an experience unlike anything I’ve had before. It has opened my mind to new ways of thinking about persistent societal issues and disparities. It has opened my heart to new populations I might have otherwise not had a chance to interact with. It has allowed me to better understand the complex nature of social determinants of health and inspired me on a new level to want to change the status quo.” Justie comments, “This experience with Bridging the Gaps has broadened my understanding of underserved populations. … BTG has challenged me not only professionally, but also personally. … It pushed me outside of my box, outside of my comfort zone, and into a greater understanding of self and the people and communities around me.”

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Hilltop Community Children’s Center

Student Interns:
Megan Handwerk, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing
Cameron Needle, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health

Academic Preceptor:
Jonathan Pletcher, MD, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Deborah Gallagher, COTRAIC, Hilltop Community Children’s Center

The Community Site:
The mission of the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center (COTRAIC) is to promote the socioeconomic development of the Native American community and others who experience the same type of socioeconomic difficulties in the greater Pittsburgh metropolitan area. The Hilltop Community Children’s Center assists working families with children from birth to age 8. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Access to Health Care; Educational Advancement/Literacy; Health Literacy/Communication; Injury and Violence Prevention; Maternal, Infant and Child Health

The Project:
The BTG interns addressed the issues of child illness and literacy. They wrote and illustrated a children’s book that described the experience of a child who wakes up feeling ill. The book is designed for parents to read to their children while educating families about the processes that are involved in identifying and caring for a sick child. Interns also developed a Hilltop parent handbook that highlighted some of the most common childhood diseases and what to expect if a child has an illness. Lastly, interns created training modules for staff, focusing on stress management to help decrease staff burnout and information about autism to help identify and encourage intervention in children who are suspected to be autistic. Megan remarks, “My experience with Hilltop Children’s Community Center made me step out of my comfort zone and see some of the challenges that exist out in the community, especially among families with young children. There were plenty of obstacles along the way, but overall it was a beneficial eye-opener. My understanding … will make me a more knowledgeable and compassionate nurse.” Cami comments, “My experience with Bridging the Gaps allowed me to challenge myself in a way I didn’t know was possible. I met fantastic people, made new friends and learned several important lessons about the professional world and nonprofit management. I really enjoyed getting to better understand the problems that young families and their children face.”

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YEAH! (Youth Expression Through Art, Hooray!)

Student Interns:
Laura Ellen Ashcraft, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work
Mohini Dasari, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

Academic Preceptor:
Martha Ann Terry, PhD, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health

Community Preceptors:
Lyndsey Sickler, The Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh (GLCC)

The Community Site:
The Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh (GLCC) provides lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals, their families and supporters in western Pennsylvania with resources and opportunities to promote visibility, understanding and equality within the LGBT communities and the community at large. The GLCC works toward these goals through education, social support, networking and advocacy and is part of the Service Access to Youth Collaborative. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Access to Health Care; Educational Advancement/Literacy; Health Literacy/Communication; Responsible Sexual Behavior

The Project:
The BTG interns’ primary project was to promote youth expression through artistic mediums, including drawing and writing. Youth at GLCC were encouraged to express their views on a series of questions to guide the GLCC on program development. Each week a new prompt was posted in the main lobby with a large role of white paper on which the youth could respond and participate. BTG interns coded the art that emerged in response to these questions to provide the GLCC board and staff with a compilation of themes and suggestions for future direction based on the youths’ responses to these questions. They also created a video to share the results from this project and to promote visibility and awareness about the GLCC and its services. Additionally, they created a resource binder that covered an array of topics, from finding housing to health care access, based on the needs observed in interactions with youth at GLCC. Mohini comments, “Through my experience as a Bridging the Gaps intern at the GLCC, I have had the opportunity to learn so much about the LGBTQIA community, as well as youth experiencing unique situations such as homelessness and pregnancy. I feel much more competent now in discussing and understanding LGBTQIA issues, as well as interacting with and understanding youth living in at-risk situations. The experiences and interactions I have had this summer have further honed my understanding of how important it is to promote safe community spaces, such as the GLCC, as well as promoting awareness and education about local resources and health information.” Laura Ellen remarks, “Bridging the Gaps has been a growing and insightful experience for me. I have learned a lot about the LGBTQIA population and their needs. I never realized the amount of culture, history and even language that goes along with people who identify as LGBTQIA. I also did not realize the extent to which health disparities affect this community. Through working with the GLCC and the BTG program, I have learned more about the LGBTQIA community and expanded my thinking to include gender-neutral language. I have very much appreciated the opportunity to learn from the staff, volunteers and participants at the GLCC.

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Empowering the Girls at Gwen’s Girls

Student Interns:
Lisa Ripper, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health
Janelle Whitney, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

Academic Preceptor:
Elizabeth Miller, MD, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Lynn Denise McGill, Gwen’s Girls

The Community Site:
Gwen’s Girls was founded in 2002 by former Pittsburgh Police Commander Gwendolyn J. Elliott, who noticed the plight of girls and young women in high-risk populations and the lack of services to meet their complex needs. The mission of Gwen’s Girls is to empower girls and young women to have productive lives through holistic, gender-specific programs, education and experiences. Gwen’s Girls offers services for girls aged 8 to 21, including foster care, after-school programs, summer camp, prevention, reunification and the group home. Gwen’s Girls Group Home consists of girls aged 13 to 21 who have been court ordered for placement. This group home is the only home in Allegheny County that provides specific services for pregnant and parenting teens. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Health Literacy/Communication; Maternal, Infant and Child Health; Mental Health; Nutrition and Weight Status; Physical Activity and Fitness

The Project:
While working at Gwen’s Girls Group Home the BTG interns addressed the quality of food, incorporated activities and created a pregnancy and parenting handbook. For the food portion of the project, they cooked healthy lunches to share with the girls; created a sample menu with simple changes that were healthier, cheaper and more “WIC friendly”; and recommended that Gwen’s Girls look into hiring a cook to cook nutritious meal for the girls. The BTG interns also involved the residents in activities such as crafts, outside games and Wii games. The pregnancy and parenting handbook they created contains six major sections that are filled with best-practices information about topics recommended by the staff. The handbook will serve as a resource guide for both girls and staff to develop a better standard of care within the home and will be incorporated into a larger parenting program. Lisa remarks, “BTG allowed me to challenge myself and work with a population I did not know too much about. It was sometimes hard and difficult work, but it reaffirmed what I feel is my purpose: to work with vulnerable populations. I learned that everyone has a story. It’s so important for health professionals to slow down and ask about their clients’ or patients’ lives — we might just be surprised by what we find. I appreciated that BTG provided a supportive environment to question, learn and explore different attitudes, beliefs and ideas.” Janelle notes, “The [BTG] program this summer has been a great opportunity for me to learn how to more effectively help underserved populations. We were taught to sit down with our population and ask, ‘Tell me what you need.’ I was surprised both by how simple it was and how well it’s worked. I always thought that change didn’t happen because it was hard, but it’s not, and Bridging the Gaps has inspired me to continue this simple work for change in my future career.”

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First Annual Hazelwood Community Cookout/Health and Safety Fair

Student Interns:
Melanie Parker, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing
Jennifer Sloan, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health

Academic Preceptor:
Tracy Soska, MSW, LSW, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work

Community Preceptor:
Kirsten Raglin, Hazelwood YMCA

The Community Site:

The mission of the Hazelwood YMCA is to strengthen the community by providing a safe space as well as recreational, educational and social services. The programs at the YMCA include after-school programs, summer camp, community lunch, food pantry, farm stand and free tax preparation. Through these programs, the Hazelwood YMCA instills hope and empowers change in the lives of its members. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Access to Health Care; Chronic Disease (Diabetes, Kidney Disease, Respiratory Diseases, etc.); Nutrition and Weight Status; Oral Health; Preparedness

The Project:
The goal of the BTG interns’ project was to target issues of access to health care and healthy food. To have an impact on the broader community, the interns chose to put on an event that brought the community to them. They accomplished this by organizing the First Annual Hazelwood Community Cookout/Health and Safety Fair, featuring representatives from Bike Pittsburgh, Fire Safety and Prevention, COTRAIC Early Head Start, the American Diabetes Association, the American Red Cross and Grow Pittsburgh, and students from the University of Pittsburgh’s schools of pharmacy, dentistry and nursing. The event provided free health resources, health screenings, a free nutritious meal and a fun environment. Around 125 people benefited from the event. Additionally, the interns left a planning guide with the Family Resource Coordinator at the Hazelwood YMCA, and organizing the event was added to their job description to ensure that it occurs annually. Jenn notes, “I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to serve at the Hazelwood YMCA as a BTG intern. What I will take away most from this experience is the understanding that people’s behavior may be influenced by the events and environments you may never know anything about. I was floored by how helpful, welcoming and kind the people of Hazelwood are, and by the outpouring of support from the BTG community to put on our event. This experience was confirmation that I want to continue to work on issues of health equity in underserved populations.” Melanie remarks, “This experience has shown me the value of understanding the social determinants of health in order to better educate a person, which is something that is rarely discussed in nursing school. It has taught me that self-empowerment is the key to change and that the strength of a community is not determined by the wealth of its members but the passion they have to make a difference. Serving the community of Hazelwood was truly a privilege, and my experiences there have taught me far more than I could have ever learned in a university or hospital setting.”

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McKeesport Community Resource Guide

Student Interns:
Elise Gamertsfelder, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing
Jessica Hayes, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work

Academic Preceptor:
Emma Barinas-Mitchell, PhD, MPH , University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health

Community Preceptor:
Megan Flanagan, McKeesport YMCA

The Community Site:
The YMCA of McKeesport of McKeesport is the leading nonprofit for youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. The Y works side by side with neighbors every day to make sure that everyone, regardless of age, income or background, has the opportunity to learn, grow and thrive. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Access to Health Care; Educational Advancement/Literacy; Health Literacy/Communication; Nutrition and Weight Status; Physical Activity and Fitness

The Project:
The BTG interns created a community resource manual to highlight the limited resources that are available in the McKeesport area. The city of McKeesport is a very vulnerable community; approximately 40 percent of the population is living at the poverty level. Due to the decline of the steel mill industry, once vital to the economy, McKeesport as a community is suffering. Many of the services and resources that were once provided in McKeesport are no longer in existence. The purpose of the interns’ project was to present community members with accessible and accurate information regarding the services still available in the community. The resource manual allowed residents to address their needs, alleviate daily stressors and engage the community. To launch the resource manual, the interns hosted two open houses for the YMCA, advertising its new location, giving tours of the facilities and supplying information about the various programs the Y has to offer. To ensure that the resource manual endures, the interns left the YMCA staff an electronic copy that they can edit whenever services or contact information changes. Elise comments, “It has been drilled into my head since the first day of nursing school that I need to deliver quality, patient-centered care. The best way to do that is to truly understand the circumstances that each patient is coming from, and my Bridging the Gaps placement in McKeesport has allowed me to do just that. From playing many different roles throughout the course of the summer — child caretaker, geriatric nurse and community surveyor to name a few — I have been able to experience poverty and understand what one must go through just to meet the demands of daily life. The interdisciplinary reflective sessions have also helped to deepen my appreciation of how poverty permeates into every aspect of life, and the insurmountable obstacles that must be overcome.” Jessica remarks, “When I found out that I was going to be interning in McKeesport for Bridging the Gaps, I could do nothing but laugh. McKeesport is a place that I am very familiar with, a place where my family resides and a place I call home. However, going into this internship, I was now looking through a different lens. It did not take long for me to see and understand the disparities that so many people there face. … Without access to resources, people are bound to fail and their children will suffer.”

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Parenting Through Recovery Curriculum

Student Interns:
Taylor Maffett, University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing
Glory Ojiere, University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health

Academic Preceptor:
Rachel Fusco, PhD, MSW, University of Pittsburgh, School of Social Work

Community Preceptor:
Sharon Jones, Sojourner House

The Community Site:

Sojourner House is a residential drug and alcohol treatment facility for addicted women and their children. Sojourner House believes that mothers can recover from their addiction best when surrounded by what they love most: their children. Sojourner House can house up to 14 families with up to three children each, aged 12 or younger. Sojourner provides all in-house treatment including counseling, group therapy, parenting education and life-skills training. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Health Literacy/Communication; Maternal, Infant and Child Health; Mental Health; Nutrition and Weight Status; Preparedness

The Project:
The clients at Sojourner are mothers recovering from addiction who are learning to parent soberly and reconnect with their children. Most of the women have spent many years in addiction, have neglected their roles as mothers and lack many life skills. The BTG interns found that a big need at Sojourner was a better-defined parenting curriculum. The interns’ project was a parenting curriculum book for both the staff and the clients to use during parenting classes. They asked the staff what topics they felt the women needed the most education on. The weekly lesson plan topics include sick child care, child safety tips, developmental milestones, understanding emotions and talking to your child about addiction. The booklet contains discussion materials, handouts and activities. Taylor notes, “Bridging the Gaps has taught me a new respect for every part of the health care system. We are all necessary to make positive change within the community … and everyone deserves the same respect and the same opportunities as the next. It has opened my eyes to the endless struggles people face in this world and the determination, persistence, courage and support it takes to overcome them. BTG has trained me to look at the whole picture — to not just look at the disease or diagnosis, but to really get to know one’s story.” Glory remarks, “If there is one thing that I take from Bridging the Gaps, it is the recognition that all positive, ‘productive’ members of society are privileged in some way, and I am humbled by that knowledge. I learned that being privileged is more than money or physical resources. It can also be about being raised in an environment that fostered support, stability and safety. We need to be sensitive to the fact that everyone does not grow up with the same privileges and try to meet people where they are, believing that all people deserve respect and opportunities. BTG taught me that though I may not be able to save the world, I can be a key player in improving my community.”

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"My internship … has affected me deeply. I have learned about the complexities of substance abuse and the struggles women face to remain clean. Working with a student from a discipline other than my own has helped me to view health issues from another perspective."
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