Department of Psychiatry

Penn Behavioral Health

Penn Psychiatry in the News 2014

Many people want to help a school or community overwhelmed by a mass-shooting event. Steven Berkowitz, MD, associate professor of Clinical Psychiatry and director of Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery, outlines a series of effective ways to respond.

 

Marcel Bonn-Miller, PhD, adjunct assistant professor in the department of Psychiatry and leader of the Substance Abuse and Anxiety Program for the U.S. Veterans Affairs Department, commented in an Associated Press article about medical marijuana research.

 

HealthDay reports on a new Penn Medicine study in the journal Sleep, led by Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, MSc, assistant professor of sleep and chronobiology in Psychiatry, that suggests that pushing back work start times could help combat chronic sleep loss. The Huffington Post, Self magazine, The Atlantic, Live Science, Examiner, De Telegraaf, daily mail (UK), dailyRx, Medical Daily, Scienceblogs.com, and Vox also covered the research.

 

A new study from Penn Medicine researchers, including Michael B. Blank, PhD, associate professor in Psychiatry and co-director of the Penn Mental Health AIDS Research Center, published in AIDS Patient Care and STDs found that the mentally ill are more likely to be tested for HIV, reports the Examiner. The study was also covered by CBS Johnstown, Medical Daily, and PsychCentral.

 

A team led by Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, David F. Dinges, PhD, and Ruben Gur, PhD has developed a test battery to measure the impact of space flight on brain function.

 

A new study from the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Nicotine Addiction, led by James Loughead, PhD, associate professor of Psychiatry, and Caryn Lerman, PhD, a professor of Psychiatry and deputy director of the Abramson Cancer Center, found that the brain’s self-control center may predict the chance of relapse after an attempt to quit smoking, reportsFoxNews.com.  The Oregonian, Medical News Today, the Daily Mail, Medical Daily, the Utah People’s Post, Maine News,Tech Times, and newscasts on NBC, CBS and Fox affiliates in over 30 cities also covered the research.

 

David F. Dinges, PhD, professor and chief, division of Sleep and Chronobiology, department of Psychiatry, appeared in National Geographic's "Sleepless in America" documentary. 

 

Michael A. Grandner, PhD, an instructor of Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, commented in a hercampus.com article looking at the impact of excessive caffeine intake on a college student. Dr. Grandner also spoke with Health.com about how to maximize the benefits from sleep.

 

David F. Dinges, PhD, professor and chief of the division of Sleep and Chronobiology, spoke with ScienceInsider about research investigating the toll exhaustion takes on human performance in high-stakes situations, including flying airplanes.

 

Ruben Gur, PhD, professor of Psychology, was interviewed in a Philadelphia Inquirer article about multitasking and how it can pump up anxiety levels, increase errors, reduce attention spans, and affect working memory.

 

A research round-up from the Daily Pennsylvanian reports on a study, led by Rinad Beidas, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry, and Kathryn Schmitz, PhD, MPH, professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, which found that a specific exercise regiment reduced symptoms of lymphedema, a swelling of the upper body after breast cancer treatment.

 

In a Physicians Weekly article about a recent study assessing the long-term effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention weight loss program for type 2 diabetes patients, Thomas A. Wadden, PhD, director of Penn’s Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, said "our results provide new hope that long-term weight loss is possible when people make a long-term commitment to meet with a lifestyle counselor."

 

Jacqueline Hudak, PhD, LMFT, clinical director of the Center for Couples and Adult Families, discusses family during the holiday season with the Chicago Tribune

 

The Daily Pennsylvanian reports that researchers at Penn Medicine, led by Heath Schmidt, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry, have found a connection between protein modification and cocaine relapse in rats.

 

Jacqueline Hudak, PhD, LMFT, clinical director of the Center for Couples and Adult Families at the University of Pennsylvania, spoke with WHYY about working with parents of addicted children.

 

Thomas A. Wadden, PhD, director of Penn’s Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, was quoted in a WHYY NewsWorks story about a new Penn research review in JAMA finding that Medicare may need to expand its options for behavioral weight loss counseling providers in primary care settings. DailyRx, MedPage Today, Medscape, Clinical Endocrinology News, Utah People's Post and Diabetes Insider also covered the review findings.

 

Raquel Gur, MD, PhD, director of the Neuropsychiatry program spoke with the Philadelphia Inquirer about the development of schizophrenia. Gur's husband, Ruben Gur, PhD, director of Neuropsychology is also mentioned.

 

Crave magazine features a Q and A with Michael A. Grandner, PhD, instructor of Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, on the relationship between food and sleep. 

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that a team of Penn Medicine researchers, led by Raquel Gur, MD, PhD, director of the Neuropsychiatry Program, is trying to figure out how to identify and begin earlier treatment of young people with schizophrenia.

 

A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, including lead author Heath Schmidt, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry and co-author, R. Christopher Pierce, PhD, professor of Neuroscience in Psychiatry, has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction.

 

Michael A. Grandner, PhD, instructor of psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology is featured in Oprah Winfrey Network’s (OWN) series on tips for better sleep.

 

The Seattle Times spoke with Steven Berkowitz, MD, associate professor of Clinical Psychiatry and director of Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery, in response to yet another school shooting outside Seattle. 

 

In a Yahoo! Health article on the five ways stress can affect your health, Tracy Bale, PhD, of the department of Psychiatry and the School of Veterinary Medicine, commented on how stress can shrink your brain, throw off your gut bacteria, lower your sperm count or make you crave junk food.

 

James Coyne, PhD, behavioral science researcher and professor of Psychology at Penn Medicine, was quoted in a New York Times story on eccentric Harvard psychology researcher, Ellen Langer. Langer's studies have centered around the belief that the expectation of aging directly correlates with the physiological signs of health.

 

Raquel E. Gur, MD, PhD, director of the Neuropsychiatry Program, is interviewed by O, The Oprah Magazine about Penn Medicine research that used brain imaging to map the connectomes in 949 subjects ages 8 to 22. 

 

Mahendra Bhati, MD, assistant professor of Psychiatry, was interviewed in a 6ABC story looking into concerns that the multi-million dollar NFL concussion settlement may not cover the neurological illnesses that affect many players due to head trauma from repeated hits.

 

David Sarwer, PhD, professor of Psychology in Psychiatry and Surgery, was interviewed in a MarketWatch.com article about the increase in cosmetic procedures among people over the age of 55.

 

Child and adolescent psychiatrist Steven Berkowitz, MD, director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery, spoke with Washington, D.C. radio station WTOP about helping children through grief.

 

Delaware News Journal article about healthy eating included comments from Andrea Spivack, MA, RD, LDN, dietitian in the Albert J. Stunkard Weight Management Program.

 

Anthony L. Rostain, MD, MS, professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, was interviewed on Attention Talk Radio about ADHD stimulant medications in the context of addiction. 

 

An NPR story about the power of positive self-talk featured David Sarwer, PhD, professor of Psychology and director of clinical services at the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, who said that a mirror is one of the first tools he uses with some new patients.

 

In continuing coverage of a Penn Medicine study on marijuana use and sleep quality, Michael A. Grandner, PhD, an instructor of psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, appeared on RadioMD’s “Staying Well with Melanie Cole, MS.” 

 

An NPR story about the stigma associated with being formerly obese included comments from David Sarwer, PhD, professor of Psychology and director of clinical services at the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, about how these issues may manifest in a romantic relationship.

 

BBC documentary turned to research by Ruben Gur, PhD, professor of Psychology, and Ragini Verma, PhD, research assistant professor in Radiology, that delves into differences between the male and female brain. 

 

Kelly Allison, PhD, associate professor of psychology at the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, comments in a Los Angeles Times article about the challenging journey of weightloss and common ways dieters sabotage their own efforts.

 

Lindsay Sortor, PsyD, clinical psychologist in the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness spoke with NBCNews.com about the risk for depression and anxiety disorders for women who can't get pregnant.

 

An NIMH news bulletin reports on research grants aimed at developing effective, real-world-ready approaches to providing early diagnosis, treatment, and supportive services for people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including research led byEdward S. Brodkin, MD, Director, Adult Autism Spectrum Program at Penn Medicine and Associate Professor of Psychiatry.

 

David F. Dinges, PhD, professor and chief of the division of Sleep and Chronobiology was interviewed in a Huffington Post article about scientific evidence suggesting that consuming caffeine just before taking a short nap does a better job of restoring your alertness than does simply having a cup of coffee or tea or taking a nap without taking caffeine first.

 

Michael E. Thase, MD, professor of Psychiatry, commented to Reuters Health about a JAMA Psychiatry study which suggests that for about a third of people with depression, adding cognitive therapy to treatment with antidepressant medication helps them reach remission and recovery quicker.

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports on recent research, led by Daniel Weintraub, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry and Neurology, showing that Parkinson's patients were disproportionately likely to have depression, anxiety, and apathy when diagnosed and throughout the two-year period of the study. Dr. Weintraub was also interviewed in a Psychiatric News report on research showing that Parkinson's patients who had been on at least one type of dopamine-related medication for at least one year experienced higher rates of impulse control problems and daytime sleepiness than patients not on dopamine therapy.

 

Charles O’Brien, MD, PhD, addiction psychiatrist and founder of the Center for Studies of Addiction, talks about the importance of treating alcoholism and depression simultaneously in an article from the Huffington Post

 

In continuing coverage, NBCNews.com reports on a Penn study, co-authored by Daniel Weintraub, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry and Neurology, showing that doctors may be missing depression in early stage Parkinson’s patients. The study was also covered by the BBC, the Washington Post and WHYY Radio.

 

Cory Newman, PhD, director of the Center for Cognitive Therapy, spoke with Philly.com about suicide prevention and the importance of seeking professional help.

 

New Penn Medicine research, led by Daniel Weintraub, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry and Neurology, shows that neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients compared to the general population. Dr. Weintraub also explained the connection between Parkinson's disease and depression in the Philadelphia Inquirer's blog, The Public's Health.

 

Daniel Weintraub, MD, associate professor of psychiatry, spoke with NBCNews.com about the relationship between Parkinson's Disease and depression.

 

Medical Student Edward Larkin and assistant professor of Psychiatry Irene Hurford, MD, share the story of a recent patient struggling with schizophrenia, in a New York Times op-ed. 

 

Antidepressant therapy alone appears to correlate with a risk of mania in bipolar patients, while no risk of mania was seen in patients on antidepressants along with mood stabilizers, according to new research, led by Michael Thase, MD, professor of Psychiatry.

 

J. Russell Ramsay, PhD, co-director of the Adult ADHD Treatment and Research Program, was quoted in a Huffington Post article about possible indicators of ADD.

 

Led by Daniel Weintraub, MD, a Perelman School of Medicine team found that Naltrexone may be instrumental in taming impulse-control disorders in Parkinson’s patients.

 

C. Neill Epperson, MD, director of the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness, talks about hormone therapy in a WHYY "The Pulse" segment discussing new approaches to help women cope with their menopause symptoms. 

 

In an article about Philadelphia Chef Michael Solomonov's problems with addiction, Henry Kranzler, MD, professor of Psychiatry and director of the Center for Studies of Addiction, told the Philadelphia Inquirer, "It's not uncommon for people to use drugs both during times of great tragedy and great success ... as an adaptation to stress."

 

Researchers Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, assistant professor of Sleep and Chronobiology, and David Dinges, PhD, professor and chief of the division of Sleep and Chronobiology comment on a recent Harvard Medical School and University of Colorado Boulder study finding sleep deficiency in astronauts both during space shuttle and International Space Station missions and throughout a three month preflight training interval.

 

David Mandell, MSc, director of the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, spoke with the Philadelphia Inquirer in an article about autism laws.

 

David Oslin, MD, addiction specialist in Psychiatry, was interviewed by NPR about research suggesting that brief counseling may not help with most drug problems.

 

Michael A. Grandner, PhD, an instructor of Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, spoke about the importance of keeping sleep a priority in a hercampus.com article.

 

Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry and member of the Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, weighs in on a Real Simple article looking at the debate between whether seven or eight hours of sleep a night is best. Philip Gehrman, PhD, assistant professor of Psychology in Psychiatry, discusses the same topic with NBC Nightly News.

 

Michael Grandner PhD, instructor of Psychiatry and a member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, was quoted in a Travel and Leisure magazine article examining which U.S. hotels provide a good night’s sleep. Dr. Grandner also spoke with Dance magazine in a report on how lifestyle changes, such as sleep habits, can alter a dancer’s performance on stage.

 

The Penn Medicine News blog featured an article about the Adult ADHD Program, led by Anthony Rostain, MD, MA and J. Russell Ramsay, PhD, including information about the new group program being offered to adults with ADHD to teach self-management skills.

 

The Wall Street Journal talked to David F. Dinges, PhD, professor and chief of the division of Sleep and Chronobiology, who has studied sleep deprivation, about the optimal amount of sleep. 

 

Charles O'Brien, MD, PhD, professor of Psychiatry and founding director of the Center for Studies in Addiction, was interviewed by NBCNews.com about the negative effects of mixing alcohol and energy drinks.

 

David Mandell, ScD, senior author of the study and director of the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, spoke to the Wall Street Journal about the cost of supporting a child with autism.

 

The New York Times marked the recent passing of Albert J. Stunkard, MD, former chair of Psychiatry and professor emeritus at Penn. 

 

Psychiatric News covered recent research by Yvette Sheline, MD, professor of Psychiatry, Radiology, and Neurology and director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress, showing that antidepressants have lowered levels of beta-amyloid in laboratory animals and some human volunteers.

 

Steven Arnold, MD, director of the Penn Memory Center, spoke with the Philadelphia Inquirer about a new approach to treating Alzheimer's disease that is currently being tested.

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports on this weekend’s passing of professor emeritus of Psychiatry and renowned pioneer in the research and treatment of obesity and eating disorders, Albert J. Stunkard, MD, at the age of 92. 

 

Carmen Mclean, PhD, Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry, told NBC10 that experiencing a traumatic event can skew a person’s sense of time.

 

Edna Foa, PhD, a professor of Clinical Psychology, was featured in a Philadelphia Inquirer story on the treatment method she developed known as prolonged exposure therapy and its success in treating PTSD in young, sexually abused girls.

 

The Huffington Post turned to sleep experts, including Michael A. Grandner, PhD, instructor of Psychiatry and a member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, to clear up confusion about sleep. 

 

An article from SAMHSA.gov, the web site for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, profiles the unique services and approach taken by faculty and staff at the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness (PCWBW).

 

Michael A. Grandner, PhD, instructor of Psychiatry and a member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, tells Men's Health that well-timed sleep actually boosts your effectiveness as a worker.

 

For those who are addicted, there are new strategies to beat alcoholism, Charles O'Brien, MD, professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania and founding director of the Center for Studies in Addiction, told NBCNews.com.

 

David Sarwer, PhD, professor of Psychology in Psychiatry and Surgery, comments in an article from The Hollywood Reporter about the complicating factors in the field of plastic surgery.

 

Charles O'Brien, MD, psychiatry professor and founding director of the Center for Treatment and Studies of Addiction, was recently interviewed by the PBS radio program, The People's Pharmacy, on the latest advances in addiction treatment. 

 

In continuing coverage, Neurology Today reports on research led by Yvette Sheline, MD, professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Neurology, suggesting that the commonly used antidepressant Celexa, and perhaps other drugs in its class, may temporarily lower levels of a protein that clogs the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease.

 

Too much loud noise is bad for health, according to Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, assistant professor of Sleep and Chronobiology. He says “unwanted sound” can cause stress on the body. 

 

In continuing coverage, David Mandell, ScD, director of the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research at Penn, is quoted in a Philadelphia Inquirer story on his recent research showing that the average lifetime cost of supporting someone with autism in the United States is $1.4 million and for those with autism and an intellectual disability or cognitive impairment, the expense rises to $2.4 million. 

 

Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, assistant professor of Sleep and Chronobiology, was quoted in an Associated Press report addressing the impact fatigue has on air traffic controllers.

 

Jacqueline Hudak, MEd, PhD, clinical director of the Center for Couples and Adult Families, was quoted in a story in MetroKids on how differences in parenting styles can affect friendships.

 

Costs for a lifetime of support for each individual with autism spectrum disorder may reach $2.4 million, according to a new study from researchers, including David Mandell, ScD, director of the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research. This research was covered by the Associated Press, USA Today, the Huffington Post, HealthDay News, Bloomberg News, Reuters, Time, Kaiser Health News, LiveScience, Newsworks/WHYY radio and Healthline.com.

 

David F. Dinges, PhD, chief of the division of Sleep and Chronobiology, was a guest on NPR’s Diane Rehm Show to discuss sleep and impaired driving. 

 

David Sarwer, PhD, director of the Albert J. Stunkard Weight Management Program, comments in Men's Health about weight loss tips.

 

In continuing coverage, FOX News and WHYY reported on a new Penn Medicine study, led by Michael Perlis, PhD, associate professor, department of Psychiatry and director, Penn Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program, that found people are more likely to commit suicide after midnight, and the suicide rate peaks between 2 a.m. and 3 a.m.

 

Kyle Kampman, MD, professor of Psychiatry, was interviewed in a Philadelphia Inquirer article about the connection between the growth of opioid use and heroin use.

 

In a Delaware News Journal article, Charles O'Brien, MD, director of the Center for Studies in Addiction, discussed Naloxone, also known by its brand name of Narcan, a drug injected or sprayed into the nose that can reverse an opiate overdose by stopping the depression of the respiratory system, allowing a person to breathe normally.

 

Five experts weigh in on approved weight loss methods for Men's Health, including David Sarwer, PhD, director of the Albert J. Stunkard Weight Management Program, who discussed ways to eliminate mindless munching.

 

In a NOVA Next article on the evolutionary value of "ornaments" such as wild plumage on male birds, David Sarwer, PhD, professor of Psychology in Psychiatry and Surgery, comments on human parallels and how our physical appearance impacts our daily lives.

 

WHYY Newsworks reports, researchers at Penn and CHOP, led by Theodore D. Satterthwaite, MD, MA, assistant professor in Psychiatry, have found that the amount of blood flow to the brain changes in adolescence -- but in different ways for girls and boys. This was also covered by the Daily Mail, Science 2.0,  and the German publication, Der Spiegel.

 

TIME reports on a new study from Penn Medicine researchers, led by Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in the department of Psychiatry, and Jilesh Chheda, research assistant, division of Mood and Anxiety Disorders, department of Psychiatry, that found history of marijuana usage, even among quitters, may disrupt a good night's rest.  PsychCenteral.com, WebMD, Philadelphia Magazine, Medscape and the UK Daily Mail also reported on the research.

 

CBS affiliates across the country are reporting on a new study by Penn Medicine researchers, including Michael Perlis, PhD, associate professor, department of Psychiatry and director, Penn Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program, which found that suicides are more likely to happen after midnight. The new research was presented at the SLEEP 2014 meeting in Minneapolis. Consumer Affairs, Medscape, ABC News Radio, CBSNews.com, HealthDay, PsychCentral, the Washington Post, and the UK Daily Mail also reported on the study.

 

Yvette Sheline, MD, a professor of Psychiatry, Radiology, and Neurology and director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress, has discovered that the common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram arrested the growth of amyloid beta, a peptide in the brain that clusters in plaques that are thought to trigger the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). 

 

Theodore D. Satterthwaite, MD, MA, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry, was the lead author of a new study providing evidence that cerebral blood flow (CBF) levels decreased similarly in males and females before puberty, but diverged sharply in puberty, with levels increasing in females while decreasing further in males. 

 

David Oslin, MD, professor in Geriatric Psychiatry and VA associate chief of staff for Behavioral Health, spoke with WHYY about the use of peer mentors in treatment programs.

 

Thomas Wadden, MD, professor of Psychiatry and director of the Penn Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, is quoted in the Philadelphia Inquirer about a TV-based weight loss program. 

 

David Oslin, MD, professor in Geriatric Psychiatry and VA Associate Chief of Staff for Behavioral Health, was interviewed in a USA Today article about the hundreds of thousands of seniors misusing prescription drugs and the challenge of weaning elderly patients who were put on the drugs years ago. 

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports on a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine, led by C. Neill Epperson, MD, which shows preliminary evidence that the psychostimulant drug lisdexamfetamine (LDX) can aid post-menopausal women by improving attention and concentration, organization, working memory and recall.

 

Preliminary research led by Yvette Sheline, MD, professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Neurology, suggests that the commonly used antidepressant Celexa, and perhaps other drugs in its class, may temporarily lower levels of a protein that clogs the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. This research was covered by the Associated Press, HealthDay News, Yahoo! Health, Voice of America, BBC, The Scientist and WHYY radio.

 

Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, MSc, assistant professor of Sleep and Chronobiology, was interviewed by the BBC World Service about his research recently in The Lancet on the negative consequences of noise on overall health.

 

Edna Foa, PhD, director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety, is mentioned in the New Yorker's recent story: "Partial Recall: Can Neuroscience Help Us Rewrite our Most Traumatic Memories".

 

David Sarwer, PhD, professor of Psychology and medical director of the Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, was interviewed by 6ABC in a report about a new type of rare eating disorder, called 'orthorexia nervosa,' meaning extreme or excessive preoccupation with avoiding foods perceived to be unhealthy.

 

The Daily Beast reports on research by C. Neill Epperson, MD, director of the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, which shows that the drug lisdexamfetamine (LDX)—the third-most popular ADHD medication, can aid post-menopausal women by improving attention and concentration, organization, and memory. 

 

In an article about the benefits of napping during the work day, The Huffington Post reports that David F. Dinges, PhD, chief, division of Sleep and Chronobiology, helped found the modern science of napping in the early 1980s at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

 

C. Neill Epperson, MD, director of the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, commented in a OB GYN News report discussing findings from a new study showing that women who experience stillbirth or infant death have extraordinarily high rates of depression and anxiety.

 

Business Insider referenced research led by David F. Dinges, PhD, chief, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology, which found that letting astronauts sleep for as little as fifteen minutes markedly improved their cognitive performance, even when the nap didn’t lead to an increase in alertness or the ability to pay more attention to a boring task.

 

Anthony Rostain, MD, MA, professor of Psychiatry, spoke with Medscape Medical News about research showing that an extended-release formula of metadoxine improved attention in adults with predominantly inattentive attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (PI-ADHD) after a single dose in a phase 2b study.

 

Michael E. Thase, MD, professor of Psychiatry and director of the Mood and Anxiety Center, commented in a Medscape Medical News article about a study suggesting that high school students who frequent the tanning salon may be depressed and at risk for suicidal thoughts and behavior. 

 

Anna Rose Childress, PhD, research professor of Psychiatry, talks to Metro about her work with the drug baclofen to prevent relapse in cocaine-addicted patients. 

 

A new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine, led by C. Neill Epperson, MD, director of the Penn Center for Women’s Behavioral Wellness, shows preliminary evidence that the psychostimulant drug lisdexamfetamine (LDX) can aid post-menopausal women by improving attention and concentration, organization, working memory and recall.

 

Michael Ascher, MD, a clinical associate professor of Psychiatry in Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine, is quoted in a Penn Medicine news release about research showing that people suffering from vision loss are twice as likely to suffer from depression as the general population. 

 

Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor of Psychiatry and a member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, spoke with Business Insider about the negative health consequences that can result from in adequate sleep.

 

Steven Berkowitz, MD, associate professor of clinical psychiatry and director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery, was quoted in a Pittsburgh Tribune Review article about the use of social media as part of recovery from traumatic events.

 

David Sarwer, PhD, professor of Psychology in Psychiatry and Surgery with the Center for Human Appearance, comments in the May edition of Allure magazine about confidence and insecurities regarding body image.

 

Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry, spoke with WHYY about the relationship between sleep and our overall health. 

 

A study, published in Science by Amita Sehgal, PhD, professor of Neuroscience, and Matthew Kayser, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, links sleep disruption in newborn fruit flies with courtship and mating in adult flies. Sehgal and Kayser are interviewed by The Why Files and Die Welt

 

Steven Berkowitz, MD, associate professor of Clinical Psychiatry, director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery and co-chair of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry’s Disaster and Trauma Committee, was interviewed by the Pittsburgh Post Gazette in an article discussing follow up after school tragedies occur.

 

Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, talked to the Washington Post about the best way to start adjusting your diet to eliminate foods that interfere with sleep. 

 

Neill Epperson, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology, and director of the Penn Center for Women's Behavioral Wellness, was interviewed in an NBCNews.com article about infanticide. 

 

Charles O’Brien, MD, PhD, professor of Psychiatry, who heads a committee of doctors studying whether caffeine use disorder should be categorized as a mental illness, said more research is needed in an interview airing on CBS television affiliates in New York and Philadelphia. 

 

In an interview with USA Today regarding the school stabbing in Murrysville, PA, Steven Berkowitz, MD, associate professor of Psychiatry and director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery, said, "In these kinds of situations, the psychological casualties usually outnumber the physical casualties." Coverage also appeared on CNN and in the Pittsburgh Tribune Review

 

WHYY's "Voices in the Family" speaks with Kelly C. Allison, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry and Lucy Faulconbridge, PhD, both of the Penn Center for Weight and Eating Disorders, about night eating, and the link between obesity and depression.

 

Michael A. Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, was interviewed by weather.com about sleep issues that can develop in the spring and summer. Dr. Grandner also commented in a TIME magazine report on the increased understanding and support by the medical community regarding the importance of sleep for overall health. 

 

Charles O’Brien, MD, PhD, professor of Psychiatry, spoke with the Philadelphia Inquirer and Today.com about the life-saving heroin overdose antidote, naloxone, also known by its brand name Narcan.

 

Wade Berrettini, MD, PhD, professor of Psychiatry, talked to Popular Science about the link between affinity for Adderall and susceptibility to ADHD or schizophrenia.

 

Researchers at Penn Medicine’s Center for Studies of Addiction, including Anna Rose Childress, PhD, research professor of Psychiatry, and Kimberly Young, PhD, a NIH/NIDA Post-doctoral Fellow at Penn, have now found that a commonly used neurological medication has proven successful at blocking the brain's reward system triggers.

 

Steve Arnold, MD, professor of Psychiatry and Neurology and the associate director of Penn’s Institute on Aging, spoke with the Doylestown Intelligencer about healthy aging and the importance of social interaction.

 

David Sarwer, PhD, professor of Psychology in Psychiatry and Surgery, was quoted in an Allure magazine story which notes that our definition of what is an acceptable amount of plastic surgery seems to have changed.

 

David F. Dinges, PhD, professor and chief, division of Sleep and Chronobiology, addresses the question of whether or not you should hit the snooze button on the alarm clock and if those extra few minutes help, in a Wall Street Journal article. Business Insider and Parade magazine also covered the topic.

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer’s "Healthy Kids" blog mentions Edna Foa, PhD, director of the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety, and her recent study using prolonged exposure therapy to treat teenage girls suffering from sexual abuse. 

 

Lucy Faulconbridge, PhD, director of Research at the Weight Loss and Eating Disorder clinic, studies the link between obesity and depression and commented on the study to WHYY

 

The Daily Pennsylvanian reports that Penn researchers will work with NASA to examine the biological and cognitive differences in twins while one is on Earth and one launches into space. 

 

For the last four years, two titans and respected leaders in their fields have met monthly for lunch to talk about their work, their lives, and the books they are reading. Philadelphia Inquirer reporter, Art Carey recently sat in on one of these monthly conversations with Aaron Beck, MD, professor of Psychiatry, and Martin Seligman, PhD, professor of Psychology, as they discussed the mind and how to help people lead lives that are happy.

 

HealthDay News reports on a new Penn Medicine study published in JAMA Psychiatry that may help explain why smokers have such a tough time quitting. The team, led by Caryn Lerman, PhD, director of the Brain and Behavior Change Program, discovered that nicotine withdrawal weakens brain connections associated with the ability to control cravings for cigarettes.

 

The Huffington Post reports on top tips for getting a better night's rest. One tip focuses on racing thoughts before bed. Anyone who finds his or her mind racing in bed may not have taken enough time to process the day first, said Michael A. Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry. 

 

A new Penn Medicine study in JAMA Psychiatry, led by Caryn Lerman, PhD, director of the Brain and Behavior Change Program, and colleagues, is shedding light on brain connectivity in smokers that may help explain today’s high relapse rates, reports WHYY Radio

 

A team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine, including principal investigator Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, MScDavid F. Dinges, PhD, and Ruben Gur, PhD, will take part in a first-of-its-kind investigation by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) into the molecular, physiological and psychological effects of spaceflight on the human body by comparing identical twins.

 

Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, spoke with KYW Newsradio about the significant impact that can result from the daylight savings time change. 

 

In honor of Sleep Awareness Week, the Huffington Post took a closer look at some of the amazingly complex things your body can do every night and the various stages of sleep. Philip Gehrman, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry, discussed stage two sleep or "average sleep".

 

Philly.com blog post cites research by Edna Foa, PhD, professor of clinical psychology in the department of Psychiatry, and colleagues from the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety showing that prolonged exposure (PE) therapy can be a highly effective therapy in teen girls. 

 

Steven Berkowitz, MD, director of the Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery spoke with WHYY in an article about chronic stress and adversity that starts in childhood, and changes people over time.

 

The Huffington Post ran a Penn Medicine News Blog post featuring Michael Grandner, PhD, an Instructor in Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, that focused on the importance of sleep to the Sochi Olympians.

 

Trevor Hadley, PhD of Penn’s Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research and Jay Amsterdam, MD, director of the Depression Research Unit, talked to the Daily Pennsylvanian in an article about the many ways that Penn approaches mental health issues.

 

Henry R. Kranzler, MD, professor of psychiatry and director of the Center for Studies of Addiction, spoke with Medscape Medical News about research showing treatment with the anticonvulsant topiramate may help alcohol-dependent individuals who do not want to stop drinking completely reduce their alcohol consumption.

 

To find out about the challenges of getting a successful weight-loss surgery, WHYY Newsworks sat down with David Sarwer, PhD, a professor of psychology in Surgery and Psychiatry. 

 

David Yusko, PhD, psychologist in the Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety, spoke with Fox29 in a report about OCD, a disease characterized by obsessive thoughts followed by compulsive behaviors.

Anthony Rostain, MD, MA, professor of Psychiatry, commented in an NBCNews.com article about a recent study suggesting that kids with ADHD may be able to learn better focus through a computer game that trains the brain to pay attention.

 

People receiving mental health care are up to four times more likely to be infected with HIV than the general population, according to a new Penn Medicine study published in the American Journal of Public Health led by Michael Blank, PhD, co-director of the Penn Mental Health AIDS Research Center. The study was also covered by Medical Daily, PsychCentral, WHYY, the Examiner, POZ Magazine, and dailyRx

 

Researchers at Penn Medicine, led by Henry R. Kranzler, MD, have shown that the anticonvulsant medication, topiramate, previously shown to reduce drinking in patients committed to abstinence from alcohol, can also be helpful in treating problem drinkers whose aim is to curb their alcohol consumption.

 

David F. Dinges, PhD, professor of Psychology in Psychiatry and chief, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology, was interviewed in a Scientific American report about the physiological and psychological studies performed to assess candidates for deep-space missions.

 

According to findings published in JAMA Psychiatry, Penn Medicine researchers, including Ruben Gur, PhD, director of the Brain Behavior Laboratory and professor of Neuropsychology, have developed a better way to assess and diagnose psychosis in young children.

 

Namni Goel, PhD, research associate professor of Psychology in Psychiatry, and Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry, were interviewed in a Philadelphia Inquirer report about circadian rhythms and the effect environment has on sleep.

 

Cory Newman, PhD, director of the Center for Cognitive Therapy and professor of Psychology spoke with Time.com in an article about the psychology of team events and turning individual athletes into team players.

 

Michael E. Thase, MD, professor of Psychiatry, was quoted in a Medscape Medical News article about the complex polypharmacy many individuals with bipolar disorder receive. 

 

US News & World Report’s “Eat and Run” blog interviewed Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, about small lifestyle changes to help with sleep issues. 

 

Mahendra Bhati, MD, assistant professor of Clinical Psychiatry, talks to 6ABC about Seasonal Affective Disorder and how to prevent or lessen the blues.

 

Kyle Kampman, MD, medical director of the Treatment Research Center at the Center for the Study of Addiction, was interviewed in a Discovery News article about the dangers of heroin use and how the drug is becoming deadlier.

 

Psychology Today reports on night eating syndrome, originally described in the mid-1950s by Albert J. Stunkard, MD,professor of Psychiatry. Stunkard and his group, including Kelly C. Allison, PhD, assistant professor of Psychology in the department of Psychiatry, had recommended that the night eating syndrome be included as an eating disorder in DSM-5 and proposed an updated constellation of symptoms. 

 

Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry and member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology participated in a HuffPost Live interview about the intersection of sleep and heart health.

 

Led by John B. Jemmott, PhD, professor of Communication in Psychiatry, and Loretta Sweet Jemmott of Nursing, an HIV education project in South Africa shows success in preventing the spread of the disease. 

 

Daniel Wolf, MD, PhD, assistant professor of the Department of Psychiatry, commented to HealthDay about a study suggesting that teen brains showed more activity in a specific pleasure center of the brain compared to adults when they were rewarded during gambling games where money was at stake.

 

Reuters Health interviewed Philip Gehrman, PhD, assistant professor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, in an article discussing the effectiveness of insomnia treatment delivered through a Web-based program or videoconference.

 

Michael Grandner, PhD, instructor in Psychiatry and a member of the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, commented in a Boston Globe article that highlights the ways that lack of sleep can impact overall health.

 

David F. Dinges, PhD, professor and chief, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology, spoke with CBS 3 about the benefits of napping and ways of combatting grogginess.

 

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports on a recent study, led by Daniel D. Langleben, MD, which found that graphic labels on cigarette packs could reduce the rate of smoking.

 

The Stunkard Weight Management Program is listed among Health.com's top 15 Medical Weight Loss Centers in the United States. 

 

Anthony Rostain, MD, professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, commented in a NBC News article about the discovery of a rare genetic mutation that disrupts the production of histamine, which may help researchers unravel the mystery that surrounds Tourette syndrome. 

 

David Oslin, MD, professor in Geriatric Psychiatry and VA Associate Chief of Staff for Behavioral Health, was interviewed in a CBS3 story discussing new notice from the CDC that 38 million Americans are drinking too much alcohol. 

 

Charles O’Brien, MD, PhD, the Kenneth Appel Professor in the department of Psychiatry, was interviewed in an NBCNews.com article about a study reporting that five out of six adults say no health professional has ever brought up the issue of alcohol consumption, despite the fact that drinking too much can cause all kinds of health problems.

 

Teen girls struggling with post-traumatic stress disorder stemming from sexual abuse do well when treated with a type of therapy that asks them to repeatedly confront their traumatic memories, according to a new Penn Medicine study led by Edna Foa, PhD, professor of clinical psychology in the department of Psychiatry. 

 

Steven Berkowitz, MD, associate professor of clinical psychiatry, commented to WHYY radio on Edna Foa, PhD's research about the use of prolonged exposure therapy for abused adolescent girls.

 

David F. Dinges, PhD, professor and chief, Division of Sleep and Chronobiology, was mentioned in a FoxNews.com article offering health tips for the holidays. 

 


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