Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Institute for Immunology

Executive Committee

David Allman, Ph.D.

David Allman, Ph.D.
Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Our main focus concerns the mechanisms underlying differentiation within the B cell lineage. We are currently focusing on two aspects of B cell development and differentiation. A central interest in my lab concerns the differentiation of antibody-secreting plasma cells from naïve and memory B cells. The second main focus in my laboratory concerns how specific transcription factors promote the earliest phases of B cell development from multipotent progenitors.


Ronald Collman, M.D.

Ronald Collman, M.D.
Professor of Medicine

Project 1: HIV/SIV entry. Our lab studies HIV and SIV infection, focusing on the mechanisms of entry into different target cells and how viral target cell tropism influences disease. Project 2: Monocyte/macrophage activation in HIV infection: mechanisms, role in pathogenesis and modulation. Project 3: Human respiratory tract microbiome.


James Hoxie, M.D.

James Hoxie, M.D.
Professor of Medicine

Research in Dr. Hoxie's lab is focused on identifying viral and cellular determinants that are relevant to the ability of HIV and SIV to infect cells and to evade host immune responses. Three specific areas of work include: 1. Producing modified HIV envelope glycoproteins for vaccine studies. 2. Studies of CD4-independent isolates of HIV. 3. The role of the HIV/SIV cytoplasmic tail in pathogenesis. 


Christopher Hunter, B.Sc., Ph.D.

Christopher Hunter, B.Sc., Ph.D.
Mindy Halikman Heyer Distinguished Professor of Pathobiology and Chairman, Department of Pathobiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine

The Hunter laboratory has several areas of research that center around understanding how the immune system deals with T. gondii. The first focuses on host pathogen interactions at the cellular level and how the parasite interacts with intracellular signaling pathways (NF-kB/JAK-STAT). These latter studies compliment the work in the laboratory that has helped to define the cytokine networks that regulate the balance between protective and pathological immune responses and current studies focus on the IL-6 family of cytokines in these events. Lastly the laboratory is interested in better understanding the pathogenesis of toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) in the immunocompromised patients who develop this disease.


Carl H. June, M.D.

Carl H. June, M.D.
Richard W. Vague Professor in Immunotherapy and Director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies

The June Lab is primarily responsible for developing new CARs and new vectors for current and proposed indications. The June Laboratory provides researchers with the tools they need to translate laboratory insights into safe and effective cancer therapies. In addition, the June Laboratory has a cadre of faculty researchers focused on developing ways to enhance the ability of the natural immune system to recognize and eliminate tumor cells.


Taku Kambayashi, M.D., Ph.D.

Taku Kambayashi, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

The Kambayashi laboratory focusses on three areas of research. 1) Regulation of T cell responses. 2) Regulatory T cell expansion and homeostasis. 4) NK cell education and signaling.


Kathleen E. Sullivan, M.D., Ph.D.

Kathleen E. Sullivan, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Pediatrics

We are interested in genes that control inflammation and specifically in the role of these genes in inflammatory disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Crohn's disease. A variety of techniques are used in the lab to understand the genetics of SLE.


Robert Vonderheide, M.D., D.Phil.

Robert Vonderheide, M.D., D.Phil.
John H. Glick, MD Abramson Cancer Center’s Director Professor

The Vonderheide laboratory combines efforts in both basic research and clinical investigation to advance the understanding of tumor immunology and to develop novel immunotherapies for cancer. Dr. Vonderheide’s basic research includes deciphering the immunobiology of novel genetically engineered mouse models of cancer, including the regulation of immune surveillance and the tumor microenvironment by CD40 and other pathways, and with a focus on pancreatic cancer, breast cancer, and melanoma.