Current Members


Faculty

Walter Witschey

Walter Witschey

Assistant Professor of Radiology
 witschey@pennmedicine.upenn.edu
 215-662-2310

Dr. Witschey is an Assistant Professor of Radiology and member of the Bioengineering and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Graduate Groups at the University of Pennsylvania. He was the recipient of the 2011 NIH/NIBIB Pathway to Independence Award, 2014 McCabe Foundation Award, and 2016 W.W. Smith Foundation Award. He was a former trainee in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Penn and finished his postdoctoral training in Bioengineering at the University Medical Center in Freiburg, Germany. The research goals of his group include non-invasive imaging of myocardial ischemia progression and salvage, innovative technologies for imaging arrhythmias, and MR-guided interventions for heart disease.


Research Fellow

Neil Chatterjee

Research Fellow

Neil Chatterjee is a research track resident in diagnostic radiology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.  He completed his MD/PhD at Northwestern in 2018 with a focus on cardiovascular perfusion MRI, but these days his interests are focused below the diaphragm.  He will be doing a body imaging fellowship, but before that he will spend his PGY-5 year working on AI applications to body imaging.


Graduate Students

Sophia Swago

Sophia Swago

PhD Student

Sophie is a PhD student at the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of Bioengineering and a fellow in the HHMI-NIBIB Interfaces Program. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 2016. She is exploring a variety of research topics related to cardiovascular imaging throughout the course of her rotation in the spring semester of 2020.

Beth Thompson

Beth Thompson

MD/PhD Student

Beth Thompson is an MD student at the University of Pennsylvania. She graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering. Her research interests are in using imaging and computational fluid dynamics to better understand cardiovascular pathophysiology.