Media Archive

TMS for the Treatment of Depression

People Magazine Talks to brainSTIM's Yvette Sheline, MD

People Magazine Talks to brainSTIM's Yvette Sheline, MDIn a new profile piece, People Magazine speaks with writer Jenny Lawson about her new memoir, where she highlights her battle with depression. In her work, Lawson shares her struggles with mental health, and how her experience with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), changed her life.

In her memoir, the author reveals to readers her lifelong struggle with treatment-resistant depression and anxiety, and how her first TMS treatments in 2018 allowed her to reclaim her life, and even manage her anxiety enough to take a family trip to Europe.

In conjunction with Lawson's story, People reached out to Yvette Sheline, MD, Director of Penn's Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress and member of brainSTIM's Faculty Steering Committee, to further explain and demystify the concept and process of TMS to its readers. 

To read Dr. Sheline's full contribution and learn more about Jenny Lawson's experience with TMS, read the full article below. 
 
As a James S. Riepe Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor of Marketing, Psychology, and Neuroscience, Dr. Platt has taken his extensive research into understanding how the human brain works, and has translated that into strategies that will help businesspeople get ahead in the workplace. When speaking with Wharton School Press, Dr. Platt details how his interdisciplinary work allows him to analyze business and leadership from a unique perspective.

"How can we use that information and the insights from these different disciplines...to address some of the biggest challenges facing business and facing society at large?" Dr. Platt questions, emphasizing the importance of bridging the gap between psychology, marketing, and neuroscience. Dr. Platt details some insights from his research that he has applied to his own work as a leader and director, and stresses the importance of those in leadership using their roles to connect with those they manage and create efficient and effective environments with high group morale. 

When pondering the possible future intersections of neuroscience and business, Dr. Platt expresses excitement for the development of "critically important" wearable brain monitoring technologies, which will allow individuals to access and understand what goes on in their heads, and channel this information into improving their own performances.

Read the Full Article Here

Learn More About the CNDS Here

 

 


 

More from brainSTIM


brainSTIM Welcomes New Affiliated Scientists

The Penn brainSTIM Center is pleased to welcome several new Affiliated Scientists to our brainSTIM family.

Our new affiliates include Russell Epstein, PhD, Emily Falk, PhD, Martha J. Farah, PhD, and Adrian Raine. Read below to find our more about our new affiliates and how their research and missions align with that of brainSTIM.

Russell Epstein, PhDRussell Epstein, PhD, is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Epstein directs the University of Pennsylvania's Epstein Lab, where he leads a team in studying both perception, memory, and the neural mechanisms underlying visual scene perception, event perception, object recognition, and spatial navigation in humans.

Learn More About the Epstein Lab Here

 

 

Emily Falk, PhDEmily Falk, PhD, is a Professor of Communication, Psychology, and Marketing at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Falk directs Penn's Communication Neuroscience Lab, and is a Distinguished Fellow of the Annenberg Public Policy Center.

Dr. Falk's research interests include behavior change, persuasion, and how ideas and behaviors spread. She is an expert in the science of behavior change, and uses psychology, neuroscience, and communication to examine what makes messages persuasive, why and how ideas spread, and what makes people effective communicators.

Learn More About the Communication Neuroscience Lab Here

 

Martha Farah, PhDMartha J. Farah, PhD, is a Walter H. Annenberg Professor of Natural Sciences and Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania, with secondary appointments in Neurology and the Graduate School of Education. Dr. Farah also directs the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience (CCN), as well as the Center for Neuroscience & Society (CNS) at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Farah is a cognitive neuroscientist with interests in the problems at the interface between neuroscience and society, which includes the effects of childhood poverty on brain development, the expanding use of neuropsychiatric medications by healthy people for brain enhancement, novel uses of brain imaging, in e.g. legal, diagnostic and educational contexts, and the many ways in which neuroscience is changing the way we think of ourselves as physical, mental, moral and spiritual being.

Learn More About the Center for Neuroscience & Society Here

 

Adrian RaineAdrian Raine, PhD, is the Richard Perry University Professor of Criminology, Psychiatry, and Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. His interdisciplinary research focuses on the etiology and prevention of antisocial, violent, and psychopathic behavior in children and adults, including biological interventions to reduce aggressive and antisocial behavior. His three neuromodulation studies to date in both community participants and prisoners have focused on modulation of prefrontal cortical activity to reduce aggression and upregulate moral decision-making.

Learn More About Dr. Raine Here

 

The Penn brainSTIM Center is pleased and honored to have these individuals as affiliates, and looks forward to working with them in the future.


Neuromodec Highlights the Use of Wearables During Parkinson's Disease Awareness Month

Neuromodec Partners with NeuroTech Network to Highlight the Expansion of Options for People with Parkinson's Disease

For Parkinson's Disease Awareness Month, Neuromodec partnered with NeuroTech Network in April to highlight the expansion of Neurotech options for those with Parkinson's Disease.

Neuromodec, founded by brainSTIM External Advisory Board member Marom Bikson, PhD, sought to highlight the use of deep brain stimulation in treating symptoms of Parkinson's Disease. Deep brain stimulation, which is a medical device therapy requiring surgery to implant a neurostimulator in the upper chest, can lead to improvements in social, occupational, and psychosocial function.

Over the years, several other device-based therapies have been developed to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease, including focused ultrasound treatment (FUS), which allow for those with Parkinson's Disease to explore alternative therapies. Wearable neuromodulation technologies have also been emerging as a viable option in treating tremors. One device, under development from Encora Technologies, even uses artificial intelligence to sense real-time tremor severity and deliver an adaptable stimulus accordingly to control stiffness or tremors.

As research and development of more NeuroTech and wearable devices continue, people with Parkinson's Disease will be able to have an improved quality of life and will be able to have increased options for which device or therapy is most suited for their social, occupational, and functional needs.


Read the Full Article Here


Learn More About Neuromodec


Michael Platt Investigates Primate Behaviors Related to Natural Disasters

How do natural disasters shape the behavior and social networks of rhesus macaques? 

In a new profile piece from PennToday, brainSTIM Faculty Steering Committee member Michael Platt, PhD, and his team of researchers are highlighted regarding their work in studying a colony of rhesus macaques on Cayo Santiago in Puerto Rico.

The study, which had been in progress for a decade, was brought in a new direction by the effects of Hurricane Maria. The hurricane, which hit Cayo Santiago in 2017, devastated the island and left researchers on the ground scrambling to rebuild the study. However, they received the unique opportunity to study the change in social patterns amongst the rhesus macaques colony in response to the natural disaster.

The researchers were interested in seeing how the monkeys' social patterns would shift in response to the hurricane. Instead of becoming more aggressive or territorial regarding the depletion of resources on the island and the increased competition for food, the monkeys instead became more social and more accepting of one another, and built new relationships. In response to the natural disaster, the monkeys expanded their social networks and relied on community, rather than isolating themselves or their existing social circles.

To learn more about the rhesus macaques' change in social patterns following the hurricane, and to learn about how the researchers had to change their traditional methods of sampling and observation following Hurricane Maria, click the link below. 

Read the Full Article Here


TMS for the Treatment of Depression: People Magazine Talks to brainSTIM's Yvette Sheline, MD

People Magazine Talks to brainSTIM's Yvette Sheline, MDIn a new profile piece, People Magazine speaks with writer Jenny Lawson about her new memoir, where she highlights her battle with depression. In her work, Lawson shares her struggles with mental health, and how her experience with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), changed her life.

In her memoir, the author reveals to readers her lifelong struggle with treatment-resistant depression and anxiety, and how her first TMS treatments in 2018 allowed her to reclaim her life, and even manage her anxiety enough to take a family trip to Europe.

In conjunction with Lawson's story, People reached out to Yvette Sheline, MD, Director of Penn's Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress and member of brainSTIM's Faculty Steering Committee, to further explain and demystify the concept and process of TMS to its readers. 

To read Dr. Sheline's full contribution and learn more about Jenny Lawson's experience with TMS, read the full article below. 
 
As a James S. Riepe Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor of Marketing, Psychology, and Neuroscience, Dr. Platt has taken his extensive research into understanding how the human brain works, and has translated that into strategies that will help businesspeople get ahead in the workplace. When speaking with Wharton School Press, Dr. Platt details how his interdisciplinary work allows him to analyze business and leadership from a unique perspective.

"How can we use that information and the insights from these different disciplines...to address some of the biggest challenges facing business and facing society at large?" Dr. Platt questions, emphasizing the importance of bridging the gap between psychology, marketing, and neuroscience. Dr. Platt details some insights from his research that he has applied to his own work as a leader and director, and stresses the importance of those in leadership using their roles to connect with those they manage and create efficient and effective environments with high group morale. 

When pondering the possible future intersections of neuroscience and business, Dr. Platt expresses excitement for the development of "critically important" wearable brain monitoring technologies, which will allow individuals to access and understand what goes on in their heads, and channel this information into improving their own performances.

Read the Full Article Here

Learn More About the CNDS Here


'Perspective Taking' and the Secret to Problem Solving

Wharton School PressMichael Platt, PhD, Examines Decision Making Techniques

In a recent article, Wharton School Press examines how communication, collaboration, and innovation between parties can be improved both inside and outside of business contexts through the method of 'perspective taking'. This method, where an individual seeks to put oneself in another's shoes, can be used in a variety of settings to improve relations between coworkers and between companies as a whole, and help to drive business outcomes. To examine this concept, Wharton School Press spoke to Wharton Neuroscience Initiative Director Michael Platt, PhD.

Dr. Platt, who is also a noted member of brainSTIM Faculty Steering Committee, presented a study conducted by PlattLabs which examines how the human brain works differently when considering an issue from another perspective. When considering a problem by oneself, an individual activates a completely different network of the brain than when another person's point of view is considered. In PlattLabs' examination, they have found that by activating these other networks in environments that require decision making or communications, humans find it easier to be creative, learn new jobs, experiment, innovate, and generate new ideas without as much inhibition.

To read Wharton School Press' full examination of perspective taking, follow the link below.

Read the Full Article Here


Women in STEM: Redefining Mentorship

Women in STEM: Redefining Mentorship

 

 

 

WIRED Talks to Danielle Bassett, PhD, as it Examines the Importance of Representation in STEM

In a new WIRED piece, the publication explores how representation matters to women interested in entering STEM fields. It is extremely important for those interested in STEM to find mentors in their field of study, but women often find themselves without other female mentors to look to for support and assistance. This calls into question the relationship between gender and academia.

In their examination, WIRED cites a paper published released by researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi which suggested that women in STEM should seek out men as mentors, with the reasoning that papers with male co-authors receive higher numbers of citations. The publication received a huge amount of backlash, which ultimately resulted in the paper's retraction.

WIRED spoke to brainSTIM Faculty Steering Committee member Danielle Bassett, PhD, regarding the disparity between the citation rates of publications with female authors versus those with male authors. Dr. Bassett points out that publications with male authors generally receive disproportionally higher citations rates in comparison to those written by their female counterparts because other male scientists preferentially cite them. She asserts that to use reasoning to encourage women entering STEM to seek male mentors would be a mistake.

WIRED examines the benefits for scientists who choose mentors who match their own demographics. By having support from somebody who shares a demographic or has experienced similar circumstances, young scientists can benefit both academically and emotionally, and can feel more motivated and comfortable in pursuing their studies.

To read the full article, click below. 

Read the Full Story Here


Michael Platt speaks about His New Book, "The Leader's Brain"

The Leader's BrainbrainSTIM Faculty Steering Committee member Michael Platt, PhD recently spoke with the Wharton School Press podcast about his new book, "The Leader's Brain: Enhance Your Leadership, Build Stronger Teams, Make Better Decisions, and Inspire Greater Innovation with Neuroscience", and how brain science can transform one's approach to leadership, team building, and marketing. 

As a James S. Riepe Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor of Marketing, Psychology, and Neuroscience, Dr. Platt has taken his extensive research into understanding how the human brain works, and has translated that into strategies that will help businesspeople get ahead in the workplace. When speaking with Wharton School Press, Dr. Platt details how his interdisciplinary work allows him to analyze business and leadership from a unique perspective.

"How can we use that information and the insights from these different disciplines...to address some of the biggest challenges facing business and facing society at large?" Dr. Platt questions, emphasizing the importance of bridging the gap between psychology, marketing, and neuroscience. Dr. Platt details some insights from his research that he has applied to his own work as a leader and director, and stresses the importance of those in leadership using their roles to connect with those they manage and create efficient and effective environments with high group morale. 

When pondering the possible future intersections of neuroscience and business, Dr. Platt expresses excitement for the development of "critically important" wearable brain monitoring technologies, which will allow individuals to access and understand what goes on in their heads, and channel this information into improving their own performances. 

Watch Dr. Platt's Full Interview with Wharton School Press Here

To purchase "The Leader's Brain", Click Here


Dr. Roy Hamilton named as one of Cell's '1000 Inspiring Black Scientists'

At the start of the year, brainSTIM Director Roy Hamilton MD, MS was named as one of the Cell Community of Scholars' '1000 Inspiring Black Scientists'. In the announcement, Cell emphasized the need to dispel the myth that Black scientists make up on a small percentage of those in the scientific community, and sough to highlight and amplify Black talent.

Additionally, Cell calls for an allocation of resources to further encourage young Black people to get involved with the sciences and in STEM fields, in order to continue to amplify Black voices and stop the obscuring of Black talent in scientific fields. 

To read the full article and view the full list, click the link below. 

View the Full List Here

 


Ana Maiques: El País con Tu Futuro

 

In December, Neuroelectrics CEO and brainSTIM External Advisory Board Member presented at the El País con Tu Futuro, or "The Country of Your Future" Conference, which was recently shared publicly by Neuroelectrics.

In her presentation, Maiques shared her life story, and how she was able to achieve her dream and further her career with students and watchers. She begins by outlining her dreams as a young adult to forge her way as an entrepreneur, as well as her early days at Starlab whilst investigating space and neuroscience. 

Additionally, Maiques goes into details regarding her interest into creating technologies and devices that monitor brain activity in a general sense, but can also be used to monitor brain function in patients with Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and other conditions. By monitoring brain function, individualized therapies can be created to improve patients' quality of life, or even affect brain function.

Maiques closed by reiterating why she has taken the path that she has, and emphasizes her want to make a difference and a positive impact on both patients and on those in her field. She expressed a positive outlook for the future and encouraged those watching to go after their dreams, just as she did.


To watch Maiques' full presentation, click above or the link below.

Watch Here


Dr. Roy Hamilton Presents Keynote Address at ADRD Forum

PA DEPT OF AGING

Racial Disparities and Inequalities in Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment


On November 5, the Pennsylvania Department of Aging hosted the 2020 Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Forum (ADRD), as attended virtually by both top researchers, clinicians, and stakeholders alike. Messages from Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf and Secretary of Aging Robert Torres were featured, in addition to a panel discussion between caregivers for those living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, as well as an update from the Pennsylvania ADRD Task Force. The annual forum discussed racial disparities and inequities in early detection, diagnosis, and treatment, and emphasized the need for increased partnerships and support between medical establishments and communities of color, increased diversity amongst clinicians and investigators, and the need for increased awareness regarding the disproportionate impact of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders on Latinx, African American, and Native American communities. 
 
Roy Hamilton MD, MS, served as the forum’s keynote speaker. Dr. Hamilton began by giving a review of Alzheimer’s disease and its related disorders, including the difference between them, before moving on to addressing the disproportionate burden of Alzheimer’s disease in minorities, disparities of dementia care for people of color, and the steps that can be taken to address disparities and equity in AD.
 
When looking at statistics, rates of Alzheimer’s disease are more prevalent in minorities than amongst white populations. This is contributed to by a higher set of risk factors in people of color, including social determinants of health, bias and discrimination in medicine and disparities in research, cultural beliefs, and the impact of other diseases, such as hypertension or cardiovascular diseases, which can increase the risk of AD. This is also bolstered by cultural differences regarding the stigmas surrounding aging and mental decline in communities of color, which leads to seeking out care at a later stage of AD than white communities. Additionally, due to a lack of access to education on neurodegenerative diseases, lack of access to care, healthcare discrimination leading to higher care costs, medical racism and systemic inequality amongst health care systems, minorities in the United States receive inferior care for these disorders when compared to white populations.
 
“It is critical that we partner with communities of color comprehensively to enhance awareness of Alzheimer’s disease and promote diversity in research participants”, Hamilton said, emphasizing the need to build up trust between the medical community and communities of color after continual histories of medical racism, human rights violations, and unethical practices. As an example of successful endeavors into bolstering diversity amongst clinicians and researchers, Dr. Hamilton highlighted the Penn Memory Center’s own pipeline programs dedicated to increasing the number of scholars committed to the research and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease that come from diverse backgrounds and from communities of color.
 

Upon his conclusion, Dr. Hamilton reemphasized the increased prevalence and more severe symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease amongst communities of color due to social determinants of health, racial bias and discrimination in medical care, and differences in comorbid diseases. To address these factors, Dr. Hamilton stressed a need for effective efforts to address these disparities in care, including authentic community partnerships, workforce diversity, and ongoing cultural and bias trainings.

To watch the full event, click the link below. Don't have time to watch the full forum? Dr. Hamilton's address begins at 19:00. 

Watch Here


On November 9, PMC’s Dr. Roy Hamilton presented “Stimulating conversations: Using noninvasive neuromodulation to reveal and restore the language network” at the XII International Symposium on Neuromodulation. The event, hosted virtually from Sao Paulo, Brazil by Instituto SCALA, hosted talks from TMS and neuromodulators all over the world.

In his presentation, Dr. Hamilton discussed interhemispheric interactions in nonfluent aphasia, the use of TMS for post-stroke aphasia, as well as  the use of tDCS for both post-stroke aphasia and neurodegenerative aphasias, before closing out by outlining some of the challenges and next steps for neuromodulation.

Dr. Hamilton laid out the processes of both past and current studies being conducted on the use of TMS for post-stroke aphasia, including those which showed improvements in the abilities of patients to name objects shown to them, as well as improvements in elicited speech. Additionally, he outlined studies examining the use of tDCS for primary progressive aphasia (PPA) in improving naming, spelling, and overall language performance in individuals, when compared to those receiving sham tDCS treatment.

Upon concluding his presentation, Dr. Hamilton addressed past insights achieved through past studies in neuromodulation, as well as current knowledge gaps and the next steps for improving study models, tools, and procedures in future neuromodulation studies.

Learn More about the XII Symposium Here

brainSTIM Director Dr. Roy Hamilton recently did a Q&A with the American Neurological Association, where he discusses all things brainSTIM, his work in noninvasive brain stimulation, and his relationship with the ANA.

Read Here

Dr. Roy Hamilton recently spoke about his life and work in neurology and neuromodulation in a presentation to members of the CTSA/ITMAT Internship Program. Watch the full presentation below.

Watch Here

Check out the brainSTIM Center's Grand Rounds Mini Symposium on Neuromodulation, featuring core faculty members Desmond Oathes PhD, Flavia Vitale PhD, and John Medaglia PhD.

Watch Here

How to stave off Zoom fatigue: Dr. John Medaglia talks with 1060 KYW about how to avoid video chat burnout.

Listen Here

Listen in on brainSTIM faculty member Flavia Vitale's interview with BBC World Service's Crowdscience podcast regarding novel materials for neuro-electronic interfaces.

Listen Here

On NPR's The Pulse podcast, Roy Hamilton discusses the concept of at-home brain stimulation, and whether or not it's exactly a good idea.

Listen Here

Utilizing Network Imaging to Personalizing and Optimizing Neuromodulation in Translational Cognitive Neuroscience

brainSTIM Center core faculty members Desmond Oathes and John Medaglia both spoke at the NYC Neuromodulation 2020 Online Conference on April 22nd.

Oathes and Medaglia spoke at a session chaired by Roy Hamilton entitled Utilizing Network Imaging to Personalizing and Optimizing Neuromodulation in Translational Cognitive Neuroscience, where they discussed the ever evolving understanding of how brain stimulation can target specific networks and circuits that underlie behavior. These advancements allow for the application of neuromodulation using increased precision on a specific individual level.

In Dr. Medaglia's talk, Integrating Network Anatomy and Function to Enhance Cognition with Neuromodulation, he emphasized how network anatomy varies across subjects, and can guide network function, cognition, and in turn can affect outcomes. He also discussed how person-centered network neuroscience can improve the prediction of neuromodulation outcomes and drive new neuromodulation practices. 

Following Dr. Medaglia, Dr. Oathes presented Interleaved TMS/fMRI for casual mapping of cortical-subcortical connections toward novel personalized treatment targets. In this talk, Dr. Oathes explained his lab's motivation for pursuing a study which aims to improve the accuracy and individualization of clinical treatments when using rTMS to treat depression. He went on to discuss his lab's study into TMS targeting, which would improve accuracy in brain mapping in clinical treatment, as well as their foray into the search for pathways in the prefrontal cortex that would allow for deeper noninvasive modulation for treating anxiety and depression. 

View the Full Presentation Here


Center Highlight Archive


May 2021 - Desmond Oathes, PhD

Desmond Oathes, PhDDesmond Oathes, PhD, is a licensed Clinical Psychologist (CA), and is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. He is also the Associate Director of Penn’s Center for Neuromodulation in Depression & Stress (CNDS), and is the Principal Investigator at the Oathes Lab. Dr. Oathes’ primary research interests include the study and treatment of depression, PTSD, and adult ADHD.

Having always found human minds to be fascinating, Dr. Oathes thought to become a Clinical Psychologist upon entering college. With support from his mother, Dr. Oathes began pursuing his BA in Psychology at the California State University (Hayward, CA). While taking experimental methods classes, he found a particular interest in designing experiments, and enjoyed the logic involved in designing experiments to support conclusions. After receiving his BA in Psychology from California State University, Dr. Oathes went on to acquire his MS in Psychology and PhD in Clinical Psychology from Pennsylvania State University.

While in graduate school, Dr. Oathes studied and experimented with electroencephalography (EEG), heart rate variability, pupillography, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, Dr. Oathes found a concerted interest in studying brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which was unavailable at the time at Penn State. To further study the use of fMRI, Dr. Oathes completed his postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Wisconsin. During his time there, he focused on utilizing functional imaging of generalized anxiety disorder, and combined the use of TMS with fMRI upon completing his second postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University.

Early in his research, Oathes focused on how different forms of mental illness could be distinguished from one another using imaging and other tools. His research is also influenced by his work as a clinical psychologist, where seeing many patients with the same diagnosis but with different histories and experiences inspired him to pursue individualized TMS targeting to treat patients. Dr. Oathes also aims to translate neuroimaging studies into clinically actionable strategies for patients, which is being sought through combining knowledge from nomothetic databases to understand idiographic brain signatures.

In the long term, the Oathes Lab hopes to promote the wider use of interleaved TMS/fMRI to test theories of causal brain communication. Dr. Oathes also expresses a want to deepen the understanding of how successful treatment alters brain function, and how to apply this knowledge to tailor brain stimulation treatments to specific brain areas, functional impairments, and individual patients. On a larger scale, Dr. Oathes would like to increase sophistication in applying machine learning to brain stimulation targeting and imaging analysis, as well as exploring measurement tools, behavioral approaches, as well as newer forms of TMS and new stimulation tools. Dr. Oathes would like to see Penn become a training center for noninvasive brain stimulation methods so that knowledge can be shared between the next generation of scientists and clinicians toward the implementation of these tools.

Currently, the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress (CNDS) is combining diffusion imaging with Network Control Theory from engineering to hypothesize which brain areas are especially likely to exert control over others. Dr. Oathes also has multiple collaborations in the works, including those with fellow brainSTIM faculty steering committee members Ted Satterthwaite, MD, and Danielle Bassett, PhD, which focuses on working memory, interleaved TMS/fMRI, and rTMS neuromodulation. Dr. Oathes is also collaborating with University of Pennsylvania Associate Professor of Radiology Yong Fan, PhD, to use deep learning to determine brain stimulation targets and set up real-time fMRI feedback to drive working memory related brain areas into optimal states. Additionally, he is also collaborating with the CNDS’ Yvette Sheline, MD, and Wharton Neuroscience’s Michael Platt, PhD.

Dr. Oathes expresses the want to further collaborate with fellow members of brainSTIM’s faculty steering committee, and is excited for brainSTIM’s upcoming MINS Year of Neuromodulation. He also highlights the CNDS’ upcoming speaker series ‘The Neuromodulation & Neuroimaging Relevant to Affective Disorders Speaker Series’, which will kick off May 12, 2021 at 1:30PM with the University of Minnesota’s Professor of Biomedical Engineering Alexander Opitz, PhD, who will present ‘Leveraging a better understanding of non-invasive neuromodulation for improved stimulation protocols’.

To learn more about the CNDS and the Oathes Lab, click here.

To get updates about the CNDS’ speaker series, follow Dr. Oathes on Twitter here.

To tune in to Alexander Opitz, PhD’s presentation on May 12, click here.


April 2021 - John Medaglia, PhD

The brainSTIM Center's faculty highlight shines a light on the exciting research and work our core faculty have been doing both inside and outside of their labs and practices. April 2021’s highlight features John Medaglia, PhD.

John Medaglia, PhDJohn Medaglia is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neurology at Drexel University, and is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Medaglia is the Director of Drexel University’s Cognitive Neuroengineering and Wellbeing Lab (CogNeW), as well as a Co-Primary Investigator at Penn’s Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation. Dr. Medaglia’s research interests primarily concern the use of network techniques to inform practical personalized approaches to leverage brain stimulation in experimental and clinical environments, as well as querying as to how control theory can guide noninvasive brain interventions, as well as how to use brain stimulation to improve treatments and promote quality of life for patients.

After receiving his BS in Psychology from Drexel University, Dr. Medaglia decided to pursue a graduate degree in neuroscience, which had piqued his interest as an undergrad. Having always been interested in becoming a professor, he obtained his PhD in clinical neuropsychology from Pennsylvania State University, and completed his postdoctoral training at Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute with fellow brainSTIM members Roy Hamilton, Danielle Bassett, and Sharon Thompson-Schill.

Prior to entering his graduate program, Dr. Medaglia considered a career in talk therapy, but found an interest in the brain basis of disorders. During his PhD training, he was drawn to brain network modeling as a pathway to develop neuromodulation treatments. While completing his postdoctoral training, Dr. Medaglia’s interest in neuromodulation and network control theory progressed as he and brainSTIM Director Roy Hamilton used network-guided techniques to determine how individual differences in network connectivity at a particular region in the brain could influence outcomes in study subjects.

As Director of Drexel University’s Cognitive Neuroengineering and Wellbeing Lab (CogNeW), Dr. Medaglia and his team focus on how modulation targets can be selected individually rather than based on large scale data sets. Currently, CogNeW is conducting a study in which participants perform well controlled behavioral tasks to help researchers further understand attraction functions. The laboratory is also conducting a study concerning neuroethics and how people perceive and make decisions regarding neuromodulation, and how they are evaluated by clinicians in relation to neuromodulation eligibility.

Dr. Medaglia has many long-term goals set for himself, his research, and for CogNeW. He hopes to increase collaboration between CogNeW and his peers at both Drexel and Penn, and voices an interest in working with those coming from a wide range of disciplines. He would also like to generate many interdisciplinary approaches to psychology within his own laboratory through encouraging collaboration between his team of engineers, computer scientists, and those with other core technical training, and voices an interest in taking CogNeW in a direction geared toward neuroengineering. Dr. Medaglia also emphasizes the importance of continuing to strive and be proactive in creating and sustaining a diverse and inclusive environment both in his lab, and in academia as a whole to generate novel ideas and approaches in a variety of disciplines. 

In line with his interest in working with those from a variety of research backgrounds, Dr. Medaglia voices his excitement regarding his involvement with the Penn brainSTIM Center, as well as for the current collaborations he is involved in with fellow brainSTIM faculty. He and fellow brainSTIM Faculty Steering Committee member Flavia Vitale, PhD, have been collaborating on advancing the use of MXene bioelectronics in noninvasive brain monitoring and stimulation technologies. These nanomaterials can be used to develop the next generation of electrodes in electroencephalography (EEG), transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), and other neuromodulation technologies. In addition to his work with Dr. Vitale, Dr. Medaglia is also conducting a study with brainSTIM Director Roy Hamilton, MD, MS, Faculty Steering Committee member Branch Coslett, MD, as well as Georgetown University’s Peter Turkeltaub, PhD, which centralizes data analysis to test if network measures can be used to locate bottlenecks in the brain or precisely target individual areas of the brain. This study, primarily conducted in participants suffering from aphasia due to stroke, aims to determine how the language system reorganizes after injury, and whether brain stimulation can be employed to modulate and enhance recovery.

Through his work at CogNeW and at brainSTIM, Dr. Medaglia hopes to continue to foster collaboration, inclusivity, and work to further understand basic questions in psychology and neuroscience to optimize and help to individualize neuromodulation techniques, technologies, and treatments. He voices his want to affect patient outcomes and quality of life, and seeks to continue to study and apply his research interests in the future.


February 2021 - Ted Satterthwaite, MD

Ted Satterthwaite, MD

The brainSTIM Center's faculty highlight features Ted Satterthwaite, MD, is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, and is both a practicing physician at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Lifespan Informatics & Neuroimaging Center (LINC). Dr. Satterthwaite’s research interests revolve around using multimodal neuroimaging and software to study both normal and abnormal patterns of brain development. Specifically, he uses large-scale studies of the developing brain to understand heterogeneity within current clinical diagnostic categories. 

After receiving his BA from Williams College, Dr. Satterthwaite completed his medical and graduate training at Washington University in St. Louis. Originally, Dr. Satterthwaite wanted to become a neurologist, but ultimately pursued psychiatry upon realizing his interests focused on the aspects of the brain that were more behavioral. He went on to complete his psychiatric residency and a neuropsychiatric fellowship at Penn.

Though Dr. Satterthwaite focuses more on his research work in brain development, and specifically that of executive dysfunction or problems related to heterogeneity, he finds that his clinical work influences his research in many ways. Upon seeing his patients, Dr. Satterthwaite would often find that many would come in with a mix of symptoms that did not cleanly map onto the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), or that could be associated with more than one diagnoses. These occurrences informed Dr. Satterthwaite’s interests in understanding how methods like non-invasive neuroimaging might help improve specificity and also parse heterogeneity within standard clinical diagnoses. However, such research requires very large datasets, which has led him to focus on “neuroinformatics” – the process of aggregating, curating, processing, and analyzing diverse, large-scale neuroimaging datasets.

 At the Lifespan Informatics & Neuroimaging Center (LINC), Dr. Satterthwaite primarily employs noninvasive MRI based imaging modalities in his research, including T1 weighted imaging of brain structure, functional MRI, diffusion imaging of white matter, and arterial spin-labeled imaging of cerebral profusion. Currently, these technologies are employed in creating large scale data sets to identify complex patterns in brain development, and use this to inform and individualize prognoses and clinical treatments.

 

Dr. Satterthwaite and his team at LINC are currently participating in a wide variety of studies, and constantly work to create generalizable and reproducible software that can be widely used by the international research community. Two examples of these efforts include the eXtensible Connectivity Pipelines (for fMRI) and QSIPrep (for diffusion imaging) which have each been downloaded by thousands of researchers from around the world.

 

In one current study, called the “Reproducible Brain Charts” initiative, Dr. Satterthwaite’s team, together with Child Mind Institute’s Michael Milham, MD, PhD, are working to create a large-scale public data resource to study the developing brain. As part of this initiative, the collaborative group will release fully processed and carefully curated data from many diverse studies involving over 10,000 participants with ages ranging from 5-23 years old.

Dr. Satterthwaite’s collaborations also extend within the brainSTIM community. In one study, he and fellow brainSTIM Faculty Steering Committee member Danielle Bassett, PhD, are currently researching executive development in children.  Furthermore, Dr. Satterthwaite and Dr. Bassett are also working on a study led by brainSTIM Faculty Steering Committee Member Desmond Oathes, PhD, which seeks to use neuroimaging to enhance and improve targeting techniques in TMS.  Dr. Satterthwaite expresses optimism regarding these current collaborations and hopes to further foster collaboration across faculty members and disciplines in brainSTIM’s future.

 

Learn More About Penn LINC Here

 

December 2020 - Yvette Sheline, MD

Yvette Sheline, MD

The brainSTIM Center's monthly faculty highlight shines a spotlight on Yvette Sheline MD, MS, a McLure Professor of Psychiatry, Radiology and Neurology and the Director of the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress (CNDS), has spent thirty years in the field of neurology and neurophysiology.

Dr. Sheline’s research interests revolve around using neuroimaging techniques to determine how depression affects the brain and to understand how stress produces functional dysregulation. She also investigates the treatment effects of antidepressants and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) on patients with depression, anxiety, and PTSD, and seeks to understand the brain mechanisms of treatment effects and plasticity across disorders.

After receiving her BA in Biology from Harvard University, Dr. Sheline obtained her MS in Neurophysiology from Yale University, before going on to attend medical school at Boston University. At the end of her psychiatry residency, Dr. Sheline worked in emergency psychiatry and public mental health, before returning to her interest in clinical neuroscience upon joining the faculty at Washington University Medical School. She joined a lab conducting neuroimaging analysis and began to conduct research on structural brain differences in depression. Specifically, Dr. Sheline examined hippocampal volume in depressed individuals compared to controls, how hippocampal volume loss progressed in relation to continued untreated depression, and how antidepressant treatment protected against hippocampal volume loss in depressed patients. This work would help bring about the acceptance of depression and disorders like it as brain illnesses, instead of functional illnesses.  Additionally, her work examined other associated features of depression, including vascular risk factors and neuropsychological profiles.

With her recruitment to the University of Pennsylvania as the Director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress (CNDS), Dr. Sheline wanted to focus on improving treatments for depression and related conditions by working to better understand how existing treatments work in the brain. Dr. Sheline has used neuroimaging as a means to further this mission, examining brain changes resulting from neuromodulation with antidepressants, cognitive behavioral therapy and TMS.

At the Center for Neuromodulation in Depression and Stress (CNDS), researchers are currently working to augment cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with computer exercises to produce changes in cognitive control networks, seen in task-evoked fMRI brain activity and resting state fMRI connectivity in order to examine the relationship to treatment responses. Additionally, researchers at CNDS are examining the use of real time fMRI feedback in reducing depression, as well as in examining and monitoring symptoms and defining biotypes across individuals.

When looking to the future of research efforts at CNDS and at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Sheline hopes to see more studies using individualization in TMS targeting to improve treatment outcomes and with collaborators, more studies probing TMS mechanisms. By improving targeting techniques, neuromodulators would then be able to create more individualized and effective treatments for patients, and in turn elevate patients care and quality of life.

Dr. Sheline also has a positive view of the opportunities for researching TMS techniques and treatments as a part of the brainSTIM Center. She endorses the potential for collaboration amongst faculty members who work across a variety of disorders, which could allow for a further understanding of the commonalities of TMS properties for people suffering from disorders relating to stroke, for example as well as individuals suffering from PTSD, depression, and anxiety.

Learn More About the CNDS Here


October 2020 - Branch Coslett, MD

Branch Coslett, MDEvery month, the brainSTIM Center shines a light on the exciting research and work our core faculty have been doing both inside and outside of their labs and practices. This month’s highlight features H. Branch Coslett MD, a William N. Kelley Professor of Neurology at the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Pennsylvania, Research Neurologist at the Moss Rehabilitation Hospital, and Co-Director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Laboratory for Cognition and Neural Stimulation (LCNS).

Having spent forty years in the field of neurology, Dr. Coslett’s research interests include behavioral and cognitive neurology, as well as understanding the bases for human cognition through the study of human spatial cognition, functional imaging, and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

After receiving his MD from the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Coslett completed his residency in 1981 at the University of Virginia. Upon meeting his mentor, Ken Heilman, Dr. Coslett became interested in cognitive behavioral neurology and completed his fellowship at the University of Florida in 1983. His first experience with TMS came in an effort to address the question of the role of the right hemisphere in reading. Specifically, he examined the right hemisphere’s role in the reading of a patient with pure alexia, a condition in which patients can see individual letters, but not full words. Coslett and his fellow contributors used a first generation TMS coil to disrupt reading in patients, and found that the application of TMS to the right hemisphere disrupted patient's reading, whereas reading was not disrupted by TMS when applied to the left hemisphere.

Coslett employs TMS as an experimental approach in neurology, and emphasizes its usefulness when used in conjunction with traditional methods in cognitive neuroscience investigations. He cites TMS and tDCS as promising approaches when paired with therapies, especially in patients with brain lesions. Currently, the LCNS is conducting a five-year NIH-funded study of TMS in conjunction with speech therapy to treat chronic aphasia in approved patients with six or more months of aphasia due to stroke. Groups in the study all receive speech therapy, but are separated into cohorts which, in addition to therapy, receive either real or sham (i.e. placebo) TMS treatment. Language performance is assessed before and six months after treatment in order to assess the efficacy of stimulation.

Dr. Coslett hopes to use the results of this study to improve the care of aphasia, a debilitating chronic condition. Upon looking back on his years in the field, Coslett emphasizes how far treatment methods have come. When he initially became interested in behavioral neurology, the field was largely a diagnostic endeavor, with very little in the way of applied treatment options. However, many areas of neurology have seen huge advancements. For example, there are now effective treatments for a range of autoimmune and immune-mediated conditions, where before there was limited understanding of the conditions. Furthermore, the use of CT scans and MRIs, as well as other imaging techniques have revolutionized the understanding of many neurologic conditions, including stroke and neurodegenerative disorders. 

When looking to the future, Dr. Coslett emphasizes promising new developments, pointing to an emerging molecular genetics revolution. He believes that researchers will soon be able to identify, understand, and modify genetic defects or differences that are linked to neurological conditions and may modify the response to noninvasive brain stimulation. This may also allow researchers to better understand or predict patient response to treatment modalities such as TMS and tDCS.

Dr. Coslett hopes to continue to innovate and elevate the field of neurology through his work with the brainSTIM Center, and in using brain stimulation for therapeutic and scientific purposes. By continuing his search for answers to outstanding questions in cognitive neuroscience, Dr. Coslett aims to create individualized and effective treatment approaches for patients with a variety of conditions. In collaboration with other investigators at the brainSTIM Center, Coslett hopes to advance the use of novel treatments to research, repair, and enhance human brain function.

Learn More About the LCNS Here


August/September 2020 - Mario Cristancho, PhD

Mario Cristancho MD

The brainSTIM Center is pleased to highlight the work of Dr.  Mario Cristancho MD, is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania, Director of Penn's Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Neuromodulation Program, Director of the Outpatient Psychiatry Services' Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) Treatment Program at the University of Pennsylvania and Neuromodulation Service Clinician in the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Psychiatry. Additionally, Dr. Cristancho serves as an Attending Physician at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and as a clinician at the Comprehensive Consultation Service Mood Disorders Treatment Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

Having been in practice for almost a decade, Dr. Cristancho’s area of specialization is the treatment of anxiety disorders and mood disorders, including depression, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder. Dr. Cristancho works with many tools to treat patients, including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), vague nerve stimulation (VNS), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and deep brain stimulation (DBS).

Dr. Cristancho’s work in neuromodulation draws attention to the need for individualized therapies in the care of patients with treatment-resistant mood disorders. Since Dr. Cristancho usually sees patients who have already tried more than one approach to treating their respective disorder(s),he usually uses psychotherapy in addition to medication to jumpstart response and decrease the chance of relapse. He also uses neuromodulation to get patients out of severe depressive states, in order to get them to a place where they may begin to respond to medication or more traditional treatments.

In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Cristancho has been collaborating with fellow brainSTIM core faculty members Desmond Oathes, PhD, and Yvette Sheline, PhD, to improve TMS targeting, accuracy, and depth of treatment, as well as the individualization of treatment. This both changes the way TMS is used, and allows Dr. Cristancho to apply these research findings directly to patients. Together, they have modified ECT and TMS in order target stimulation more effectively, at a faster pace, and at a deeper level, and have changed how they can stimulate in terms of frequency in relation to symptoms exhibited. Additionally, they have made these modifications whilst lessening cognitive effects from its original version.


Dr. Cristancho hopes to use research findings and subsequent trials to advance the widespread use of novel treatments, and to one day enable access to neuromodulation for every patient who needs it. He hopes that as a part of the brainSTIM community, the Center’s faculty can work together to elevate patient care, treatment, and access to these life changing treatments.

 


July 2020 - Michael Platt, PhD

Michael Plat, PhDThe brainSTIM Center would like to highlight Michael Platt, PhD, James S. Riepe Penn Integrates Knowledge University Professor of Marketing, Psychology, and Neuroscience, and Director of the Wharton Neuroscience Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Michael Platt's principal research interests primarily focus on the underlying biological mechanisms that govern decision making in social environments, and how to translate this knowledge into not only how to make oneself into a better leader and team player in professional environments, but also into treatments for those with social disorders.

Dr. Platt holds both a BA in biological anthropology from Yale and a PhD from Penn in biological anthropology. His work goes beyond traditional anthropology, and envelops neuroscience, economics, marketing, and psychology. This can particularly be seen in his work with the Wharton Neuroscience Initiative, where he translates the study of neuroscience to create groundbreaking business strategies and leadership techniques. Dr. Platt’s work is frequently featured in the media, where he has been recognized by the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, ABC, BBC, and HBO Vice.

Dr. Platt has multiple new and exciting projects going on at his laboratories, two different technologies that were spotlighted in particular. In one project, Platt’s lab is developing high fidelity, high quality, reliable, and comfortable EEG devices that can be used to enhance patient care, whilst achieving more accurate readings. These EEGs can also be used to optimize not only work in office settings, but can optimize performance in decision making on the part of coaches in sports. His lab is also putting efforts into work with optogenetics in human and non-human primates to confront neurobiological problems. By using microLED systems developed in collaboration with fellow brainSTIM Core Faculty member Dr. Flavia Vitale, Dr. Platt and his researchers have found the possibility of illuminating different parts of the brain noninvasively and wirelessly, in order to stop seizures in epilepsy or shuts off schizophrenic episodes by modulating activity in different areas of the human brain.

Dr. Platt’s work with nonhuman primates has also shed light on how the human brain is effected by both genetic and environmental factors that influence both their place in their respective environments, but also social behaviors and disorders. Since the brains of humans and monkeys are so similar, researchers have studied monkeys found to have similar genetic makeups that, like humans, predispose them to specific disorders such as social anxiety or autism. There is a considerable amount of symptom overlap between monkeys and humans when it comes to behavioral or social disorders, which allows researchers to study and better understand the biological origin of these disorders in humans. Dr. Platt heavily focuses on the social structures of monkeys in their environments, and how this can be translated to the human condition. After the destruction caused by Hurricane Maria to Cayo Santiago Island in Puerto Rico, where researchers had been studied the behaviors of monkeys for 80 years already, the responses of monkeys to environmental variables, like a lack of food, shade, and water, differed greatly depending on the social environments they existed in. Researchers saw that in response to stressful events like a hurricane, monkeys were drawn to creating more social connections and alliances to support one another. The monkeys who were more isolated or lacked a strong social structure, did not react as well to destruction wrought by the hurricane.

These responses are telling in the human world as well. On a personal level, these findings could indicate that people react and handle traumatic events more effectively and in a healthier manner if they have a good social support structure around them. In a professional environment, these findings might indicate that employees might be better able to handle stress if their company emphasized teamwork and fostered a sense of belonging at an establishment, employees would be more resilient when faced with challenging or stressful situations, and would lean on one another for support, instead of taking that stress and negativity home with them.

Through studying the social and psychological behaviors of monkeys, Dr. Platt and his lab translate this into the human world, in both a social and professional sense. These ideas are merged in Dr. Platt’s work as Director of the Wharton Neuroscience Initiative, which exists at the intersection of neuroscience and business. The Initiative emphasizes the deeper neurological factors that can be tapped into to create better working environments, recruitment strategies, brand management, and market targeting. The program, which recently received an anonymous $10 million donation, seeks to use this generous gift to expand their work in this field, extend further research opportunities to faculty, MBA and graduate students, in addition to creating summer programs, and deepening partnerships with various schools and programs across the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Platt’s work across the University (and the world!), has allowed him to study and work in many fields that are of interest to the brainSTIM Center. In addition to his work in neurobiology, psychology, and marketing, Dr. Platt has a concerted interest in using stimulation to study brain activity and function, and in turn using this to treat human behavioral disorders and enhance human brain function. Beyond this, he and his researcher team seeks to use brain stimulation to further delve into how the stimulation itself alters brain function and activity. His work only fosters further collaboration throughout the Center, and enriches the field of neuromodulation as a whole. We are excited to have the chance to have Dr. Platt as a core member of the Penn brainSTIM faculty, and cannot wait to see what he does in the future.

Learn More About PlattLabs

Learn More About The Wharton Neuroscience Initiative


June 2020 - Flavia Vitale, PhD

Flavia VitaleThe brainSTIM Center highlights the work of faculty member Flavia Vitale PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurology and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pennsylvania, and director of Penn’s Vitale Lab. Her principal research interests revolve around using and developing flexible bioelectronic and nanostructured materials and devices for high resolution, minimally invasive recording and stimulation of neurological and neuromuscular activity.

A native of Rome, Italy, Dr. Vitale earned her B.S. and M.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the Università Campus Biomedico di Roma in 2008. In 2012, she received her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the Università di Roma. She then worked on high-performance biomateirals and bioelectronic interfaces based on carbon nanomaterials whilst completing her postdoctoral training at Rice University. This was followed by neuroengineering research training in the Penn Center for Neuroengineering and Therapeutics.

Some of the most exciting innovations emerging from the Vitale lab involve the use of Ti3C2 MXene for bioelectronics. First discovered in 2011, MXenes are a family of atomically thin, two-dimensional compounds that have shown great promise for use in electrochemical and electronic devices. Ti3C2 MXene possesses a number of remarkable properties that make it superior to materials that are currently used to monitor and modulate brain activity. Researchers in Dr. Vitale’s lab have used Ti3C2 MXene to create implantable microelectrode arrays. These flexible, highly conductive, nonmetallic/nonmagnetic, tiny arrays can be used intracranially to collect high-fidelity data and are much more biocompatible than conventional, inflexible materials. More information about the fabrication of Ti3C2 MXene microelectrode arrays can be found below. To listen to Dr. Vitale's interview with the BBC World Service's Crowdscience podcast regarding novel materials for neuroelectronic interfaces, follow the link provided.

Dr. Vitale’s work is of considerable interest to the neuromodulation community at Penn and beyond, especially since she is also developing noninvasive applications for these remarkable nanomaterials. Currently working with fellow brainSTIM faculty member John Medaglia, Dr. Vitale is exploring whether Ti3C2 MXene can be used to develop the next generation of electrodes for use in surface electroencephalography (EEG). By creating better tools for monitoring brain activity, clinicians and neuroscientists can better understand the physiologic effects of neuromodulation. Moreover, the development of superior electrodes may be promising for investigators who employ transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) and related neuromodulation technologies that use deliver brain stimulation via electrodes. 

When asked about the ‘big picture’ goals of her research, Dr. Vitale stresses that her mission to translate the results and findings of her work into the development and use of technologies and devices that will directly translate into the advancement of patient care and outcomes. We’re extremely excited to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Vitale as a core faculty member of the Penn brainSTIM Center.

Learn More About Ti3C2 MXene Microelectrode Arrays

Listen to Dr. Vitale's Crowdscience Interview Here