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Philadelphia Consortium Projects - 2016

Adolescents & Young Adults

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#SPEAKINGFROMTHEINTERSECTIONS

Student Interns:
Joshua Kling, Drexel University College of Medicine
Mary Patterson, Drexel University, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Creative Arts in Therapy

Academic Preceptor:
Ryan Brannon, MD, Drexel University College of Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Jacinto J. Grant, MSW, The Attic Youth Center

The Community Site:
The Attic Youth Center, located in Center City Philadelphia, creates opportunities for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) youth and their allies to develop into creative, healthy, independent and civic-minded adults. The Attic is a safe and supportive community that promotes the acceptance of LGBTQ youth in society. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas (adapted from Healthy People 2010 and 2020):
Educational Advancement/Literacy; Health Communication; HIV; Mental Health; Responsible Sexual Behavior

The Project:
The Bridging the Gaps student interns worked with 40 teens participating in Philadelphia Youth Network’s WorkReady summer program. These high school students were placed at The Attic Youth Center to work on a project revolving around intersectionality, a social justice construct that parses the relationships among the dimensions of identity and oppression. The term is also used to describe ways in which social constructs such as racism, classism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism and misogyny are interconnected and how social inequality is experienced as an “intersection” of several forms of discrimination. The teens were divided into two groups, the theater arts cohort and the media arts cohort. The student interns assisted with co-facilitating the theater arts group, which functioned as a completely youth-led project and resulted in an exposition that showcased a theatrical production at the William Way LGBTQ Community Center in Philadelphia. The final exposition also included monologues, scenes, visual designs and devised theater pieces that explored the themes of classism, transphobia, misogyny, racism, ageism and homophobia. In addition to working with the high school youth, the BTG interns interacted with The Attic Youth Center’s regular drop-in attendees, who range in age from 14 to 23. Evening drop-in groups consisted of relational group discussions, creative expression through art and dance, music exploration, future-oriented and education-oriented groups, creative writing, empowerment and HIV education/prevention.

Personal Statements:
Josh said, “Throughout this summer with Bridging the Gaps, I have witnessed how different social constructs converge to shape one’s experience of oppression and privilege. Working with LGBTQ youth and their allies at The Attic Youth Center has shown me how the intersection of sexuality, gender, race and age affects both mental and physical health. I have been consistently impressed by the intelligence, creativity and resilience displayed by the youth as they navigate through oppressive systems of discrimination and hierarchy. Facilitating their progress and watching the end result has shown me the importance of empowering youth by lifting their voices and putting control back into their own hands.” Mary said, “Working at The Attic Youth Center has been incredibly rewarding, enlightening and FUN! The youth are self-motivated, creative, incredibly intelligent and so excited to be here. Each individual that walks through the door has a story, and the environment at this unique space allows those stories to be shared and heard. These young adults have allowed me the opportunity to reflect on my own life experiences, biases and worldviews. The youth remind me to really listen and be conscious about what I share and give back. Working with these talented people has kept me busy and honest. I am incredibly moved by my experience this summer, and I know I will carry the richness of this experience with me as I navigate the future pathways of my life.”

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Healing Hurt People One Step at a Time

Student Interns:
Tiarrah Salvi, Drexel University College of Medicine
Kia Williams, Drexel University, Dornsife School of Public Health

Academic Preceptor:
Erica J. Harris, MD, FAAEM, Drexel University College of Medicine

Community Preceptors:
Rachel Compton, MSW, LSW, Hahnemann Hospital, Healing Hurt People: Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice
Theodore Corbin, MD, MPP, Hahnemann Hospital, Healing Hurt People: Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice
John Rich, MD, MPH, Hahnemann Hospital, Healing Hurt People: Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice

The Community Site:
The Center for Nonviolence and Social Justice has integrated a violence intervention program known as Healing Hurt People (HHP). HHP is particularly aimed at helping individuals who are admitted in the emergency department due to an intentional injury (gunshot, stab or assault wound). HHP uses a trauma-informed approach known as the Sanctuary Model, created by HHP co-director Sandra Bloom, that gives clients an open space for healing, support and community. Putting this theory into practice, community intervention specialists, researchers, physicians and countless other dedicated staff provide clients with the resources for housing, mental health services and tools they need to survive and thrive after experiencing a traumatic injury. As an extension of the Sanctuary Model, HHP staff members have developed the S.E.L.F. (Safety, Emotions, Loss, and Future) framework, which recognizes that self-care is one of the many areas that need to be addressed during recovery. With great success, the HHP program has been replicated and used as a training regimen for many of the trauma centers in Philadelphia. It is clear that with these expansions, HHP has grown to become a leading example of what trauma-informed care should look like. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas (adapted from Healthy People 2010 and 2020):
Access to Health Care; Educational Advancement/Literacy; Environmental Health; Injury and Violence Prevention; Mental Health

The Project:
The Bridging the Gaps student interns researched and evaluated resources available in Philadelphia to address HHP client needs and then created a resource guide to be used by HHP staff and clients. The interns began this inquiry by meeting with staff members at HHP’s Hahnemann site to learn more about the needs of the program and staff. To assess the needs of the clients, the interns attended S.E.L.F. group therapy meetings and met with clients one on one at hospital bedsides and in the HHP office. After developing an exhaustive list of available resources, the interns called, e-mailed and visited more than 100 community organizations to evaluate them on criteria including trauma-informed care aptitude, bilingual accommodations and service affordability. These efforts resulted in the creation of a 50-page color-coded easy-to-use resource guide, an informational pamphlet for teens (in both English and Spanish), an informational pamphlet for adults, and the formation of valuable collaboration opportunities with a few particularly useful community organizations. HHP staff will use the resource guide as the foundation of a living document to be updated and maintained in an online database that will ensure resource referral effectiveness and reproducibility as HHP continues its rapid expansion across Philadelphia-area hospitals and beyond.

Personal Statements:
Tia said, “I feel extremely fortunate for the opportunity to intern with Healing Hurt People this summer. My short but personal experience working with people who have suffered from violent injury has transformed my views on mental health and health care access as a whole. As a result, I am better equipped to understand the need for adequate health care that addresses issues of poverty and socioeconomic disparities as well as the physiological needs of the patient. As a future physician I hope to be an accessible and effective aid to the patients I encounter along their path of healing.” Kia said, “By participating in the Bridging the Gaps program I had the opportunity to explore health care beyond the realm of public health. From an interdisciplinary perspective I know that changes in health care cannot be made without a collaborative effort. By interning at Healing Hurt People I understand that in order to recover and heal, patients must first acknowledge that they need help. Most importantly, from all of my experiences I learned that as a health professional I must look beyond a single narrative of a patient, disease or statistic and have a greater level of empathy and understanding.”

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Changing Communities, Discovering Passion and Shaping Careers

Student Interns:
Matilda (Emily) David, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine
Miriam Iken, University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice

Academic Preceptors:
Zvi D. Gellis, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, School of Social Policy & Practice
Brittany Watson, VMD, PhD, University of Pennsylvania, School of Veterinary Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Jacqui Bowman, PhD, Center for Education and Public Initiatives, The College of Physicians of Philadelphia

The Community Site:
The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, located in Center City, is the oldest professional medical organization in the United States. Its mission is to advance the cause of health while upholding the ideals and heritage of medicine. Among its many outreach efforts are the Karabots Program and the Teva Program, both of which focus on the personal and professional development of Philadelphia high school students. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas (adapted from Healthy People 2010 and 2020):
Access to Health Care; Educational Advancement/Literacy; Injury and Violence Prevention; Mental Health; Preparedness

The Project:
The Bridging the Gaps student interns worked at The College of Physicians of Philadelphia in the Center for Education and Professional Initiatives (CEPI). The interns worked primarily with the Teva Summer Internship Program, which offers Philadelphia high school students the opportunity to learn about and discuss issues surrounding violence in their communities. Another focus of the Teva Internship Program is to expose the students to STEM careers. The BTG interns helped to prepare for the Teva Program, facilitated group discussions, and participated in programming and field trips, including to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Drexel College of Medicine, Eastern State Penitentiary and Community College of Philadelphia.

Personal Statements:
Matilda said, “Working with the Center for Education and Professional Initiatives at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia this summer, I have had the opportunity to meet many professionals in Philadelphia, most of whom are in the STEM careers, all invested in helping Philadelphia students gain access to educational opportunities and inspiring these students to discover their passions and pursue meaningful careers. These mentors have widened my perception of what it means, as a professional, to reach out to your community and share your passion with students. These mentors have shaped my vision of the kind of doctor that I aspire to be.” Miriam said, “This past year as a first-year social work student, I have learned about the diversity, poverty and racism that exist throughout the city of Philadelphia. By participating in Bridging the Gaps, specifically with students at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, I have been exposed to the populations that are affected most by these factors. Daily, I was impressed by the intelligent and motivated students that participated in the TEVA Pharmaceuticals Summer Internship Program, and was reminded of why I chose to dedicate my life to a career in social work.”

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B.I.G.: Bartram’s Incredible Gardeners!

Student Interns:
Nicole Massetti, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine
Benjamin Truong, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine
Connie Xu, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing

Academic Preceptors:
Joan I. Gluch, PhD, RDH, PHDHP, University of Pennsylvania, School of Dental Medicine
Ann L. O’Sullivan, PhD, FAAN, CRNP, University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing

Community Preceptor:
Sister Alia Walker, Earth’s Keepers, Inc.

The Community Site:
Earth’s Keepers, Inc., is an urban farm in Southwest Philadelphia that supports the community’s right to food sovereignty and justice. Earth’s Keepers aims to establish a sustainable and healthy food source for those who otherwise cannot access or afford to purchase fresh, culturally appropriate organic foods. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas (adapted from Healthy People 2010 and 2020):
Environmental Health; Heart Disease and Stroke; Nutrition and Weight Status; Oral Health; Physical Activity and Fitness

The Project:
The Bridging the Gaps student interns worked closely with high school students employed by the Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative’s Youth Development program. By teaching cooking skills, operating farmers markets, and tending crops at Earth’s Keepers and the Community Farm and Food Resource Center at Bartram’s Garden, the interns engaged the youth participants to become more aware of issues surrounding food sovereignty and justice in Southwest Philadelphia. They empowered students to regain control of their own health and nutrition by teaching several cardiovascular and oral health lessons throughout the program, and they supported the Bartram’s Garden staff in weekly workshops designed to improve students’ professional skills, farming knowledge and cultural awareness.

Personal Statements:
Nicole said, “By helping with the farming process, I learned just how much hard work and effort goes into bringing food to my table. I take for granted how easy it is for many of us to have access to healthy food while entire populations of people are suffering from inaccessibility to sustainable and healthy food sources all across our nation. By urban farming, I can bring power and sovereignty back to the communities that need it most.” Benjamin said, “I learned that food can bring a community together, and by growing healthy food, learning where it comes from and the story behind each food, I can empower people to live a healthier lifestyle.” Connie , “Working with the kids at Earth’s Keepers has opened my eyes to the importance of promoting food sovereignty and justice here in Southwest Philadelphia. To me, working in urban gardens empowers youth not only to take control of their own health, but also to shape the communities in which they live.”

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Shaping the Future Generations – EducationWorks

Student Interns:
Brandon Barndt, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine Program
Christine Gayed, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy

Academic Preceptors:
Pat Lannutti, DO, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Cathy Y. Poon, PharmD, FPPAG, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy

Community Preceptor:
Dana Griffith, BS, EducationWorks

The Community Site:
EducationWorks enriches the lives of children and families by providing educational programs and services in communities confronting high rates of poverty and other barriers to educational achievement. EducationWorks provides a specialized summer program for adolescents, preparing them for and exposing them to possible career options. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas (adapted from Healthy People 2010 and 2020):
Educational Advancement/Literacy; Health-Related Quality of Life and Well-Being; Injury and Violence Prevention; Oral Health; Responsible Sexual Behavior

The Project:
The Bridging the Gaps student interns worked with adolescents from the Career Exposure Program at Robert Morris Elementary School, under the EducationWorks umbrella. The Career Exposure Program exposes students to careers in technology and media, human services, culinary arts, business and marketing, and health care. The interns created activities that focused on using 21st-century skills, such as flexibility/adaptability, teamwork/collaboration, initiative/self-direction, and productivity/accountability, and identifying the relationship between these skills and the workplace. The interns simulated scenarios that allowed the students to use the 21st-century skills and receive pertinent feedback. The interns also organized site visits to relevant professional workplaces to give the students a better perspective on what working professionals in related fields do for a living.

Personal Statements:
Brandon said, “Spending the summer interacting with and teaching impressionable middle school children from urban schools in Philadelphia has truly changed my perspective on more than just medicine. I learned as much, or perhaps more, from the kids as they learned from me. This experience has greatly expanded my horizons and has allowed me to take another step forward towards my goal of becoming a better future physician.” Christine said, “The Bridging the Gaps program has given me the opportunity to spend time with the community that I want to serve in the future. The amazing strength of the people I have met in the BTG CHIP experience was inspiring and will remain with me for a long time. I hope that as a pharmacist, I can remember this experience as a constant reminder to always be kind and nonjudgmental with each patient that I encounter.”

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Teaching and Learning — A Dual Imperative

Student Intern:
Louis Peterson, Drexel University College of Medicine

Academic Preceptor:
Elissa Goldberg, MSS, LSW, Drexel University College of Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Katie Price, PhD, Philadelphia Futures

The Community Site:
Philadelphia Futures provides academic and social resources for high-potential, economically disadvantaged, college-bound students in the Philadelphia school district. It provides low-income students who will be the first generation in their families to attend college with rigorous academic programs and resources to support them through high school and college. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas (adapted from Healthy People 2010 and 2020):
Educational Advancement/Literacy; Environmental Health; Preparedness

The Project:
The Bridging the Gap student intern at Philadelphia Futures provided administrative support for summer courses designed to enhance the high school education of scholars in the program. The intern provided SAT, math, writing and reading tutoring to students and assisted with major projects such as the summer college marathon to help students apply to and prepare for college. The intern also assisted with administrative tasks as needed.

Personal Statement:
Louis said, “Being an effective physician in any area requires a basic understanding of the challenges, needs and concerns facing your patient population. As a transplant to this area, working with these students represents an opportunity to familiarize myself with a cross-section of the city and its inhabitants. In addition, investing in my community helps me stay connected to the reasons I decided to become a physician.”

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Improving Treatment of and Outcomes for Youth in Secure Detention: With Limited Resources, Where to Start?

Student Intern:
Katherine McDermott, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

Academic Preceptor:
Anna Morgan, MD, MSc, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Timene Farlow, MSW, Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center

The Community Site:
The Juvenile Justice Services Center is the only secure youth detention facility in Philadelphia. At the Center, juveniles between the ages of 13 and 20 who are deemed by the court to be a serious risk to the safety of the community or at risk of failure to appear at their scheduled court hearings await their hearing in Juvenile Court; the Center also houses juveniles who have been adjudicated guilty while they await placement at a residential treatment facility. All residents follow a strict schedule of activities including regular school sessions conducted on-site by the Philadelphia School District, individual and group counseling, and supervised indoor and outdoor recreation. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas (adapted from Healthy People 2010 and 2020):
Access to Health Care; Health Communication; Infant and Child Health; Injury and Violence Prevention; Mental Health

The Project:
Summer 2016 is the first time the Philadelphia Juvenile Justice Services Center (PJJSC) participated as a BTG site. The Bridging the Gaps student intern was asked to design a project to improve the experience of court-involved youth who experience secure detention. After weeks spent observing PJJSC operations; sitting in on staff meetings, juvenile case reviews, and court proceedings; conducting a focus group with Center residents; and poring over national and local literature on evidence-based juvenile justice reform, the intern initiated the design of a live, web-based behavioral management database for the PJJSC. As it stands, most documentation of concerning behavior and reportable behavioral incidents at the Center is conducted on paper and shared by relatively informal staff communication. This new database, constructed using REDCap, will serve as a central repository for information on both specific incidents and on staff impressions of behavioral changes that may signal maladjusted youth or predict a higher risk of fighting or self-harm.

Personal Statement:
Katherine said, “My primary activity this summer, by a long shot, was learning. Staff here at the Center and across the spectrum of organizations that touch justice-involved youth — from the courts, from other arms of the Department of Human Services, from contracted health care providers, from community-based organizations, from private nonprofits who provide services to court-involved youth — have been incredibly generous with their time and energy as I’ve struggled to wrap my head around the complexities of the juvenile justice system in Philadelphia. I have no doubt that my experience this summer will shape the path of my career in medicine, and though I wish I could’ve contributed more during my time as an intern at the PJJSC, I’m hopeful that my future contributions as activist for justice reform and an advocate for court-involved (or at-risk) patients will lead to more significant positive change.”

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Medical & Pharmacy Students Working in Collaboration for a Better Tomorrow

Student Interns:
Avani Dalal, Temple University, Lewis Katz School of Medicine
Mahjabeen Maaf, Temple University, School of Pharmacy

Academic Preceptor:
Dianne Butera, MSW, Temple University, Lewis Katz School of Medicine

Community Preceptor:
Vanessa Atkins, MS, Temple University Upward Bound

The Community Site:
The Temple University Upward Bound Program prepares Philadelphia public and charter high school students for admission to institutions of higher learning and for success in the collegiate environment through intense academic enrichment, a summer college immersion experience, enhanced cognitive and critical thinking, and extensive interpersonal development through positive social interactions. The programs enable students to set attainable goals and build self-awareness; respect for diversity; and healthy relationships with peers, staff, and professionals from industry and the community. View Community Partner Web Site

BTG Focus Areas (adapted from Healthy People 2010 and 2020):
Educational Advancement/Literacy; Health Communication; Mental Health; Oral Health; Physical Activity and Fitness

The Project:
Upward Bound and Math/Science Upward Bound help high school students in the Philadelphia school system achieve their goals of going to college. These programs provide students with college and SAT prep, financial aid and scholarship information, college tours, tutoring and mentoring, and a six-week summer residential experience. During the summer program, the Bridging the Gaps student interns helped teach science classes, organized experiments for science projects, facilitated senior internships, helped with science projects and the symposium, and helped with various administrative tasks. They also got the opportunity to mentor students and help organize activities and events.

Personal Statements:
Mahjabeen said, “The impact that the BTG CHIP experience had was life-changing; it helped me to evolve into the pharmacist I want to see myself as in a couple of years. I hope the students as well as the staff enjoyed our time being there as much as I enjoyed my time.” Avani said, “BTG CHIP has been an incredible eye-opening experience for me. I have learned so much about the community I do and will continue to serve as a physician. It is an incredible honor to have been a part of the Upward Bound site and be able to get an inside, firsthand look at the challenges and lives of the students and staff members. I learned so much about how health is more than just your body and how it is doing. We have had numerous lectures this year about social and other determinants of health. This experience really solidified that for me. It also helped me see ‘beyond’ the patient.”

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