Department of Psychiatry

Penn Behavioral Health

Resources for Patients and Families


Patient Care Provided On-Site at the Center for Studies of Addiction

(Options # 1 & 2)

Community-Based Patient Care and Support Services Provided in the Philadelphia Area

(Option #3)

An individual seeking treatment for substance abuse may not be eligible or interested in Patient Care Options #1 or #2 described above. While we cannot officially endorse one community-based program over another, our staff can help the person make informed decisions during the treatment planning process. We request that when Option #3 is selected, the individual first reviews the community-based programs available (see links below). Exploring the links of services and programs prior to meeting with the Center intake staff will lead to a more focused and more productive referral planning session when staff are able to meet with the person.

Links to Community-Based Treatment Programs

Information Resources for Patients, Families and the General Public

The Center for Studies of Addiction encourages its clients and family members to participate in support groups such as , , or , and . Below are some helpful links:

Other Resources about Addiction for the General Public

One of the missions of the Center for Studies of Addiction is to use research to educate health professionals and the public about the most effective forms of treatment. Below are some helpful links:

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
6001 Executive Boulevard Room 5213
Bethesda, MD 20892
301-443-1124

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304
Bethesda, MD 20892-9304
301-443-3860

National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI/SAMHSA)
P.O. Box 2345
Rockville, MD 20847-2345
1-800-729-6686

WARNING: Local cocaine may contain Fentanyl:

Download more information about fentanyl and how to reduce likelihood of fatal overdose: Click here

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 50-100 times as potent as morphine; even a tiny amount can quickly cause breathing to stop, leading to cardiac arrest (heart stopping) and death unless naloxone (Narcan) is given.


Click here for Contact Information and Directions to the Center for Studies of Addiction


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