Clinical Research Building - Administration Office and Labs of the Department of Physiology

Our Mission


Physiology is the study of how living systems function. Physiologists seek to describe biological processes in physical and chemical terms. Accordingly, physiologists can be trained in diverse backgrounds, which enable them to bring unique insights and technical approaches to study living systems from the sub-cellular level to the whole organism. For example, faculty in our Department have been trained in chemistry, medicine, zoology, physics, biochemistry, mathematics, biophysics, cell and developmental biology, neurobiology, and, believe it or not, physiology. Physiologists may be interested in the molecular function of individual molecules such as enzymes, membrane transporters, or molecular motors, or in how these molecules interact within a network to generate higher-level biological activities. Our Department has particular strengths in the molecular biophysics of membrane transport proteins and biological motors, as well as in the cell physiology and integrative biology of transport, motility, signaling and metabolism. We employ a wide range of experimental techniques in the fields of cell and molecular biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, genetics, genomics, and bioinformatics. It may not be an overstatement to suggest that Physiology enables insights from biophysics, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, and pharmacology to be described in an integrated manner that can be applied to human medicine. Much of clinical medicine relies on understanding molecular, cellular and organ-system physiology.

Contact Physiology


  • 700 Clinical Research Building

  • 415 Curie Boulevard

  • Philadelphia, PA 19104-6085


Driving Directions


Our Location


  • Clinical Research Building

  • Administration Office and Labs

  • Suite 700

  • 415 Curie Boulevard

  • Philadelphia, PA 19104-6085

  • Campus Map

  • Directions



The Clinical Research Building, completed in 1989 represents the Venturi model for the laboratory as a loft-type space provided with regular illumination on the perimeter, with the upper story reserved for mechanical equipment as indicated by oversized grills. The walls are covered with a decorative tile that mimics the Penn Flemish-bond brickwork but with an additional mango-colored header inserted in the slightly oversized elements. The upper story is fronted with a University seal a full story high. The package is slick and taut, a sort of modern shingle-style surface that follows the office mode of the “Decorated Shed.”

  • Richards Medical Laboratory

  • Labs

  • 3700 Hamilton Walk

  • Philadelphia, PA 19104-6085

  • Campus Map

  • Directions



The Richards Medical Research Laboratories were conceived and constructed as a workplace for teams of biomedical researchers, completed in 1962 by prominent architect and Penn faculty member Louis Kahn. Richards was Kahn's first internationally acclaimed work, hailed it as one of the most influential buildings constructed after World War II. The building was named for Dr. Alfred N. Richards, a Professor of Pharmacology in the Perelman School of Medicine and the Vice President for Medical Affairs. Among Richards' most significant accomplishments was the introduction of techniques for large-scale production of penicillin during World War II. Richards Laboratories is in the National Register's University of Pennsylvania's Historic District.