medical scientist training program

alumni profiles

We have over 450 program alumni, and we’re very proud of their accomplishments. To read profiles of some of our alumni, who are beyond residency, click on the links below:

Graduates of the 1970s | 1980s | 1990s | 2000s

And for info on residency placements of our most recent graduates, go to http://www.med.upenn.edu/mstp/matchlist.shtml

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1970s

Robert Barchi (Biochemistry, 1973) was the Provost and Chief Academic Officer of the University of Pennsylvania and is currently the President of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. His appointment as an administrator followed an illustrious career as a physician-scientist focusing on basic issues of neurobiology and clinical neurology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1993), Institute of Medicine (1993), Association of American Physicians, and the American Society for Clinical Investigation.
http://president.rutgers.edu/about-president-barchi/biography

Hal Weintraub (CAMB, 1973) was a distinguished faculty member of the Hutchinson Center in the Basic Sciences Division since 1978. In 1990 he was also appointed an investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He was a leading molecular biologist whose research advanced the understanding of cell development. His discoveries in genetic research helped establish the experimental framework for determining how undeveloped, embryonic cells become specialized cell types.
https://www.fhcrc.org/en/labs/basic-sciences/weintraub-award/weintraub-bio.html

Richard Goodman (Anatomy, 1976) is Professor of Medicine, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Oregon Health Sciences University and Director of the Vollum Institute. He is internationally acclaimed for his work on the regulation of gene expression and the intersection of the neural and endocrine systems. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (2002), Institute of Medicine (2005), and the American Society for Clinical Investigation (1986).
http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/research/centers-institutes/vollum/faculty/faculty-profile.cfm?facultyID=122

Mark Groudine (Anatomy, 1976) is Deputy Director and Executive Vice President of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is recognized for his groundbreaking studies of the basic biology of gene transcription and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (2001) and the Institute of Medicine (2003), as well as being a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006).
https://www.fhcrc.org/en/about/leadership/executive-vice-president-and-deputy-director-mark-groudine.html
http://sharedresources.fhcrc.org/profile/groudine-mark

Joseph Loscalzo (Biochemistry, 1977) is Chair of the Department of Medicine and the
Physician-in-Chief of Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He is the recipient of the Distinguished
Scientist Award from the American Heart Association (2004); a member of the Institute of
Medicine (2006), Association of American Physicians (1997), and the American Society for Clinical Investigation (1990); and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2013).
http://www.brighamandwomens.org/research/bri/bri_leaders/loscalzo.aspx
http://dms.hms.harvard.edu/BBS/fac/Loscalzo.php

 

1980s

Vanessa Northington-Gamble (History and Sociology of Science, 1983) is University Professor of Medical Humanities at George Washington University, the first woman and African American to receive this honor. She is an internationally recognized expert on the history of American medicine, racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care, cultural competence, and bioethics. She is also the author of several publications on the history of race and racism in American medicine, including the award winning Making a Place for Ourselves: The Black Hospital Movement: 1920- 1945. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (2005).
http://www.gwu.edu/~history/people/Gamble.cfm
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/changingthefaceofmedicine/physicians/biography_122.html

Gary Koretzky (Immunology, 1984) is Dean of the Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences and Senior Associate Dean for research at Weill Cornell Medical College. For over a decade, he served as the Associate Director for Penn’s MD-PhD program. He is an internationally renowned expert in immunology whose pioneering research contributions have improved the understanding of the development and function of immune system cells. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2012) and a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (1996), Association of American Physicians (1999), and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences (2008).
http://weill.cornell.edu/news/releases/wcmc/wcmc_2013/09_13_13.shtml

Gregg Semenza (Genetics, 1984) is Professor of Pediatrics and Director, Vascular Program, Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is recognized as an authority on hypoxia-induced genes, publishing in the highest profile journals and speaking at and/or organizing international symposia. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (2008), the Institute of Medicine (2012), Association of American Physicians (2008), and the American Society for Clinical Investigation (1995).
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/geneticmedicine/People/Faculty/semenza.html
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/institute_cell_engineering/experts/gregg_semenza.html

Gerard Vockley (Genetics, 1984) is Professor of Pediatrics and Chief of Medical Genetics at the University of Pittsburgh. He has received numerous awards for his studies of gene defects leading to pathologic conditions in children, and is a past president of the Society for Inherited Metabolic Diseases. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (1999).
http://www.chp.edu/CHP/Vockley,+Gerard,+MD,+PhD
http://www.chp.edu/CHP/gerard+vockley+research+projects

John Reed (Immunology, 1986) is Head of Pharma Research & Early Development at Roche, holder of over 90 patents and a founder or co-founder of several biotech companies. He has published well over 850 research papers, many describing seminal findings related to the biology of cell death as it relates to both normal biology and pathogenic states and is the inventor of Oblimersen sodium (Genasense), a DNA-based drug for cancer.
http://www.roche.com/about_roche/management/executive_committee/executive_committee-john-reed.htm

Mitch Weiss (CAMB, 1989) is the Arthur Nienhuis Endowed Chair in Hematology at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. For over a decade, he served as the Associate Director and Steering Committee member for Penn MSTP program. His research focuses on investigating how transcription factors control blood cell development. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (2003) and the Association of American Physicians (2012).
http://www.stjude.org/weiss


1990s

Diane Krause (CAMB, 1990) is Professor of Laboratory Medicine, Pathology and Cell Biology at Yale University; Associate Director of the Yale Stem Cell Center; and Director of the Clinical Cell Processing Laboratory. The overall goals of her research are to characterize bone marrow (BM) derived stem/progenitor cells, and to define the mechanisms that regulate the self-renewal and differentiation of these cells with the hopes that the findings can be translated to improved therapeutics. She was selected for a prestigious year-long leadership training program (2012-2013) for women in medicine called Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) at Drexel University.
http://bbs.yale.edu/people/diane_krause-2.profile
http://medicine.yale.edu/lab/krause/index.aspx

Jeannie Lee (CAMB, 1993) is Professor of Genetics and Pathology at Harvard Medical School and an HHMI Investigator. Her research focuses on mechanisms for inactivation and function of the X chromosome. She was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2010.
http://www.hhmi.org/research/investigators/lee_bio.html
http://molbio.mgh.harvard.edu/leeweb/people.htm

Ben Ho Park (Immunology, 1995) is Associate Professor of Oncology at Johns Hopkins University. The goal of his research is to discover and develop novel means for treating breast cancer.
http://cmm.jhu.edu/index.php?title=Ben_Ho_Park
https://jshare.johnshopkins.edu/bpark2/Park_Lab/index.htm

Kevin Volpp (Health Care Management, 1998) is Professor of Medicine and Health Care Management at the Medical School and Wharton Business School at the University of Pennsylvania. He also is the Director of the Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, Leonard Davis Institute. His work focuses on developing and testing innovative ways of applying insights from behavioral economics in improving patient health behavior and affecting provider performance. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (2008), Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences (2012) and the Association of American Physicians (2012).
https://hcmg.wharton.upenn.edu/profile/1527/
http://chibe.upenn.edu/people/kevin-volpp

Iris Zamir Jaffe (CAMB, 1999) is Associate Professor of Medicine at Tufts University, co-Director of the MCRC, and Chair of the Department of Medicine's Women in Medicine Committee. She is studying the molecular mechanisms for the protective effects of MR-antagonist drugs using in vitro, cell culture, and state-of-the art transgenic mouse models of vascular disease. She is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (2013).
http://mcri.tuftsmedicalcenter.org/StaffDirectory/PrincipalInvestigators/Iris.Jaffe
http://sackler.tufts.edu/Faculty-and-Research/Faculty-Profiles/Iris-Jaffe-Profile

 

2000s

Ralph DeBerardinis (CAMB, 2000) is Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics and is Director of the Division of Pediatric Genetics and Metabolism at the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. He studies how metabolism is regulated in cancer and other diseases. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (2013).
http://profiles.utsouthwestern.edu/profile/99018/ralph-deberardinis.html
http://www4.utsouthwestern.edu/mcdermottlab/deB/deB_index.htm

Luis Garza (CAMB, 2001) is Assistant Professor of Dermatology at Johns Hopkins University. He is studying skin stem cells and prostaglandins in regeneration and wound healing.
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/dermatology/about_us/our_experts/garza_luis.html

Dan Skovronsky (Neuroscience, 2001) is founder of Avid Radiopharmaceuticals. He led Avid's Florbetapir F18 compound from discovery through clinical development and commercial launch as the first FDA approved PET tracer for amyloid plaques. In 2010 Avid was acquired by Eli Lilly and Company. He serves as Avid's CEO and Vice President of Tailored Therapeutics at Eli Neuropathology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.
http://www.avidrp.com/aboutus/aboutus_management.php
http://interactive.snm.org/index.cfm?PageID=12252&A=11&B=454&E=409&task=bio&PresenterID=17599http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/25950/title/Supplement--Daniel-Skovronsky/

Joanna Phillips (Neuroscience, 2002) is Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery and Pathology at the University of California, San Francisco. Her research is focused on understanding how invading brain tumor cells interact with the components of the tumor microenvironment, and how these key interactions influence glioma initiation, progression, and invasion.
http://labmed.ucsf.edu/about/faculty/pathology-jphillips.html
http://cancer.ucsf.edu/people/profiles/phillips_joanna.3301

Carla Keirns (History and Sociology of Science, 2003) is Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Clinical Ethicist at Stony Brook University. Before Stony Brook, she was a postdoctoral fellow in health services research at the University of Michigan through the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. She has authored articles and book chapters in clinical ethics, health services research, and history of medicine, with a focus on health disparities, end of life care, chronic disease, epidemiologic transitions and public health ethics.
http://www.stonybrook.edu/bioethics/keirns.shtml

Susan Moody (CAMB, 2005) is Instructor of Medicine at Harvard University. Her research focuses on drug resistance and potential new breast cancer treatments.
http://doctors.dana-farber.org/directory/profile.asp?pict_id=6733362
https://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/profiles/profile/person/54813

Tessa Cook (Bioengineering, 2007) is Assistant Professor of Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include radiology informatics, radiation dose monitoring, advanced image processing and radiology education. She is the principal developer of RADIANCE, a free, open-source dose monitoring software for CT, which was released worldwide in 2010. She is also the fellowship director for the new Penn Radiology Informatics Fellowship.
http://www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g334/p18472
http://www.tessacook.com/index.html

Michael Higley (Neuroscience, 2007) is Assistant Professor of Neurobiology at Yale University. His research looks at how the integrative properties of single neurons and local circuits support the processing, storage, and retrieval of information in healthy individuals and during the cognitive decline associated with neuropsychiatric disease.
http://higleylab.med.yale.edu/

Christopher Vakoc (CAMB, 2007) is Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. He investigates how chromatin regulatory proteins participate in the pathogenesis of cancer.
http://www.cshl.edu/Faculty/vakoc-chris.html

 

And for info on residency placements of our most recent graduates, go to http://www.med.upenn.edu/mstp/matchlist.shtml