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2010 - 2011 Seminar Series (Archived)

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Special Networking Session for Women Fellows & Residents*

(*Reserved for women fellows and residents)

Gender Influences in Negotiation

After completing this session, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize gender influences in communications
  • Assess a negotiation from a gender perspective
  • Apply an array of strategies and techniques to increase their skill and effectiveness when negotiating in a cross-gender context.

Guest Presenter:
Catherine J. Morrison, JD
Assistant Professor, Business of Health
Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Date: November 8, 2010 (Monday)
Time: 5:15 – 7:15 PM
Location: 5 Maloney Conference Room, HUP (Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania – 5th floor Maloney Building )

BIO: Catherine J. Morrison, JD is a negotiation and conflict management expert who helps academic health care institutions become more capable at resolving conflicts and creating effective change. For each consulting engagement she brings extensive experience as an institutional administrator herself and as an award-winning professor. She employs negotiation and conflict management frameworks that are compatible with clinical diagnostic models and bioscience research approaches and that apply across diverse cultures. Her consulting clients include Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences, New York University Langone Medical Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, University of Vermont College of Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Association of American Medical Colleges, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and others. She is an Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School and Associate Faculty member in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Catherine is a two-time recipient of the Best of Hopkins teaching award from the graduates of Johns Hopkins University’s Business of Medicine MBA program. She has also received the Excellence in Teaching award from the Graduate Division of Business and Management at Johns Hopkins. She has served in senior administrative roles at the University of Texas Medical Branch, University of Maryland Baltimore, and Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, and has practiced law. She received her law degree from the University of Pennsylvania and undergraduate degree from Oakland University. As both a participant and an observer in academic health care management and the practice of law, Catherine recognized the transformative potential of negotiation and conflict for individuals and organizations. Her consulting, teaching, and research are grounded in the belief that individuals can use negotiation and conflict as a means to define themselves and others. Effective negotiation can be an opportunity to engage in a collaborative, imaginative dialogue to develop unique ideas and agreements. When thoughtfully analyzed and appropriately managed, the energy of conflict can be used to strengthen ideas and relationships. Catherine’s favorite place to spend time outside the classroom is in a free weights only gym. She trains, and occasionally competes, as a power lifter. After six years of training, she has developed an interesting theory about the relationship between power lifting and conflict management.

This networking event is being sponsored jointly by the Office of Graduate Medical Education (GME) & FOCUS on Health & Leadership for Women (FOCUS).


Breaking Barriers: Caring for the Underserved and Undocumented

Objectives:

Discuss the limitations to healthcare encountered by a migrant population
Understand the value of outreach in the development of the physician
Describe our experience with providing healthcare to a migrant population

Jack Ludmir, MD
Professor and Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Pennsylvania Hospital
Vice Chairman, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Director of Obstetrical Services
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
President of Women and Children’s Health Services

Date: January 19, 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 PM
Location: Seminar Room 253, BRB II/III (Biomedical Research Building, 421 Curie Blvd.)

BIO: Jack Ludmir, M.D.is Professor and Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Pennsylvania Hospital, and Vice Chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Director of Obstetrical Services at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He is also the President of Women and Children’s Health Services, a not for profit organization dedicated to the care of women from our surrounding communities. Dr. Ludmir completed his residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology and fellowship in Maternal-Fetal Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and has been faculty at Harvard and Penn for the last twenty years. He was awarded the Alfred Stengel Penn Health System Champion Award for improving and transforming the entire Health System’s obstetrical services, and ensuring that every patient has a right to prenatal care. His strong advocacy for the care of vulnerable populations has been recognized by being the director of the City of Philadelphia task force for the obstetric care of the undeserved and uninsured.  At the national level, he is a member of the American Hospital Association Maternal Child Government Council, and has been a member of the American College Of Obstetrics and Gynecology Practice Bulletin and Obstetric Practice Committees.  Dr. Ludmir is an evaluator of the standards and quality of maternity care in several countries in Latin America and has established formal relationships with universities in those countries to capacitate personnel to improve the care of women.


Misuse and Abuse of Stimulants Among U.S. College Students -

A Growing Public Health Concern

This talk will:

  • Review the history of stimulant misuse and abuse among college students
  • Describe prevalence, signs and symptoms of stimulant misuse and abuse among college students
  • Review key studies linking nonprescription stimulant usage to student profiles including risk taking, alcohol and other drug use, health status and academic performance
  • Discuss strategies to limit non-medical use of stimulants on college campuses

Anthony Rostain, MD, MA
Professor of Psychiatry
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Director of Education, Department of Psychiatry
University of Pennsylvania Health System

Date: March 23, 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 PM
Location: Penn Tower Conference Room, Bridge Level

BIO: Anthony L. Rostain, M.D., M.A. is Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He is Director of Education for the Department of Psychiatry where he is responsible for overseeing medical student education, residency and fellowship training. He is triple boarded in pediatrics, adult psychiatry, and child and adolescent psychiatry. His primary clinical focus is "lifespan neurodevelopmental psychiatry," treating patients of all ages with Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder, Asperger Syndrome / High Functioning Autism, Tourette Syndrome, Learning Disabilities (Verbal and Nonverbal) and social communication disorders. He is an attending and supervising psychiatrist at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and University of Pennsylvania Health System (UPHS).

Dr. Rostain is the Director of the Adult Development Disorders Unit (Penn Behavioral Health) which includes the Adult ADHD Treatment and Research Program and the Adult Social Learning Disorders Program. He is also Director of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Behavioral Health Center’s Developmental Neuropsychiatry Program and is a core team member of the CHOP Center for Autism Research (CAR) where he participates in clinical care, research, educational activities. Dr. Rostain is also a faculty member in the Center for Neuroscience and Society where he participates in research seminars and teaches about clinical applications and ethical aspects of cognitive neuroscience. Most recently, he has been active in addressing the growing trend toward nonmedical use of stimulants for cognitive enhancement. He is co-author with J. Russell Ramsay, Ph.D., of "Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adult ADHD: An Integrative Psychosocial and Medical Approach," published by Routledge Press (2008).

Also see: http://neuroethics.upenn.edu/index.php/people/faculty


Special Networking Session for Women & Men Fellows & Residents*

(*Reserved for women & men fellows and residents)

Show Me the Money: Employment and Compensation Negotiations

Guest Presenter:

Catherine J. Morrison, JD
Assistant Professor, Business of Health
Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Date: March 24, 2011 (Thursday)
Time: 5:15 – 7:15 PM
Location: Seminar Room 253, BRB II/III (Biomedical Research Building, 421 Curie Blvd.)

BIO: Catherine J. Morrison, JD is a negotiation and conflict management expert who helps academic health care institutions become more capable at resolving conflicts and creating effective change. For each consulting engagement she brings extensive experience as an institutional administrator herself and as an award-winning professor. She employs negotiation and conflict management frameworks that are compatible with clinical diagnostic models and bioscience research approaches and that apply across diverse cultures. Her consulting clients include Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Children’s Hospital of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences, New York University Langone Medical Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, University of Vermont College of Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Association of American Medical Colleges, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and others. She is an Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School and Associate Faculty member in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Catherine is a two-time recipient of the Best of Hopkins teaching award from the graduates of Johns Hopkins University’s Business of Medicine MBA program. She has also received the Excellence in Teaching award from the Graduate Division of Business and Management at Johns Hopkins. She has served in senior administrative roles at the University of Texas Medical Branch, University of Maryland Baltimore, and Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, and has practiced law. She received her law degree from the University of Pennsylvania and undergraduate degree from Oakland University. As both a participant and an observer in academic health care management and the practice of law, Catherine recognized the transformative potential of negotiation and conflict for individuals and organizations. Her consulting, teaching, and research are grounded in the belief that individuals can use negotiation and conflict as a means to define themselves and others. Effective negotiation can be an opportunity to engage in a collaborative, imaginative dialogue to develop unique ideas and agreements. When thoughtfully analyzed and appropriately managed, the energy of conflict can be used to strengthen ideas and relationships. Catherine’s favorite place to spend time outside the classroom is in a free weights only gym. She trains, and occasionally competes, as a power lifter. After six years of training, she has developed an interesting theory about the relationship between power lifting and conflict management.

This networking event is being sponsored jointly by the Office of Graduate Medical Education (GME) & FOCUS on Health & Leadership for Women (FOCUS).


Women's Behavioral Wellness: What Do Hormones Have to Do With It?

In this session, Dr. Neill Epperson the Director of the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness will provide a brief overview of the growing literature regarding ovarian hormone effects on brain function and behavior, highlighting the importance of behavioral medicine in women's health care.

C. Neill Epperson, M.D.
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Founder & Director, Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness
University of Pennsylvania

Date: April 18 , 2011 (Monday)
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 PM
Location: Penn Tower Conference Room, Bridge Level

BIO: Neill Epperson, M.D. is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Obstetrics, Gynecology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine where she is also the Founder and Director of the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, a clinical and research program in the Departments of Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Epperson received her M.D. degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and completed her postdoctoral and research training in psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine where she rose to the level of Associate Professor before moving to Penn in the Fall of 2009. Dr. Epperson’s research focusing on the role of ovarian hormones and neurosteroids in cognition and behavior across the female life span has been funded, in part, by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Drug Abuse, the Ethel F. Donaghue Foundation, the National Alliance for Research in Schizophrenia and Depression and the Dana Foundation. Dr. Epperson’s work has been published in prestigious peer-reviewed journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, the Archives of General Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, Neuropsychopharmacology, and the journal Menopause.


Special Networking Session for Women Fellows & Residents*

(*Reserved for women fellows and residents)

Next Steps and Beyond:

Panel Discussion of Career Paths at Various Professional Stages

Date: May 10, 2011 (Tuesday)
Time: 5:30 – 7:00 PM (Light dinner provided!)
Location: Penn Tower Conference Room, Bridge Level

This panel discussion, sponsored jointly by FOCUS on Health & Leadership for Women (FOCUS) and the Office of Graduate Medical Education (GME), will be a unique opportunity for women trainees to obtain career guidance and insight from exceptional role models here at Penn Medicine.

The primary purpose of this FOCUS session will be to address themes such as the rewards and challenges of a career in academic medicine, the various career paths within an academic health center and how to choose the path best suited for you, the art of navigating through academia, consideration of academic institutions that may differ from Penn, and work-life balance in these various environments. We have intentionally assembled a group of panelists who as a whole represent not only different academic faculty tracks (Tenure, Clinician-Educator, Academic Clinician), but also different career stages. Our panelists are either Penn or CHOP medical faculty and have had a broad range of professional and personal experiences. We also plan to discuss "nuts and bolts" topics such as being savvy about salaries and time management.

PANELISTS:

Anne R. Cappola, MD, ScM
Assistant Professor of Medicine; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism
(Assoc Prof as of 7-1-11)
Director of Research Education, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism
Associate Scholar at the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Fellow in the Institute on Aging
Assistant Director of the Type 2 Diabetes Unit, Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Emma Anne Meagher, M.D.
Associate Professor, Medicine and Pharmacology
Director, Translational Research Programs
Co-Director, Cardiovascular Prevention Program
Executive Chair, Institutional Review Board
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Anne F. Reilly, MD, MPH
Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Medical Director, Division of Oncology
The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

BIOS:

Anne R. Cappola, M.D., Sc.M. -
Dr. Anne Cappola is an Assistant Professor of Medicine; Director of Research Education for the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism; Associate Scholar at the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Fellow in the Institute on Aging; and Assistant Director of the Type 2 Diabetes Unit in the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, all at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Cappola received her A.B. in Biochemistry at Harvard College and her M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She was a resident in Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and a fellow in Endocrinology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. She has also completed a Master of Science in Clinical Epidemiology and a fellowship in the Epidemiology of Aging at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She spent two years on the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Medicine before joining the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 2003. Dr. Cappola’s research focuses on the hormonal alterations that occur with aging and the clinical impact of these changes. Her research studies range from mechanistic protocols conducted in Penn’s Clinical and Translational Research Center to analyses of data from large cohort studies. She has been funded by the American Federation for Aging Research, the John A. Hartford Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. She serves on the Editorial Boards for the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism and the Journal of Gerontology Medical Sciences. She has been recognized for her excellence in teaching and mentoring as a recipient of the Edward Rose Faculty Teaching Award and The Endocrine Society’s Thyroid Clinical Research Mentor Award.

Emma A. Meagher, MD, serves as Associate Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, PA and as Co Director of the Preventive Cardiology Program for the University of Pennsylvania Health System.  She is also Director of the Masters of Science degree program in Translational Research, Course Director of Pharmacology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Executive Chair of the University of Pennsylvania Institutional Review Board and Chair of the Admissions Committee for University of Pennsylvania Medical School. Dr. Meagher graduated summa cum laude with her medical doctorate degree from the Royal College of Surgeons in Dublin, Ireland.  Following completion of an internship and residency in internal medicine she was appointed as Senior Registrar /Lecturer of Cardiovascular Medicine at Mater Hospital, University College in Dublin, Ireland. Dr. Meagher’s educational interests are in the fields of translational research methodology to graduate, pre and post doctoral students and novel modalities for education in pharmacology to undergraduate medical (UME) students. To this end she directs the University of Pennsylvania pharmacology curriculum, is Program Director for the Master of Science degree program in Translational Research and Co PI of the UPenn Clinical and Translational Sciences Award (CTSA). Dr Meagher’s research interest is the development of novel therapeutics in dyslipidemia. Her clinical practice is focused on cardiovascular risk modification with an emphasis on management of dyslipidemia, hypertension and women’s cardiovascular health. Dr. Meagher is a member of the American Heart Association’s Council on Atherosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, the American Society of Hypertension, the American Federation for Medical Research, the Association for Clinical Research Training and the Society for Clinical and Translational Science. Dr Meagher has been the recipient of two National Institute of Health Clinical Associate Physician Research Awards and is CoPI of the UPenn CTSA award. In addition, in recognition for her efforts in education she has received numerous institutional teaching awards: The Dean's Award for the Development of Innovative Educational Programs (1999), The Leonard Berwick Memorial Teaching Award (2001), The Outstanding Lecturer Award (2002), The Outstanding Lecturer Basic Science (2000, 2004, 2006,2008, 2010), The Arthur K. Asbury Mentoring Award (2004), Medical Student Government Awards for Basic Science Education (2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008), The Dunning Dripps Award for post graduate education (2009) and the university’s highest teaching honor, the Lindback Award for Medical Education (2005). Dr. Meagher has published articles in numerous journals, including the Journal of Clinical Investigation, JAMA, The Journal of Biological Chemistry, The American Journal of Cardiology, Hypertension, and the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology.  She has written numerous reviews and book chapters, and has lectured widely at medical meetings, nationally and internationally.

Anne F. Reilly, MD, MPH is Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania, and Medical Director of the Division of Oncology at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Reilly completed her residency in Pediatrics at the Medical Center of Delaware, and fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.  As a member of the Academic Clinician track at the Medical School, and in her role as Medical Director of Oncology, Dr. Reilly has worked to create clinical systems and programs that seek to provide the most effective but also safest and most efficient care possible for children with cancer. Recently this has included reorganizing the Division’s clinical programs in a disease-based approach, in addition to  development of programs including  catheter-associated bloodstream infection prevention and chemotherapy safety. Dr. Reilly’s chief clinical interests are supportive care for children undergoing cancer therapy, the treatment of children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and psychosocial support and interventions for children and families in oncology.  


Heart Disease and Pregnancy: Toward a Multi-Disciplinary Model of Care

Heart disease in pregnancy is an important and under-recognized cause of maternal mortality and can lead to heart failure, stroke, arrhythmias, and poor fetal outcomes. Additionally, the specter of cardiac complications in pregnancy can lead to a frightening experience for the entire family during a vulnerable time of life. For women with structural heart disease, the hemodynamic changes of pregnancy may be poorly tolerated. A thorough evaluation of a woman’s cardiac status early in the pregnancy is necessary to ensure optimal maternal and fetal outcomes. Moreover, clear communication and alignment of treatment goals between OBGYN, cardiology, anesthesiology, nursing and the patient is vital to effective treatment of complications. We created a multidisciplinary program at Pennsylvania Hospital called the Women’s Cardiovascular Center in order to provide a comprehensive care plan for our patients. Now three years old, the Women’s Cardiovascular Center represents a joint effort by OBGYN, anesthesiology and cardiology to provide the highest quality care for pregnant patients who are vulnerable to cardiac complications. This session will focus on the program’s history and lead to a discussion about other potential models for integrating care and improving women’s health.

Nazanin Moghbeli, MD, MPH
Founder and Director, Women's Cardiovascular Center
Pennsylvania Hospital
Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine

Date: May 12 , 2011 (Thursday)
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 PM
Location: Penn Tower Conference Room, Bridge Level

BIO: Dr. Nazanin Moghbeli is the founder and director of the Women's Cardiovascular Center at Pennsylvania Hospital. She received her medical degree at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and a Masters of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Dr. Moghbeli completed an internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She completed her cardiovascular fellowship training at the University of Pennsylvania, where she focused on cardiac imaging and women’s cardiovascular health. In addition to cardiac complications of pregnancy, her interests include reducing disparities in cardiovascular health care. Her research on cardiac biomarkers in preeclampsia was recently published in the American Journal of Perinatology.


Empowerment through Challenge: A Personal Story of Climbing the Academic Ladder

In this interactive session, Dr. Stineman will share how she overcame many barriers moving through the promotions process in medical school as a woman born with severe disabilities. The goals of this session are to:

  • Inspire participants to think creatively about the balance and challenges in their own
    lives and careers
  • Raise awareness to the capacities and potential of patients with disabilities
  • Share the connections between art, science, music and medicine

Margaret G. Stineman, MD, FACRM
Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Professor of Epidemiology
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
University of Pennsylvania

Date: June 8, 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 PM
Location:Seminar Room 253, BRB II/III (Biomedical Research Building, 421 Curie Blvd.)

BIO: Margaret G. Stineman, MD, FACRM recently elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), is a tenured Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pennsylvania. She has a second professorship of epidemiology. She is also a Senior Scholar in the Clinical Epidemiology Unit of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (CCEB), a Senior Fellow with the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, a Senior Fellow of the Institute on Aging, and a fellow of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Her clinical focus is on the care of people with disabilities. Her research applies both qualitative phenomenological methods and quantitative analytic approaches to disability sciences. Expert in statistical modeling, health status, functional status, and quality of life measurement, she has served as PI on numerous NIH and AHRQ funded projects since 1990 covering a broad range of topics of relevance to people with disabilities. Areas include the development of the Functional Independent Staging approach, comorbidity measurement, outcomes assessment, effectiveness research applying various approaches to remove selection bias, environmental confounds of disability, and quality of life measurement. Work directed by Dr. Stineman has informed national and international health care policy. She was the PI on a series of projects that led to a clinical case-mix measure, which forms the basis of Medicare’s Prospective Payment System for medical rehabilitation. That measure is also used as a national performance indicator by the Department of Veterans Affairs. She served as consultant to many national and international organizations including the World Health Organization and CMS. Finally she and her colleagues developed a procedure referred to as Recovery Preference Exploration (RPE) designed to understand the personal meaning behind alternative disability and health states and to enhance the depth of communication between patients and clinicians. Dr. Stineman is also a singer song writer and is active as a visual artist.


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