Department of Psychiatry
Penn Behavioral Health

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Penn Psychiatry In the News

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2009

James C. Coyne, MD is quoted in a New York Times article discussing the suggested health benefits of an optimistic attitude. The article was also posted by AARP Bulletin.
Click for article - New York Times

David Dinges, PhD, chief of the division of Sleep and Chronobiology, is quoted in a Boston Globe article examining why some people can function with little sleep, while others require eight or more hours.
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A WHYY report looks at the challenges that pregnant women with medical conditions face, to balance their own health needs with those of the fetus. Deborah Kim, MD and C. Neill Epperson, MD were interviewed in the report, discussing the impact of mood disorders and medications on pregnant women and their fetuses.
Click for article - Dr. Kim interview
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- Dr. Epperson web chat

Daniel D. Langleben, MD was quoted in a Washington Times article regarding recent studies performed by scientists from the University of Zurich which used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to tell whether someone intends to keep a promise.
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The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that autism affects about 1 in every 110 American children, a 57 percent increase over the last estimate in 2002, according to a report released last week by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Penn and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are part of a national study, funded by the CDC, which aims to determine the causes of autism.
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David Sarwer, PhD, associate professor of Psychology in Psychiatry and Surgery, is interviewed in a Forbes.com article which notes that risk-averse, depressed people have worse outcomes after many operations.
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Research by Charles O'Brien, MD, PhD, Joe Volpicelli, MD, PhD, and Penn colleagues at the VA Medical Center, which led to the discovery, FDA approvals, and widespread use of naltrexone to treat alcoholism, was highlighted in TIME magazine's "The Year in Health, A-Z".
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Deborah Kim, MD was quoted in a Fort Worth Star-Telegram article reporting on transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy (TMS), one of psychiatry's newest tools in the treatment of severe depression that is unresponsive to medication.
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Mark Salzer, PhD, director and principal investigator of the Penn Collaborative and an associate professor of Psychiatry, is interviewed in a WHYY radio segment about the approach to mental health known as the recovery model, which stresses patient autonomy and quality of life, instead of merely controlling symptoms.
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In it's "Top 10 Medical Breakthroughs of the year", TIME magazine notes that, while the cause of autism and the recent rise in cases is still unclear, researchers and geneticists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia this year identified one possible genetic clue.
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James Coyne, PhD was quoted in an article in Psychology Today's "In the Trenches" blog. The article tells of how the field of neuropsychology has advanced our understanding of the brain and its neuroplastic ability to change structurally by interactions, thoughts and actions.
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The New York Times interviews A. Thomas McLellan, PhD, former professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and co-founder of the Treatment Research Institute (TRI), about his new role as deputy director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy.
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Kelly Allison, PhD, assistant professor of Psychology in Psychiatry, is interviewed in a CBS 3 segment on night eating. Allison notes that Penn's Center for Weight and Eating Disorders is conducting a study testing whether a drug can help regulate serotonin levels and correct Night Eating Syndrome.

Andrea Spivak, RD, LDN, a registered dietitian with the Stunkard Weight Management Program, was quoted in an article in the Delaware News Journal, which looks at the increased focus on vitamin D, spurred by several medical studies that have found the vitamin may play a more important role in the body than scientists ever thought.
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Stephen J. Morse, professor of law and psychiatry, was quoted in a New York Times article regarding the mental competence to stand trial of the man charged with the kidnapping of Elizabeth Smart.
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Adrian Raine, DPhil, PIK professor of Criminology, Psychiatry and Psychology, who applies neuroscience techniques to study the causes and cures of crime, was quoted in a Wall Street Journal article discussing biological traits of psychopathic killers.
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David Dinges, PhD, chief of the Division of Sleep and Chronobiology, was quoted in an article in New Scientist regarding the relationship between sleep and memory.
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Annie Steinberg, MD, clinical associate professor of Psychiatry, was quoted in an article in the Philadelphia Inquirer, which looks at a young man's struggle with crime and mental illness.
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Governor Ed Rendell presents Pennsylvania's autism census, the first such report in the nation, on the Pennsylvania Cable Network, mentioning that the census was done by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, including David S. Mandell, ScD and Lindsay Lawer, MS.

Anthony Fabricatore, PhD, assistant professor of Psychology in Psychiatry in the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, discusses dietary techniques to help put diabetics on track in a multi-story supplement on diabetes appearing today in the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News.
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According to a new study by Adrian Raine, D.Phil., PIK professor of Criminology, Psychiatry and Psychology and Yu Gao, PhD, research associate in the department of Criminology, poor fear conditioning at the tender age of 3 can predispose that person to break the law as an adult. Coverage has appeared in the New Scientist, Reuters, HealthDay, Los Angles Times blog, and CBS television stations in Philadelphia and New York, among others.
Click for article - HealthDay
Click for article - Reuters

Kelly Allison, PhD, assistant professor of Psychology in Psychiatry, is interviewed in a CBS 2 (New York) segment on night eating.

A Boston Globe article highlights a new study in the American Journal of Psychiatry which suggests that young children who display abnormal fear responses might be predisposed to later criminal activity. Through their testing, Yu Gao, Adrian Raine, D.Phil., and colleagues found that children with poor fear responses were twice as likely to become criminals as those who showed normal responses.
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Michael Perlis, PhD, Behavioral Sleep Medicine expert and associate professor of Psychology in Psychiatry, is quoted in an Associated Press article discussing the placebo effect and its relationship with conditioning.

Andrea Spivack, RD, LDN, medical nutrition therapist and David Sarwer, PhD, director, of the Stunkard Weight Management Program, comment in a Prevention.com article on what people can do to make up for last night’s dinner.
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Andrea Spivack, MA, RD, LDN, Medical Nutrition Therapist with the Stunkard Weight Management Program, is quoted in a CBS 3 segment about a new burrito diet, noting that with the right kind of ingredients, the burrito diet can be a sensible plan.

Failed dieters may be pushed to over-eat not by their stomachs, but by their brains, according to an Inside Science News article in which Charles O'Brien, MD, PhD is quoted.
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In a Philadelphia Inquirer article about a missing local woman who suffers from bipolar disorder, Christos Ballas, MD, clinical assistant professor of Psychiatry, spoke of the possible effects of mixing alcohol with standard bipolar medications.
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Director of the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness, C. Neill Epperson, MD, speaks with 6 ABC reporter and new mom Erin O'Hearn about some of the challenges associated with returning to work after maternity leave.
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A Penn Medicine study showed that enrolling in a weight loss program with a family member or friend appears to help African-Americans shed more pounds, but only if the involved partner attends sessions frequently or also loses weight. The research, led by Shiriki Kumanyiki, PhD, MPH, professor of Epidemiology in conjunction with Tom Wadden, PhD and published this week in the Archives of Internal Medicine, was mentioned by HealthDay and on several Fox and NBC affiliates.
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An article in USA Today highlights research by Tanja V.E. Kral, PhD, research assistant professor of Nutrition in Psychiatry presented at the annual meeting of the Obesity Society. The findings show that if you offer kids more fruits and vegetables before and during meals, they'll eat more of them.
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The research of Michael Perlis, PhD, Allen Pack, MD, PhD, Amita Sehgal, PhD, Susan Harbison, PhD, and Marcos Frank, PhD is highlighted in the Science News article "The Why of Sleep". The piece talks about how studies in humans and animal models reveal the multi-purposes of sleep.
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Michael Perlis, PhD is quoted in the Science News article, "Sleep Gone Awry," which looks at causes and cures of sleep disorders.
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David F. Dinges, PhD, chief of the Division of Sleep and Chronobiology; and lab technician Christopher Jones are highlighted in the Science News article, "Dying to Sleep," which looks at new data about sleep’s benefits, suggesting that losing sleep might speed up death’s arrival or increase the risk of losing health.
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David F. Dinges, PhD was quoted in an article on Forbes.com, regarding the role of genes in sleep regulation and duration.
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Mark Salzer, PhD was featured on Dr. Dan Gottlieb's Voices in the Family: Living with Mental Illness on WHYY Radio. Dr. Salzer highlighted new mental illness initiatives, including a program he's involved with at Horizon House, called Education Plus, which provides supports for college students with serious mental illnesses.
Click for clip

Anna Childress, PhD was quoted in an article that ran in a dozen McClatchy newspapers, looking at the effects of dopamine, a natural brain chemical that's linked to pleasure, addiction and disease.
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Charles O'Brien, MD, PhD and Kyle Kampman, MD were quoted in articles from The New York Times and Associated Press, respectively, which reported that the vaccine-like shots developed to keep cocaine abusers from getting high also helped them fight their addiction in the first successful rigorous study of this approach to treating illicit drug use.
Click for article - New York Times

Caryn Lerman, PhD is quoted in a Globe and Mail (Toronto) article about whether stress can cause cancer, or even hasten a patient's death. New clues in this complicated puzzle emerged this week when researchers revealed a study, published in Cancer Prevention Research, that showed mice living in stressful conditions developed much larger cancerous tumors than those living in relatively stable conditions.
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Advice from Elna Yadin, PhD, coordinator of the Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Clinic of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety, is featured in a Philadelphia Inquirer story about people coping with hoarding, which is a type of obsessive compulsive disorder.

Philly.com notes that a Doylestown-based nonprofit organization ADHD Aware will hold its inaugural symposium on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder this fall as an educational opportunity for parents and the community. Russell Ramsay, PhD will speak at the Symposium about ADHD research and participate in a question-and-answer session with the audience.

EarthySky reports, David Dinges, PhD is working with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute to develop a test to help astronauts in space gauge their own stress and fatigue. This simple test could help astronauts gauge their fitness for performing critical tasks and could also be used in a number of contexts on Earth to evaluate ability to perform.
Click for interview

John O'Reardon, MD was interviewed on a WHYY Radio segment regarding a new nationwide study which uses brain imaging to test patients' response to an anti-depressant one week after they started taking it.
Click for segment

Trevor Hadley, PhD is featured in a WHYY Radio segment discussing how the passing of the mental health parity act last year fits into the health care reform discussions.
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Michael Perlis, PhD appears in a USA Today article, regarding treatment of insomnia and the benefits of using behavioral therapy in this treatment.
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Steven Arnold, MD was quoted in a Philadelphia Magazine web site article on Alzheimer's disease treatment in Philadelphia. The article, which features Penn programs including the Penn Memory Center and the Ralston Penn Center, states that "Penn is so in the forefront in research that it wouldn't be surprising if a cure for Alzheimer's or a breakthrough understanding of what causes the deterioration of brain cells in Parkinson’s disease came from these labs."
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Robert Schnoll, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry and a member of the Abramson Cancer Center, was quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer article regarding smoking cessation.
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The New York Times notes that a new Army program, which will require that all 1.1 million of its soldiers take intensive training in emotional resiliency, is based in part on the ideas of Aaron Beck, MD, Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry, and the late Albert Ellis, who found that mentally disputing unexamined thoughts and assumptions often defuses them. The program is being led by a group of Penn psychologists from the Positive Psychology Center.
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In a Science News article, David Dinges, PhD commented on sleep study findings that appeared in the most recent issue of Science. The study shows a genetic variation that appears to reduce the need for sleep.
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A. Thomas McLellan, PhD, an adjunct professor of psychology in Psychiatry, was confirmed by the Senate last week as deputy director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, which advises the president and coordinates anti-drug efforts. McLellan will be charged with reducing the nation's demand for drugs, according to a Philadelphia Inquirer article.
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Phil Gehrman, PhD, CBSM, assistant professor of Psychiatry and Clinical Director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine program at the University of Pennsylvania discussed insomnia with Dr. Dan Gottlieb's Voices in the Family on WHYY.
Click for clip

Teri Franklin, PhD, research assistant professor of Psychiatry at Penn's Addiction Treatment Research Center, was quoted in a Time.com article regarding addiction and the anticraving medication, baclofenis.
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In a Time magazine article, Ruben Gur, PhD, director of Penn's Brain Behavior Laboratory, discussed the limitations of functional-magnetic-resonance-imaging (fMRI) in lie detection.
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Lucy Faulconbridge, PhD, of Penn's Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, was the lead author of a study which found that both depression and obesity may increase risk of heart disease and stroke. Dr. Faulconbridge presented these findings at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB). The story has aired on FOX stations in California, Texas and Mississippi.

USA Today reports that, in these stressful times, nearly 30% of the U.S. population complains of disturbed sleep patterns and sales of sleep medications are on the rise. Michael Perlis, PhD was quoted in the article discussing treatment of insomnia.
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Siobhan Banks, PhD was quoted in a Men's Health article discussing the costs associated with inadequate sleep, including an increased risk of obesity and type-2 diabetes.
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The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania has been ranked #8 on this year's Honor Roll of Best Hospitals in America by US News and World Report, up from #10 last year. HUP is one of only 21 hospitals in the nation to receive a score that was considered "best of the best" by the publication. Of the 16 specialties ranked by US News, HUP rose in the rankings, overall, in 9 areas this year: Digestive Disorders, Ear, Nose and Throat, Heart and Heart Surgery, Neurology and Neurosurgery, Orthopaedics, Psychiatry, Rehabilitation, Rheumatology and Urology.
Click for segment - MSNBC News Live

Phil Gehrman, an assistant professor of Psychiatry and sleep specialist at the University of Pennsylvania, was quoted in a USA Today article regarding a rare sleep disorder, called non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome.
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Pennsylvania Hospital Director of Volunteer Services, Eileen Murphy and Marion Conneen, OT R/L, occupational therapist on one of two behavioral health units at Pennsylvania Hospital, are quoted in the Philadelphia Business Journal on the use of pet therapy programs, specifically on psychiatric units.
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The nurses on the addiction unit at Penn-Presbyterian have been recognized for their extraordinary work in helping addicts on their road to recovery and regaining their lives as the featured cover story of this month's ADVANCE for Nurses magazine. Featured in the article are nurse manager Margorie H. Lehigh, MHA, MHEd, BSN, RN, CHES, Miriam P. Yorkman, BSN, RN, CARN, and David Childs, a former addict so grateful for his treatment at PPMC that he is now a part of the addiction unit team as an alumni volunteer.
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Congressional Quarterly Researcher interviews Mark Salzer, PhD and Trevor Hadley, PhD in an article on depression, which looks at increased incidence of depression, access to treatments, and policy issues regarding serious mental health issues.
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MSNBC.com notes that the recession has dealt a lot of low blows in the past several months, but none so devastating, perhaps, as forcing adults to do the unthinkable: move back in with mom and dad. In this article, Marion Lindblad-Goldberg, PhD, clinical professor of psychology in Psychiatry, describes how adults who go through a job loss, home foreclosure or other financial hardship often feel infantilized.
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In continued coverage, WHYY follows a patient of John O'Reardon, MD, who is part of a study testing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for depression. Dr. O’Reardon notes that half of the people who are participating in the study will have their devices turned on, the other half will not. The blinded phase will last 16 weeks, and after that, every patient’s device will be turned on so that they can experience the potential benefits of the procedure.
Click for article

In a St. Petersburg Times (Fla.) article about self-control, Anna Rose Childress, PhD notes that the same parts of the brain that light up whenever anyone battling a substance addiction spots a favorite drug can also turn on when we snack and self-medicate with junk food. "Our brains are hard-wired to appreciate and pursue natural rewards such as food and sex because of their critical survival value," she said.
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Thomas Wadden, PhD comments in an article on Oprah.com about weight loss, noting that losing just 10 percent of your body weight is easier to attain and maintain, setting you up for success in the long run and is also associated with a myriad of health benefits.

Siobhan Banks, PhD, a research assistant professor in the department of Psychiatry, is quoted in articles from Reuters and Voice of America about how failure to get a full night's sleep can lead to weight gain or compromise the beneficial effects of a reduced calorie diet on total body fat.
Click for article - Reuters

Arthur Robinson Williams, MBE, fourth year medical student, and Daniel Langleben, MD co-wrote an article appearing on ScienceProgress.org that delves into the ongoing mortgage crisis and the neurobiology of social cooperation.
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Researchers launched the Early Autism Risk Longitudinal Investigation (EARLI), a comprehensive study to track families with an autistic child through another pregnancy, birth, and the following three years. According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, the local portion of the study will be led by Drexel and by the Center for Autism Research, a collaboration between Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania.
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A genetic link between anxiety, depression and insomnia has been identified by Penn researchers, who said adolescents who suffer from anxiety and depression should also be screened for insomnia. Findings from this research, led by Philip Gehrman, PhD, CBSM were reported in a HealthDay article posted by US News and World Report. Additional coverage appeared on Fox affiliates in Philadelphia and San Antonio.
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Multiple outlets report that watching TV before bed could be getting in the way of a person's ability to get a good night's sleep. Research led by Mathias Basner, MD, MS, MSc and David F. Dinges, PhD, found that Americas spent almost half of their last two waking hours of each day watching the TV. Coverage appeared in the Los Angeles Times, US News and World Report via HealthDay, and on NBC, Fox and CBS television and radio stations around the country.
Click for article - Los Angeles Times
Click for article - US News and World Report
Click for article - NY Post

WebMD reports that a new weight loss drug looks good in late-stage clinical trials presented by Thomas Wadden, PhD. The drug works in the hypothalamus, the brain's central thermostat that controls appetite, temperature, and how the body burns energy.
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Jason Karlawish, MD is featured in an ABCNews.com article discussing treatment of Alzheimer's disease and weighing in on certain myths about the disease.
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Penn Medicine psychiatrist Steven Marc Sokoll, MD, writes a letter to the editor of the New York Times, regarding an earlier Op-Ed article, "Growing Old With Autism," by Karl Taro Greenfeld.
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Steven Arnold, MD is quoted in a Medpage Today article which notes that, according a New England Journal of Medicine article by researchers from the University of Cambridge in England, the pathological features of Alzheimer's disease may not be as representative of clinical dementia in the very old as in the younger elderly.
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The fact that celebrities such as Kirstie Alley and Oprah Winfrey, who have financial resources most Americans don't have, still can't lose weight and keep it off shows what a formidable challenge it is, says Thomas Wadden, PhD in a USA Today article. Unfortunately, yo-yo dieting is probably the most common outcome of efforts to lose weight, says Wadden.
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Steve Arnold, MD, Director of the Alzheimer's Disease Center, was featured on WHYY's Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane discussing Alzheimer's disease.
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The Transcranial-Magnetic Stimulation program run by John O'Reardon, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry, was mentioned in Dan Gottlieb's mental-health column in the Philadelphia Inquirer.
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David Mandell, ScD was featured in a story on Chicago's WBBM radio, which notes that studies in recent years have shown consistently that the age of diagnosis and the services provided early on can make all the difference when treating children with autism.

A New York Post article discussing brain scan technology reports that Adrian Raine, D. Phil. has found that violent criminals and sexual offenders often have specific dysfunctional areas in the frontal areas of their brain.
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WHYY Radio notes that Penn Medicine is one of five locations nation-wide where a treatment called "Deep Brain Stimulation" or DBS is studied for its effectiveness with treatment-resistant depression. John O'Reardon, MD is interviewed in a story about this study. WHYY Radio also follows a patient from the University of Pennsylvania study throughout the DBS surgery and recovery process.
Click for article
- WHYY DBS for depression story
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- WHYY Chronic Depression story

David Dinges, PhD and Amita Sehgal, PhD are quoted in a ScienceNOW Daily News article, regarding a new brain-imaging study that gives surprising new insights into how the brain manages the urge to sleep and wake. The results, sleep researchers say, may improve predictions of when people are most at risk for drowsy accidents.
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David Dinges, PhD is interviewed in a Men's Health story about sleep efficiency. Sleep "stabilizes your waking brain, makes you more alert, and allows you to process information faster," says Dr. Dinges. "It helps you remember things and consolidate those memories."
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Anthony Rostain, MD is featured in an article from the Delaware News Journal, which looks at ADHD in adults. About 8 million adults, or 4 percent of the US adult population live with ADHD, a developmental disorder characterized by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.
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David Sarwer, PhD is quoted in an MSNBC.com article describing the increasingly important role that image is playing for job seekers in the current economy. "For hiring managers, it's clearly a buyer's market," he said. "They can be more selective...not only hold out for the most qualified but the person who's the most physically attractive."
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A. Thomas McLellan, PhD often cited as the nation's top researcher on drug addiction and treatment, will be nominated as the nation's No. 2 drug czar, according to a Friday announcement from President Obama. If confirmed by the Senate, McLellan will be deputy director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, which advises the president and coordinates anti-drug efforts. Observers say his appointment will re-focus efforts from arrests and jail time to the best ways to treat addiction, and hence, reduce demand for drugs and the crime it engenders. Coverage of his new role has appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Washington Post, the Chicago Tribune, and the Daily Pennsylvanian.
Click for article - Philadelphia Inquirer
Click for article - Washington Post
Click for article - Daily Pennsylvanian
Click for article - White House announcement

David S. Mandell, ScD speaks with the Florida Times-Union regarding a 2005 Penn study which found that nearly one in five autistic children among a sample of 156 children with autism studied had been physically abused; about one in six had been sexually abused. Mandell said the research underscored the importance of vigilance on the part of therapists and doctors for signs of abuse.
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Elna Yadin, PhD discusses obsessive-compulsive disorder in a Health Magazine article, describing when an habit becomes a health problem. "People with OCD have intrusive, upsetting thoughts that make them feel anxious. And they use their compulsions, whether it's checking the stove or washing their hands, to relieve the anxiety - so the illness becomes self perpetuating."
Click for article

Deborah Kim, MD commented in a Jewish Exponent article which questions whether Nadya Suleman - the California woman in whom six embryos were implanted, one of which split, and who is already the mother of six young children - rationally decided to have kids, because she was an only child, she always felt lonely, and as such, wanted a large family of her own.

Lisa Maslankowski, MD, lead researcher of the HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Division's Microbicide Trials Unit, is quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer article looking at the challenges of microbicide trials. In a field hampered by false starts and disappointing results so far, Dr. Maslankowski said positive results from a trial of a microbicide called PRO2000 "is the first time we've seen any signal of effectiveness, so this is very exciting for the field."
Click for article

In continued coverage, WABC New York highlights Penn Medicine research on transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for depression. Researchers say the stimulation reactivates parts of the brain that regulate mood. "The beauty of it is we can do it noninvasively in the doctor's office without needing sedation, with the patient able to resume normal activities immediately" said John O'Reardon, MD.
Click for article

David Dinges, PhD speaks with the New York Times and notes that devices worn on the wrist to keep track of motion have long been common in sleep laboratories. "They’ve been used in science for a long time. Now they are transitioning to the consumer market," he said.
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Charles O'Brien, MD, PhD tells USA Today that many might be surprised to learn what constitutes at-risk drinking, in an article regarding a "Rethinking Drinking" website developed by experts at National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) (RethinkingDrinking.niaaa.nih.gov). The website was created to help people who drink alcoholic beverages determine what type of drinker they are and whether they are at a risk for developing a drinking problem.
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As more teenagers express interest in undergoing cosmetic surgery, researchers are asking critical questions about their motives, issues and whether young people are even equipped to make informed decisions regarding what are often permanent changes to their appearance. David Sarwer, PhD speaks with Modern Medicine and observes that adolescents and young adults are interested in changing their bodies at a point in their development during which their beliefs and attitudes are often most nascent and confused.
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Steven Siegel, MD, PhD is quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer article about a new television show that's lead character has dissociative identity disorder (DID). Dr. Siegel says "I don't believe [DID] is an illness. It's fabricated by the psychiatric establishment and propagated by people who hear about it" from pop culture.
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Ruben C. Gur, PhD discussed the act of lying in an article from the Washington Post, noting that neurological research is showing that lies are so interwoven into our central nervous systems that it's not even an unnatural act. Dr. Gur and his research partner Daniel Langleben, MD have learned to use short films of the brain, called "functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging," to detect lies.
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John O'Reardon, MD appeared on a news story which aired on WKBT-TV CH 8 (CBS) in Wisconsin, discussing transcranial magnetic stimulation, a treatment recently cleared by the FDA for people struggling to emerge from depression.
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Lisa A. Maslankowski, MD was quoted in an article from The Philadelphia Bulletin, which notes that a gel designed to prevent HIV infection has proven promising, according to researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The microbicide gel, called PRO 2000, is a gel designed to prevent HIV infection in women and was found to be 30 percent effective, according to results from a clinical trial.

An article in USA Today looks at attraction, that unexplained magnetism that draws people together, possibly leading to love. "What we see as attractive is a byproduct of not only our biological wiring, but is also influenced by socio-cultural factors," says David Sarwer, PhD.
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Lisa A. Maslankowski, MD, principal investigator of HPTN 035 and lead researcher of the HIV/AIDS Prevention Research Division's Microbicide Trials Unit at the University of Pennsylvania was quoted in a Penn Medicine News article, regarding results of a clinical trial which is the first human clinical study to suggest that a microbicide gel may prevent male-to-female sexual transmission of HIV infection.
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Gregory K. Brown, PhD, was quoted in an article in The Philadelphia Inquirer, which looks for reasons why suicides in Philadelphia rose sharply last year, a disturbing statistic that experts say they are trying to understand.
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Geoffrey Neimark, MD, Resident in Psychiatry, provides insight on working with patients with schizophrenia in the latest issue of Rolling Stone. The in-depth analysis of the pharmaceutical industry - particularly Eli Lilly and its marketing of the atypical antipsychotic drug Zyprexa - is part of a series of epic stories for the magazine by Philadelphia-based writer, Ben Wallace-Wells. Dr. Neimark also comments on the marketing practices of pharmaceutical companies, warning that "the advertising has consequences. Everyone comes to doctors expecting cures."

Steven Morse is quoted in a Wall Street Journal article about how experimental neural scans, brain-wave memory probes and other controversial techniques have found their way into scores of criminal proceedings, where judges usually are left on their own to assess its scientific validity.
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Caryn Lerman, PhD is quoted in a WHYY TV "Delaware Tonight" segment discussing the genetic underpinnings of nicotine addiction, which her research shows plays a role in why some people have concentration and other cognitive problems when trying to quit smoking.

Ruben C. Gur, PhD is featured in a History Channel special on the Seven Deadly Sins, in an episode dedicated to anger. Dr. Gur explains that "once there is a perception of danger, there is a cascade of responses in the body that include changes in heart rate, in blood pressure, in sweating. It makes your body ready to fight or flee."
Click for clip

Caryn Lerman, PhD was a guest on WHYY’s Radio Times, where she discussed her new study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, finding that some smokers may be genetically prone to concentration and memory problems during quitting attempts.
Click for clip

Monthly injections of an extended-release version of the alcohol dependence drug naltrexone improve quality of life for alcohol-dependent patients, a study shows. A 6-month treatment course of the drug "improved general health, physical and social functioning, and overall mental health," lead investigator Helen M. Pettinati, PhD told Reuters Health. "It was clear that individuals who had reduced their drinking with extended-release naltrexone were those that showed improvements in quality of life."

 

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