Penn Comprehensive Neuroscience Center

Faculty Members
faculty photo

Douglas H. Smith, M.D.

Robert A. Groff Professor of Teaching and Research in Neurosurgery
Member , Mental Retardation Research Center, University of Pennsylvania
Member , Institute of Medicine and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania
Member , Functional Imaging Center, University of Pennsylvania
Director , Center for Brain Injury and Repair, University of Pennsylvania
Vice Chairman for Research, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Neurosurgery
Department: Neurosurgery

Contact information
Department of Neurosurgery
3320 Smith Walk
Hayden Hall 105
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316
Office: 215-573-3156
Fax: 215-573-3808
Education:
B.S. (Biology)
University of Connecticut, 1981.
M.D. (Medicine)
University of Noreste, 1986.
Post-Graduate Training
Postdoctoral Fellow in Molecular Biology and Protein Chemistry, University of Connecticut Health Center, 1986-1988.
Postdoctoral Fellow in Neuropharmacology and Trauma, University of Connecticut Health Center, 1989-1990.
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Description of Research Expertise

Douglas H. Smith, M.D. is the Director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair and Professor of Neurosurgery at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Penn's multidisciplined CBIR includes over twenty-five principal investigators and their laboratory staff collectively studying mechanisms, diagnosis and potential treatments of traumatic brain injury. Over the last 18 years, Dr. Smith has devoted his full-time efforts to neurotrauma research following completion of fellowships in both molecular biology and neurotrauma at the University of Connecticut. He has been an active member of the National Neurotrauma Society and currently serves as an officer. In addition, Dr. Smith is director of a multi-center NIH program grant on mild traumatic brain injury and he oversees an NIH training grant for brain injury research. His laboratory’s research interests include investigating the biomechanical effects of traumatic brain injury, imaging techniques to diagnose diffuse axonal injury, and the link between diffuse axonal injury and Alzheimer's disease. Dr Smith's laboratory has also engineered nervous tissue constructs that have been shown to repair spinal cord and nerve damage. These collective efforts have resulted in over 170 published reports.

To view the website for Dr. Smith’s lab, please click here

Click here to view the website for the Center for Brain Injury & Repair (CBIR).

Selected Publications

Meaney DF, Smith DH: Biomechanics of Concussion. Clinics in Sports Medicine 30(1): 19-32, Jan 2011.

Cullen DK, Xu Y, Reneer DV, Browne KD, Geddes JW, Yang S, Smith DH.: Color changing photonic crystals detect blast exposure. Neuroimage. 54(Suppl 1): S37-44, Jan 2011.

Haacke EM, Duhaime AC, Gean AD, Riedy G, Wintermark M, Mukherjee P, Brody DL, DeGraba T, Duncan TD, Elovic E, Hurley R, Latour L, Smirniotopoulos JG, Smith DH: Common Data Elements in Radiologic Imaging of Traumatic Brain Injury. J of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 32(3): 516-543, Sep 2010.

Monnerie H, Tang-Schomer MD, Iwata A, Smith DH, Kim HA, Le Roux PD.: Dendritic alterations after dynamic axonal stretch injury in vitro. Exp Neurol. 224(2): 415-23, Aug 2010.

Tang-Schomer MD, Patel AR, Baas PW, Smith DH: Mechanical Breaking of Microtubules in Axons During Dynamic Stretch Injury Underlies Delayed Elasticity, Microtubule Disassembly and Axon Degeneration. FASEB 24(5): 1401-10, May 2010.

Smith DH: Can an old head injury suddenly cause detrimental effects much later in life? Scientific American May 2010.

Armstead WM, Ganguly K, Kiessling JW, Riley J, Chen XH, Smith DH, Stein SC, Higazi AAR, Cines DB, Bdeir K, Zaitsev S, Muzykantov VR: Signaling, delivery and age as emerging issues in the benefit/risk ratio outcome of tPA for treatment of CNS ischemic disorders. J Neurochem. 113(2): 303-312, Apr 2010.

Johnson VE, Stewart W, Smith DH: Traumatic brain injury and Amyloid-beta pathology: A link to Alzheimer’s disease? Nat Rev Neurosci. 2010.

Yuen TJ, Browne KB, Iwata A, Smith, DH: Sodium Channelopathy Induced by Mild Axonal Trauma Worsens Outcome After a Repeat Injury. J Neurosci Res 87(16): 3620-5, December 2009.

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Last updated: 07/08/2014
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