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Preterm Birth Research Undergraduate Summer Program

The March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center at the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to announce a summer research program for Penn undergraduate students.

Program Description

Preterm birth is a global public health problem. 15 million babies are born preterm annually and complications from preterm birth are the leading cause of death among children under 5 years. The March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center at the University of Pennsylvania is one of 5 national centers dedicated to identifying the causes of preterm birth that will result in more effective strategies to prevent preterm birth in the future. At Penn we have a transdisciplinary team of investigators with expertise in obstetrics, pediatrics, neonatology, genetics, metabolism, cell and developmental biology, bioengineering, microbiology, and reproductive biology working together to solve this problem.

This 10-week program is designed to expose undergraduate students to transdisciplinary research on preterm birth with an assigned research mentor. Students will also have an opportunity to observe in the clinics and the hospital.

http://www.prematurityresearch.org/penn/news/preterm-birth-research-undergraduate-summer-program/

 

Biomarker Discovery May Lead To Reliable Blood Test For Ectopic Pregnancy
Several science news websites, including e! Science News, Science Codex, and Science Blog, reported that scientists from The Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered protein markers that could provide physicians with the first reliable blood test to predict ectopic pregnancies. Their findings have been published in the February 16 issue of the Journal of Proteome Research. Kurt Barnhart, MD. MSCE, associate director of Penn Fertility Care and director of Clinical Research for the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, worked in collaboration with the Wistar team and is continuing to test the reliability of this biomarker blood test to diagnose ectopic pregnancies, which are the leading cause of death in the first trimester of pregnancy.
e! Science News article