Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Titchenell Lab

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Welcome to the Titchenell Lab!

Recent Article

The role of skeletal muscle Akt in the regulation of muscle mass and glucose homeostasis

 

About Titchenell Lab

Our laboratory is located within the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism and affiliated with the Department of Physiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

The Titchenell lab is focused on the regulation of metabolism by hormones and nutrients, with a particular emphasis on the anabolic hormone insulin. Alterations in insulin signaling and action underlie metabolic disease and lead to the development of deadly vascular and neuronal complications. Over the last several years, our main focus has been on understanding the signaling mechanisms by which insulin regulates systemic glucose and lipid metabolism. Through the use of various techniques encompassing molecular biology, biochemistry, metabolomics, transcriptional techniques and whole-animal physiology, we have unraveled several new molecular mechanisms that define how insulin controls liver, adipose, and skeletal muscle metabolism. Therefore, the long-term goals of our research program are to continue to explore and validate these pathways to define their contribution to organismal metabolism. Importantly, through the understanding of the basic mechanisms of hormone and nutrient signaling, we aim to identify the underlying mechanisms driving metabolic deregulation in disease with the goal of identifying new therapies to improve metabolic control.

Recruiting

We are always looking for qualified and enthusiastic applicants interested in joining our team. In particular, individuals seeking opportunities at the postdoctoral level are encouraged to apply.

Penn BGS students are welcome for rotations. Dr. Titchenell is a member of the Cell and Molecular Biology and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics graduate groups.