Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Sehgal Lab

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Sehgal Lab August 2017

Current Members


Faculty

Amita Sehgal, Ph.D.

Amita Sehgal, Ph.D.
John Herr Musser Professor of Neuroscience

Faculty Biography


Julie Williams, Ph.D.

Julie Williams, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor

Faculty Biography



Administration

Hunter, Jennifer

Hunter, Jennifer
Administrative Coordinator
 nhunter@pennmedicine.upenn.edu
 (215) 898-2799



Scientific

Arnold, Denice

Arnold, Denice
Undergraduate Student

Denice studies the Biological Basis of Behavior at Penn, and plans to attend medical school after she graduates. Denice's project addresses the mechanism behind the circadian rhythmicity of blood-brain barrier efflux transporters in Drosophila.


Artiushin, Greg

Artiushin, Greg
Pre-Doctoral Trainee


Barber, Annika

Barber, Annika
Post-Doctoral Fellow

Annika received her PhD in cell biology from Thomas Jefferson University in 2013 where she used patch clamp electrophysiology to investigate ion channel-drug interactions. Annika wanted to use her talent for electrophysiology in the context of circuits and behavior, and joined the Sehgal lab to investigate the physiology of clock output neurons in the pars intercerebralis (PI), which serves as a protohypothalamic region in flies. While we know a lot about the function of the molecular clock in the brain, how clock information is transmitted to other systems remains poorly understood. Annika is interested in understanding how information is communicated from the clock to downstream target neurons and tissues to affect behavior and physiology. In particular, she currently is examining the role of the PI in rhythmic feeding behavior and metabolic control.


Bedont, Joseph

Bedont, Joseph
Post-Doctoral Fellow

Perturbations of sleep and circadian rhythms occur early in many neurodegenerative disorders, and have been linked to their incidence. Joe's research focuses on probing the molecular mechanisms underlying this link, and assessing whether these pathways are sufficient to induce hallmarks of neurodegenerative pathology in aging flies.


Berlas, Shaila

Berlas, Shaila
Research Specialist

Shaila received her Bachelors degree in Biological Basis of Behavior from the University of Pennsylvania. She worked as a Research Assistant all throughout her undergraduate career, where she studied rodent models of autism as well as how prenatal and postnatal diet affects the development and function of specific CNS pathways. Currently, Shaila is assisting in research examining the effects and mechanisms of stress-induced sleep in Drosophila.

 


Bi, Jie

Bi, Jie
Visiting Student

Jie is a PhD candidate at the Central China Normal University, China. She joined the lab in December 2016. Jie is interested in host-endosymbiont interactions, and in particular, the Wolbachia impact on learning and memory, sleep behavior in Drosophila. In the Sehgal lab, she mainly focuses on the interactions between sleep and memory.


Chen, Dechun

Chen, Dechun
Lab Manager


Chouhan, Nitin

Chouhan, Nitin
Post-Doctoral Fellow

Nitin has always been fascinated by the ability of an organism to modify its behavior through experience. Understanding neurogenetic underpinnings of such behavioral modulations served as a motivation for his previous research. His research work focuses on comprehending the link between sleep and memory formation using Drosophila as a model system. Fruit flies, like many other organisms, demonstrates the daily sleep-like behavior. Nitin is interested in how sleep in flies affects memory acquisition and how can it facilitate memory consolidation. To answer these questions, he uses various learning and memory paradigms like olfactory conditioning and courtship suppression. Nitin wants to characterize molecular mechanisms and the relevant neuronal circuits that promote various effects of sleep on learning and memory in flies.


Dubowy, Christine

Dubowy, Christine
Pre-Doctoral Trainee

Christine finds the question of why we sleep one of the most compelling mysteries in science. Her research seeks to shed some light on this topic by investigating the molecular mechanisms through which short-term and long-term sleep deprivation affect behavior. After a single night of sleep deprivation, flies (like humans) rebound by sleeping longer and more deeply. To elucidate the mechanisms that drive this homeostatic regulation, Katarina Moravcevic and Christine recently completed a largescale, unbiased genetic screen to identify mutant Drosophila that do not rebound after being sleep deprived. They are currently using molecular and genetic approaches to characterize hits from this screen. Christine is also interested in the impairment of other behaviors after chronic sleep deprivation. She is working to develop a model behavior negatively affected by chronic sleep loss in flies, which can then be used to identify genes and molecules that promote resilience to sleep deprivation.


Fong, Shiyi

Fong, Shiyi
Undergraduate Student

Fong hails from sunny Singapore, and is currently pursuing majors in Biochemistry and Biology in the College at the University of Pennsylvania. Her main academic interests lie in genetics and organic chemistry, and she has deep appreciation for the highly specific and complex interactions between molecules that ultimately govern life. To this end, she is excited to be assisting Annika in answering questions on the molecular basis of behavior.


Haynes, Paula

Haynes, Paula
Post-Doctoral Fellow

Paula completed her PhD in the lab of Leslie Griffith at Brandeis University working on interactions between Drosophila sleep and memory circuitry. Her work in the Griffith lab showed that the memory-consolidation promoting DPM neurons were inhibitory and promote sleep. In the Sehgal lab, Paula is working to determine metabolic changes that occur in Drosophila and mouse brain neurons and glia following sleep vs. wake and how these changes impact both sleep need and memory.


Hsu, Cynthia

Hsu, Cynthia
Post-Doctoral Fellow

Cynthia's primary interest is in how what an animal experiences while it is awake changes its sleep drive; for the moment, she is focused primarily on changes in sensory inputs. Previously, Cynthia has done doctoral research at Duke University with Dr. Vikas Bhandawat, studying how different descending neurons effect leg kinematics.


Jacobs, Jack

Jacobs, Jack
Pre-Doctoral Trainee

Jack was born and raised in Edmonds, Washington and received his Bachelors of Science from Chapman University in Orange, California. While at Chapman, Jack worked in the lab of Dr. Christopher Kim where he studied the effects of fine-grained, arsenic-bearing particulate matter on alveolar macrophage gene expression. Jack then moved to Philadelphia to pursue a doctorate in pharmacology and joined Amita’s lab in 2016. The goal of his project is to discover the mechanism by which cannabinoids affect sleep and seizures. Outside of lab, Jack enjoys listening to history podcasts, eating ramen, and taking road trips.


King, Anna

King, Anna
Pre-Doctoral Trainee

Anna is originally from California, where she received her undergraduate degree from UC Davis. Her current research centers around understanding how genes and neural circuits influence circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles. 


Kolesnik, Anna

Kolesnik, Anna
Research Technician

Anna received her Bachelors Degree in Neuroscience and Psychology at Temple University where she was inspired to learn more about how the brain functions to direct how humans behave. While at Temple, Anna was an Undergraduate Research Assistant in Dr. Mathieu Wimmer's Lab studying the neural mechanisms underlying drug addiction as well as how future progeny are affected by paternal use of drugs. Post-graduation, Anna joined Amita's Lab in May 2017 in hopes of learning more about circadian rhythms and the homeostatic changes that occur with disrupted sleep. She continues to work on projects focusing on sleep deprivation and sleep rebound in Drosophila to help uncover genes that may promote resiliency to sleep loss. In her free time, Anna enjoys playing the violin, reading, and making art.


Lee, Yool

Lee, Yool
Research Associate

In modern society, circadian rhythm misalignments such as sleep deprivation, jet lag, shift work are thought to increase susceptibility to metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease, posing a significant threat to health worldwide. Yool’s study focuses on how circadian disruption, like chronic jet leg, impacts cellular and metabolic physiology. To this end, his current research is aimed at developing cellular and animal models to investigate molecular mechanism that connect circadian clockwork with other cellular and metabolic pathways.


Luu, Kiet

Luu, Kiet
Technician


Park, Christine

Park, Christine
Pre-Doctoral Trainee


Shakhmantsir, Iryna

Shakhmantsir, Iryna
Pre-Doctoral Trainee

Iryna studys mechanisms that set the pace of the Drosophila circadian clock. The goal of her research is to uncover novel molecular components that regulate PERIOD (PER) stability and its nuclear entry, and to investigate how post-translational modifications of PER regulate the overall periodicity of circadian rhythms.


Stein, Carly

Stein, Carly
Research Specialist

Carly earned her Bachelor's Degree in Biochemistry from Rowan University. During her time there, she worked in a pharmaceutical research lab under the direction of Dr. Gustavo Moura-Letts. Upon graduating, Carly was inspired to gain more research experience in the field of molecular biology. She joined the Sehgal lab in May 2016, interested to learn how to utilize the vast genetic toolbox of Drosophila melanogaster to study sleep and circadian rhythms. Carly continues to work on a variety of projects, focusing on metabolic changes that occur in the brain across the sleep-wake cycle.


Toda, Hirofumi

Toda, Hirofumi
Post-Doctoral Fellow

Hiro was born and grew up in Tokyo. During undergrad studies at University of Tsukuba, he was fascinated with molecular genetics. During his Master/PhD program, he studied molecular mechanisms that regulate synaptic vesicle transport in fruit flies. He then moved to Vienna to join Barry Dickson's group as a post-doc, where he studied neural circuits that control fly courtship behavior. Hiro joined Amita Sehgal’s lab in 2013. He is interested in understanding the mechanisms of how sleep is induced.


Yue, Zhifeng

Yue, Zhifeng
Technician


Zhang, Shirley

Zhang, Shirley
Post-Doctoral Fellow

Shirley has her bachelor's degree from NYU and her doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania. Her doctoral research was in developmental immunology. Her primary interest in her postdoctoral work is in understanding how peripheral rhythms can influence the brain. Her primary work centers on the rhythms of the blood-brain barrier.