Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Center for Resuscitation Science

Vinay M. Nadkarni

Vinay M. Nadkarni, M.D., M.S.

faculty photo
Associate Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Department: Anesthesiology and Critical Care

Contact information
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine
Suite 8566, Office 8572, 8th Floor Main
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Office: 215-590-7430
Fax: 215-590-4327
Education:
B.A. (Zoology)
Duke University, 1979.
M.S. (Physiology)
Georgetown University, 1980.
M.D.
University of Maryland School of Medicine, 1984.
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Description of Research Expertise

Vinay Nadkarni MD is an Associate Professor of Anesthesia and Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the director of the pediatric critical care medicine fellowship training program at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. He works in a 45-bed tertiary PICU that admits approximately 2700 patients per year. He shares responsibility for patient care and teaching with 15 board certified pediatric intensive care physicians and 15 pediatric critical care fellows. Dr. Nadkarni completed a Masters degree in Physiology at Georgetown University, and his M.D. at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. He completed his pediatric residency, chief residency and critical care fellowship at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC.

Dr Nadkarni has a local, regional, national and international interest in CPR, pediatric resuscitation, and resuscitation education. He has lectured nationally and internationally on resuscitation issues and training. He has been an invited visiting professor and lecturer at numerous academic centers including Adelaide, Beijing, Boston, Budapest, Buffalo, Christchurch, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Dallas, Melbourne, Philadelphia, Sao Paolo, Stavanger, Tokyo, Toronto, Venice and Washington DC. He has served as chairman of the American Heart Association (AHA) National Committee on Pediatric Resuscitation, and the AHA Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee, a national editor for the Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) training materials, and is currently a member of the AHA Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. He serves as a member of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) that has recently developed and published advisory statements on resuscitation guidelines for newborns, infants and children in Europe, North America, South America, Southern Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. He is a founding member of the Science Advisory Board of the AHA National Registry of CPR. He has co-chaired international consensus conferences to review and develop a strategy for international registries of CPR events. He was the Co-chair of the 2005 International Consensus Conference on Emergency Cardiovascular Care and Resuscitation Science, and helped to organize the AHA Resuscitation Science Symposia 2003-2006. He serves as President, Board of Directors, AHA Pennsylvania-Delaware Affiliate, and the national Chairman of the AHA’s International Committee. He is a board member of the Citizen CPR Foundation and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. He is a Fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the AHA. He also serves on the AHA National Spokesperson Panel.

Dr. Nadkarni balances his clinical and administrative time with investigations of CPR and critical care medicine in the laboratory and clinical outcomes settings. He is an investigator on three NIH research grants. He is a leader in simulation education development on the University of Pennsylvania campus, and has served as an educational consultant to develop infant and child high fidelity simulators. As a member of the Society for Critical Care Medicine for more than 10 years, he has delivered more than 50 presentations at the annual SCCM Education and Scientific Symposia, and received three major SCCM research awards: the 1990 National In-Training Award, the 1999 National Neuroscience Specialty Award, and the 2003 National Pediatric Specialty Award. He is the course director for the 2006 National SCCM Pediatric Critical Care Concepts Course. He has authored more than 60 peer-reviewed manuscripts and 25 book chapters related to the practice of pediatric critical care medicine.

Dr. Nadkarni believes that a healthy academic career must be balanced by a healthy home and family life, a spirit of volunteerism, and good citizenship. He is married to Ellen Deutsch MD, a pediatric Otolaryngologist practicing in Delaware and specializing in laryngotracheal reconstruction, and has 3 children: Lauren 18, Lindsay 15 and Andrew 11. His local and regional service has included the State Abuse Intervention committee, Emergency Medical Services Committee, Child Death Review Committee, and Wilmington Homeless clinic. In addition, he is a board member for the Delaware Chapter of Operation Smile, a national non-profit, non-sectarian medical organization. Over the past 15 years, Dr. Nadkarni has volunteered time to provide pediatric critical care support services on 10 international missions with Operation Smile, including Kenya, Morocco, Philippines, Russia, China, and Colombia and Ecuador.

Selected Publications

Cheng A, Overly F, Kessler D, Nadkarni VM, Lin Y, Doan Q, Duff JP, Tofil NM, Bhanji F, Adler M, Charnovich A, Hunt EA, Brown LL; for the International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research, Education (INSPIRE) CPR Investigators: Perception of CPR Quality: Influence of CPR feedback, just-in-time CPR training and provider role. Resuscitation 87: 44-50, February 2015.

Bonafide C, Lin RJ, Zander M, Sarkis Gramah S, Paine C, Rock Whitney, Rich A, Roberts K, Fortino M, Nadkarni VM, Localio R, Keren R: Association between exposure to non-actionable physiologic monitor alarms and response time in a children’s hospital. Journal of Hospital Medicine In Press 2015.

Wright SW, Steenhoff AP, Elci O, Wolfe HA, Ralston M, Kgosiesele T, Makone I, Mazhani L, Nadkarni VM, Meaney PA: Impact of contextualized pediatric resuscitation training on pediatric healthcare providers in Botswana resuscitation. Resuscitation In Press 2015.

Kitamura T, Kiyohara K, Nitta M, Nadkarni VM, Berg RA, Iwami T: Survival following witnessed pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrests during nights and weekends. Resuscitation 85(12): 1692-1698, December 2014.

Gupta P, Jacobs JP, Pasquali SK, Hill KD, Gaynor JW, O’Brien SM, He M, Sheng S, Schexnayder SM, Berg RA, Nadkarni VM, Imamura M, Jacobs ML: Epidemiology and outcomes after in-hospital cardiac arrest after pediatric cardiac surgery. Annals of Thoracic Surgery 98(6): 2138-2144, December 2014.

Sutton RM, Friess SH, Naim MY, Lampe JW, Bratinov G, Weiland TR, Garuccio M, Nadkarni VM, Becker LB, Berg RA: Patient-centric blood pressure targeted CPR improves survival from cardiac arrest. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 190(11): 1255-1262, December 2014.

Graciano AL, Tamburro R, Thompson AE, Fiadjoe JE, Nadkarni VM, Nishisaki A. for the National Emergency Airway Registry for Children (NEAR4KIDS) and Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Network: Incidence and associated factors of difficult tracheal intubations in pediatric ICUs: A Report from National Emergency Airway Registry for Children: NEAR4KIDS. Intensive Care Medicine 40(11): 1659-1669, November 2014 Notes:

Weiss SL, Fitzgerald JC, Balamuth F, Alpern ER, Lavelle J, Chilutti M, Grudemeier R, Nadkarni VM, Thomas NJ: Delayed antimicrobial therapy increases mortality and organ dysfunction duration in pediatric sepsis. Critical Care Medicine 42(11): 2409-2417, November 2014.

Sutton RM, French B, Niles DE, Donoghue AJ, Topjian AA, Nishisaki A, Leffelman J, Wolfe HA, Berg RA, Nadkarni VM, Meaney PA: 2010 American Heart Association recommended compression depths during pediatric in-hospital resuscitations are associated with survival. Resuscitation 85(9): 1179-1184, September 2014.

Weiss SL*, Fitzgerald JC*, Faustino EV, Festa MS, Fink EL, Jouvet P, Bush JL, Kissoon N, Marshall J, Nadkarni VM, Thomas NJ: Understanding the global epidemiology of pediatric critical illness: The power, pitfalls, and practicalities of point prevalence studies. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine 15(7): 660-666, September 2014 Notes: (*Co-first authors).

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Last updated: 12/16/2014
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