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Philadelphia Consortium Projects - 2013

Adolescents & Young Adults

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Preparing North Philadelphia’s Teen Population for a Healthy Future

Student Interns:
Marissa Goldberg, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program
Marc Wagner, University of the Sciences, Doctor of Pharmacy Program

Academic Preceptors:
Ronald Allen, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Oliver Bullock, DO, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Mary Kate McGinty, RPh, MS, University of the Sciences

Community Preceptor:
Jacques Louis, MSEd, Allegheny West Foundation

The Community Site:
The mission of the Allegheny West Foundation (AWF), located in North Philadelphia, is to improve the quality of life in the AWF community by providing resources to the neighborhood, specifically youth education and employment. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Chronic Disease (Diabetes and Hypertension); Heart Disease and Stroke; Nutrition and Weight Status; Oral Health; Physical Activity and Fitness

The Project:
The BTG student interns created a health promotion and education program for the adolescents participating in Philadelphia’s WorkReady program, which introduces high school students to the workforce. The sessions included seminars on cardiovascular health, adolescent obesity (particularly related to chronic disease), nutrition, professional etiquette and physical activity. Using a roundtable format to maximize effectiveness, interns created seminars that consisted of icebreakers, didactic lessons, small group discussions and entertaining activities. In addition to providing information on healthy living, the interns also worked to prepare the adolescents for the future in terms of writing résumés and going on interviews. Marissa notes, “BTG CHIP has been an enriching summer experience that has impacted the person I am today. From this experience, I have had the invaluable opportunity to work with someone from another health care field to best educate the high school students living in North Philadelphia on health concepts and on leading healthier lifestyles. It was quite eye-opening to see the lack of resources and information that exists in North Philadelphia just several miles from where I reside. My experience this summer has only further cemented my aspirations to work in an underserved urban population as a physician so that I may help others, like the students I worked with, live healthier and productive lives.” Marc says, “Bridging the Gaps provides an opportunity to grow personally and professionally. Working as part of an interdisciplinary team helped me realize the importance of working with others. After being immersed in North Philadelphia’s community, I became appreciative of the cultural differences and similarities between those I served and myself. Working with adolescents that come from a different background than I proved to be a very rewarding summer experience.”

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Creating Safe Space and Promoting LGBTQ Awareness: Celebrating 20 Years of The Attic Youth Center

Student Interns:
Lynsey Daniels, Drexel University College of Medicine
Victoria Vitale, Drexel University, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Creative Arts in Therapy

Academic Preceptor:
Anthony Rodriguez, MD, Drexel University College of Medicine

Community Preceptors:
Jacinto Grant, MSW, The Attic Youth Center

The Community Site:
The Attic Youth Center, located in Center City Philadelphia, strives to create opportunities for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) youth and their allies to develop into creative, healthy, independent and civic-minded adults. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Mental Health; Nutrition and Weight Status; Physical Activity and Fitness; Responsible Sexual Behavior; Substance Abuse

The Project:
The BTG student interns worked with the young people enrolled in the WorkReady program to facilitate the completion of their projects celebrating the 20th anniversary of The Attic. Responsibilities included co-facilitating a youth group, documenting the young people’s work for the end-of-the-summer Expo, and participating in creating a safe and welcoming space. The interns also facilitated a weekly group session, Wellness Matters, that addressed health-related issues suggested by the youths themselves. Additionally, the interns acted as extra support during evening drop-in hours. Lynsey notes, “My BTG CHIP experience at The Attic has made me realize the importance of being present and comfortable in a space to facilitate the open sharing of personal stories. Until this experience, I was unaware of how providing support for someone could rely so much on personal interactions. I believe that this experience will carry into my professional career and allow me to better serve my patients by being more aware of myself in a space with others.” Victoria comments, “Over the course of this summer program, The Attic has instilled in me a deeper understanding of cultural humility. It has been fascinating to learn the unique histories of the youths at The Attic through our weekly group, Wellness Matters. I will apply what I have learned to my clinical music therapy work because it is an inherently person-centered approach to health care.”

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Bartram Healthy Lifestyles Initiative

Student Interns:
James Barrett, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program
James Seternus, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program

Academic Preceptor:
Ronald Allen, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Oliver Bullock, DO, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

Community Preceptors:
Anthony Singleton,John Bartram High School

The Community Site:
John Bartram High School, located in Southwest Philadelphia, provides a Summer Bridge Program for incoming 10th-grade students. The students are chosen for the program based on their high academic standing and creativity. The program incorporates information about healthy lifestyles and wellness education into the curriculum. The program seeks not only to educate the students about healthy lifestyles but to also prepare the students for future careers and education. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Chronic Disease (Diabetes, Kidney Disease, Respiratory Diseases, etc.); Educational Advancement/Literacy; Heart Disease and Stroke; HIV; Injury and Violence Prevention; Nutrition and Weight Status

The Project:
The BTG student interns developed a summer program for incoming 10th-grade students attending John Bartram High School. The program focused on various health-related subjects including nutrition, heart disease, smoking, drug use, obesity, gun violence and bullying. The program also educated the adolescents on preparation for college and postsecondary vocational school. They were required to complete a project in which they researched a possible career of interest and then developed a plan to reach that career. James Seternus notes, “One of the greatest lessons of this program is the enormous challenges to learning and health that is posed to low-income areas such as Southwest Philadelphia. By overcoming such challenges we, as educators, can help reach those willing to learn. I am very happy with the progress and experiences I have had with the students of Bartram, and I am confident many of them will achieve the goals they’ve set before themselves.” James Barrett says, “For me, this summer has been about helping our students realize their futures. We’ve worked with them to construct road maps, detailing the paths they need to take to get where they want to be in life. Ironically, despite all the lessons I’ve given to them, I’m certain they have taught me just as much. From patience and understanding to being comfortable laughing at myself, these kids have forced me to look at myself in new, challenging ways.”

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Preventing Violence, Promoting Health

Student Interns:
Rebecca Wood, University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy and Practice
Hao-Hua Wu, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

Academic Preceptors:
Zvi D. Gellis, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy and Practice
Eric Goren, MD, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

Community Preceptors:
Jacqui Bowman, PhD, College of Physicians of Philadelphia
Jon Goff, College of Physicians of Philadelphia

The Community Site:
The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, located in Center City, is the oldest professional medical organization in the United States. Its mission is to advance the cause of health while upholding the ideals and heritage of medicine. Among its many outreach efforts are the Karabots Program and the Teva Program, both of which focus on the personal and professional development of Philadelphia high school students. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Educational Advancement/Literacy; HIV; Injury and Violence Prevention; Mental Health; Substance Abuse

The Project:
For the first week of the project at the College of Physicians, the BTG student interns created posters for the HIV Testing Day hosted by the Hip2Know Initiative. These posters educated community members about how to prevent HIV transmission and directed participants to the appropriate resources. The BTG interns also helped to set up a trauma documentary workshop with filmmaker Sixx King as an orientation for students involved in the Teva Summer Internship program. The interns then spent the ensuing weeks as teachers and mentors for the students. They developed a lesson plan to teach positive coping strategies for stress and trauma, led a classroom discussion about how the cycle of violence is perpetuated, and implemented a lesson plan to educate students about prevention of sexual violence and domestic abuse. Rebecca states, “The past few weeks spent with the high school students have been educational, enlightening and inspiring. Each day, the students teach me something about resilience and strength. We have shared stories, made lasting memories through a documentary film project and learned about the building blocks for a healthy community. I feel privileged to have had the chance to meet these kids and offer support for their experience as part of this program.” Hao-Hua notes, “My experiences with Bridging the Gaps will enable me to provide more conscientious and holistic care to the patients in my community. It has been both inspiring and sobering to work with the high school students of the Teva Summer Internship. On one hand, it is uplifting to hear how resilient the students are despite having to endure violence in their communities and physical and sexual abuse in their homes. It is difficult, however, to learn about the lack of educational, medical and social resources available to these students as a result of their socioeconomic status and area of residence. Thus, I have come to realize the importance of recognizing and addressing the systemic inequities inherent in society as a pathway towards achieving better patient outcomes.”

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Promoting Safe Corridors Through 21st-Century Media

Student Interns:
Daniel Coke, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine
Emily Evron, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College

Academic Preceptors:
Rickie Brawer, PhD, MPH, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College
Joan I. Gluch, PhD, RDH, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine

Community Preceptors:
Eric Williamson, EducationWorks

The Community Site:
EducationWorks is a nonprofit organization that provides programs that enrich urban school environments and extend opportunities for learning. EW engages students in activities outside of school and inspires them to solve conflicts productively, giving them a positive outlet for their creativity. These programs allow students to explore and expand their own unique talents, encouraging them to take greater responsibility for themselves, their school and the wider community. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Educational Advancement/Literacy; Heart Disease and Stroke; Injury and Violence Prevention; Oral Health; Preparedness

The Project:
BTG student interns working at the EducationWorks WalkSafePHL/Safe Corridors program at the John H. Taggart Elementary School in South Philadelphia provided support to adolescents in the WorkReady program. They assisted in media editing, facilitated debates and directed team-building activities. As supervisors for the Safe Corridors program, interns conducted a walkability audit to assess the local community. In addition, they planned trips to the Mütter Museum and the Freedom Theatre for enrichment. The interns also presented on cardiovascular disease and oral health and led discussions about the importance of maintaining a balanced diet and exercising regularly. Dan remarks, “Bridging the Gaps opened my eyes to the tremendous diversity in South Philadelphia. My experiences this summer have taught me to appreciate the cultural, ethnic, racial and religious diversity in our society and the value of being able to work with all types of people and personalities. I have learned that respect and trust lie at the foundation of all healthy relationships and there is no universal template for working well with others; each relationship must be uniquely tailored and versatile, and have two-way communication. The skills that I have developed through BTG will serve me well both in school and in practice as a dentist, as I collaborate with diverse faculty, students, patients and health care teams to provide quality care.” Emily notes, “This summer with the BTG CHIP program had a huge impact on my knowledge of the city in which I live and train for my future profession. I learned about and built relationships with a community very different from the one in which I grew up. I found that by fostering trusting, open interactions and relationships, I could successfully work together with people of ages, cultures, races and backgrounds of a wide diversity. This summer was extremely meaningful to me, and I will take my experiences with me throughout the continuation of my career.”

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Safe Corridors

Student Interns:
Kevin Amiri, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program
Megan DiNapoli, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program

Academic Preceptors:
Ronald Allen, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Oliver Bullock, DO, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Joseph Brand, EducationWorks, WalkSafePHL

The Community Site:
EducationWorks is a nonprofit organization that provides programs that enrich urban school environments and extend opportunities for learning. EW engages students in activities outside of school and inspires them to solve conflicts productively, giving them a positive outlet for their creativity. These programs allow students to explore and expand their own unique talents, encouraging them to take greater responsibility for themselves, their school and the wider community. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Chronic Disease; Heart Disease and Stroke; Oral Health; Physical Activity and Fitness; Responsible Sexual Behavior

The Project:
BTG student interns working at EducationWorks WalkSafePHL/Safe Corridors at Overbrook High School worked with the students to create a publicity campaign to promote safety within their community. As part of the WalkSafePHL campaign, the interns helped students become advocates for the program. In addition, the interns gave a series of lectures promoting healthy lifestyles and choices. Kevin notes, “I have learned how to better relate with people of different socioeconomic and racial backgrounds than me through this seven-week program. I have gained a great understanding of the social problems which affect the city of Philadelphia.” Megan states, “As part of the Bridging the Gaps community, I believe I’ve grown in my ability to not only recognize the various social and economic factors that impact a person’s health, but a willingness to explore those areas with my future patients in order to better treat them. When we first started working here, I felt like the students were speaking a foreign language that I couldn’t (and would never) understand. As the weeks went on, I discovered that they were only too happy to explain things to me when they realized that I have genuine interest in what they have to say. I’m deeply honored that students who have only known me for a few weeks are willing to share their stories with me.”

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Exploring Health Through Self-Expression

Student Interns:
Michael Tedaldi, Temple University, School of Medicine
Emily Wishnick, Temple University, College of Health Professions and Social Work, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Occupational Therapy Program

Academic Preceptor:
Dianne Butera, MSW, Temple University, School of Medicine

Community Preceptors:
Diane Leslie,Freedom Theatre
Patricia Scott-Hobbs,Freedom Theatre

The Community Site:
Freedom Theatre is a performing arts training program in North Philadelphia that provides serious training in the arts. Its summer program empowers students aged 5 to 18 to become artists, advocates of the arts and productive members of society. Freedom Theatre integrates community issues into its curriculum and connects local youth organizations to explore these issues in a safe space. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Adolescent Health; Heart Disease and Stroke; Nutrition and Weight Status; Physical Activity

The Project:
The BTG student interns integrated health and nutrition education into lunch sessions with the youth attending the Freedom Theatre summer program. They also helped with organizational outreach efforts; assisted in a range of activities from mentoring students to participating in various classes; and helped to plan, organize and facilitate a bullying conference for area youth. Part of their summer experience included participating in the production of a documentary short that shed light on Freedom’s rich history and important role in the North Philadelphia community as well as its impact on the lives of the students and staff. Emily comments, “This summer at Freedom Theatre afforded us the opportunity to work with Philadelphia’s youth regarding their overall health and well-being. We saw firsthand how Freedom Theatre trained young artists in their craft and prepared them for the challenges of adult life.” Michael remarks, “We would like future members of Bridging the Gaps to know that this is a great site in which to interact with and get to know the youth of North Philadelphia. Freedom Theatre has a very rich history and very important role in this community as a place where kids can feel safe, be themselves and explore a wide range of topics by honing their skills as young artists.”

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Building Futures One Student at a Time

Student Interns:
Jeu-Hee Hahn, Drexel University College of Medicine
Gulnar Mangat, Drexel University College of Medicin
Sina Memari, Drexel University College of Medicine

Academic Preceptor:
Vincent Zarro, MD, PhD, Drexel University College of Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Zeva Levine, EdM, Philadelphia Futures

The Community Site:
Philadelphia Futures provides academic and social resources for high-potential, economically disadvantaged, college-bound students in the Philadelphia school district. It provides low-income students who will be the first generation in their families to attend college with rigorous academic programs and resources to support them through high school and college. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Educational Advancement/Literacy; Environmental Health

The Project:
The BTG student interns were divided among three programs associated with the Philadelphia Futures summer curriculum: Temple Futures Entrepreneurship and Creative Writing, Eastern Futures in Environmental Science and Drexel Futures. The interns worked with rising high school seniors, juniors and sophomores. The interns assisted the respective instructors of the three programs through classroom assistance, assignment grading, grade-book entry, student mentoring and field trip planning. In addition to the separate programs, interns acted as SAT tutors in one-to-one sessions and also supervised study halls. Gulnar notes, “Participating in BTG this summer was a truly gratifying experience. My site allowed me to interact with the youth of Philadelphia and helped me gain a lot of insight into working with adolescents. We navigated some fairly heavy topics together, like the role of racial and ethnic tensions in historical events such as the Holocaust, and it was quite satisfying to see them grow over the course of the class. I also particularly enjoyed working one-on-one with a handful of students on their SAT skills. This gave me a great opportunity to get to know them better and learn more about the difficulties they face on their path to higher education. I definitely feel I gained as much, if not more, from the students as I gave to them!” Jeu-Hee comments, “This experience with Bridging the Gaps and Philadelphia Futures has both humbled and enlightened me. Working with the Futures students taught me how to look beyond my unconscious assumptions and see a young person’s potential and inspiring motivation. I have come to learn more about social determinants that influence health, which has broadened my perspective of the impact of environment upon well-being. This summer has encouraged me to keep an open mind for my future medical practice and has taught me that there is always something to offer if there is a willingness to give.” Sina remarks, “The BTG CHIP has taught me cultural humility in a number of ways. Learning to connect and gain the trust of adolescents is not an easy task, but this program has given me the experience and tools necessary to begin to do so. These skills will surely be utilized as a physician in understanding patients to the fullest extent, allowing for the best care possible.”

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Temple Futures: Entrepreneurship and Writing

Student Interns:
Tickey Donnelly, Temple University, College of Health Professions and Social Work, Department of Nursing
Karen Stein, Temple University, College of Health Professions and Social Work, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Occupational Therapy Program

Academic Preceptor:
Jonathan Scott, PhD, Temple University

Community Preceptor:
Zeva Levine, EdM, Philadelphia Futures

The Community Site:
The Philadelphia Futures Entrepreneurship/Business Planning Internship , a union of White-Williams Scholars and Philadelphia Futures, provides academic and social resources for high-potential, economically disadvantaged, college-bound students in the Philadelphia school district. It provides low-income students who will be the first generation in their families to attend college with rigorous academic programs and resources to support them through high school and college. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Educational Advancement/Literacy; Preparedness

The Project:
The BTG student interns helped facilitate classroom activities on both entrepreneurship and writing for rising high school juniors at Temple University’s Fox School of Business. Interns served as mentors, assisting students in a wide range of academic and physical activities from grading quizzes to tutoring, facilitating daily warm-up activities and responding to student questions. In the afternoons, the interns performed one-to-one SAT tutoring sessions with rising high school seniors at Philadelphia Future’s main office in Center City. In addition, they created a Jeopardy game to help students learn various aspects of the material being taught, and they monitored student progress. Karen notes, “My experience at Philadelphia Futures has taught me to not always believe first impressions. It takes time for a person to open up to another and show their true colors. A truly wonderful person could be standing in front of me, but it may take a few meetings or therapy sessions for me to get to know the real him or her.” Tickey remarks, “Over the course of the past few weeks, I feel that I have embraced some of the important components of BTG. I found Chimamanda Adichie’s TED talk about a ‘Single Story’ to be both important and influential. The importance of active listening and patience have been two skills that were highly utilized at Philadelphia Futures and BTG.”

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Science, Health and Everything in Between

Student Interns:
Casey McKee, Temple University, College of Health Professions and Social Work, Occupational Therapy Program
Lilly Yi, Temple University, School of Medicine

Academic Preceptor:
Dianne Butera, MSW, Temple University, School of Medicine

Community Preceptors:
Terrence Seales, Temple University, Math and Science Upward Bound Program

The Community Site:
The Temple University Math Science Upward Bound (MSUB) is a comprehensive program designed to enhance the academic skills and preparation of talented high school students who have an interest in pursuing math or science as a major in college. While providing students with academic support and hands-on science and math experience and exploration, MSUB also assists students in the college preparation, identification and application process. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Adolescent Health; Heart Disease and Stroke; Nutrition and Weight Status; Physical Activity and Fitness; Sleep Health

The Project:
The BTG student interns’ responsibilities at the Temple University Math and Science Upward Bound (MSUB) Program included planning and preparing for MSUB’s annual Science Research Symposium, assisting students with their science research projects, constructing Healthy People 2020 public service announcements, planning and implementing Science Project Fridays, tutoring, and mentoring. Science Project Fridays consisted of weekly mini science labs, each highlighting basic concepts from physics, physiology, chemistry or health education. Along with conducting a health education workshop, the interns developed weekly public service announcement posters emphasizing health topics of particular relevance to the adolescents, including nutrition, physical activity, stress management and sleep health. Casey states, “Reflecting on my BTG summer experience at the Temple University Math and Science Upward Bound (MSUB) Program, I am extremely grateful that I was able to spend my summer internship with such a great group of high school students. Working with the adolescent population in an academic summer program, it was sometimes challenging to keep the students engaged. Getting to know each of the students individually allowed me to better meet their academic and sometimes personal goals. Preparing well for labs and allowing room for flexibility were crucial elements in the success of Science Project Fridays. I will make sure to keep the above-mentioned factors in mind when designing treatment plans and interacting with clients in the future. Leaving this summer internship, I hope the students at MSUB learned as much from me as I certainly did from them.” Lilly remarks, “I feel incredibly blessed to have had the opportunity to work with the bright, ambitious students of the Temple University Math and Science Upward Bound Program. The students demonstrated strength, perseverance and resilience through their ability to strive toward their goals, despite their personal challenges. Though many of them are self-proclaimed ‘science geeks,’ I realized that each student has a unique story and personality. Observing and listening to the students individually provided insight into both their unspoken and spoken needs, which enabled me to better understand and serve them. This adaptability learned through working with adolescents is something I plan to build upon in my future as a health care professional. Above all else, these students taught me that drive, determination and dreams are not and should not be limited by one’s circumstances. It’s comforting to know that there is a younger generation ready and willing to do what is necessary to help bridge the gap.”

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Inspiring Youth to Make Healthy Choices Amidst an Uncertain and Transient Home Environment

Student Interns:
Alaina Chodoff, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College
Stephen Topper, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College

Academic Preceptor:
R. Patrick McManus Jr., MD, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Medical College

Community Preceptors:
Willie D. Little, MSW, Youth Emergency Service
Christopher Pender, Youth Emergency Service

The Community Site:
Youth Emergency Service (YES), located in the Fairmount section of Philadelphia, provides temporary shelter and support services for adolescents aged 12 to 18. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas Adopted From HP2010 and HP2020:
Nutrition and Weight Status; Oral Health; Physical Activity and Fitness; Responsible Sexual Behavior; Tobacco Use

The Project:
This summer, the BTG student interns worked as health advocates for the residents at Youth Emergency Service (YES) to help develop nutritional and physical well-being. To achieve these objectives, the interns directed interactive group discussions about healthy eating—focusing on the importance of portion size and the adverse effects of fast food—and smoking. In addition, the interns stressed the value of education, personal goals and career aspirations. They worked alongside individual residents and social workers to ensure delivery of the appropriate medical services. The interns’ goals were to act as positive role models for the residents and to promote lifelong healthy habits. Alaina notes, “During my experience as an intern at YES, I learned that trust lies at the heart of developing meaningful relationships with the youth. Once we established trust with the kids, it became much easier to attain their respect, and they became more willing to speak openly and listen intently. At YES, I was struck by the resiliency of the youth who despite experiencing significant emotional and physical distress in the past, choose to live in the present. Most of the kids learn to embrace their passions and cope with their stress through journaling, writing, drawing, music, the arts, etc. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to step beyond my everyday comfort zone and see the multitude of factors that contribute to the well-being of a community, outside the confines of the doctor’s office.” Steve states, “This internship was a tremendous learning experience. I have gained a vast appreciation for the staff and social workers at YES who support the kids, but an even greater appreciation for the kids and their resilience through the most trying circumstances. Working with the youth both alongside a physician and independently provided many opportunities to form safe, trusting relationships. Through these relationships, I learned, BTG interns have the special opportunity to make a lasting, positive impact on many lives.”

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"My internship … has affected me deeply. I have learned about the complexities of substance abuse and the struggles women face to remain clean. Working with a student from a discipline other than my own has helped me to view health issues from another perspective."
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