Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology

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Sleepless Nights Haunt 1 in 4 Americans

06/15/18

Each year, about one in four Americans experience acute insomnia, but most recover without developing persistent poor sleep or chronic insomnia, according to new research led by Michael Perlis, PhD, an associate professor of Psychiatry and director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine program, and presented at SLEEP 2018, the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).

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Workplace Noise in Daytime Linked to Sleep Problems at Night

06/15/18

Being exposed to a noisy workplace all day may cause stress that carries over into the evening and reduces sleep quality, suggests a small study from Taiwan. Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Sleep and Chronobiology, is quoted.

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Insomnia and Sleep Problems Are Linked to Drinking Alcohol

06/12/18

The underlying causes of insomnia are multiple, and it may be a mix of biological, medical and psychological issues, explains Michael Perlis, PhD, director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program.

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Insomnia Common but Often Short-Lived

06/07/18

Each year, about one quarter of Americans experience acute insomnia, but most recover without developing persistent poor sleep or chronic insomnia, according to new study led by Michael Perlis, PhD, an associate professor of Psychiatry and director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine program, and presented at SLEEP 2018, the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).

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Some People Handle Sleep Deprivation Better Than Others, According To New Research

06/07/18

Some people can handle sleep deprivation better than others, according to new research led by Namni Goel, PhD, a research associate professor of Psychology in Sleep and Chronobiology — and it turns out, the ease with which you handle sleep deprivation can be traced to a component of your genetic makeup called microRNAs. This study was presented at SLEEP 2018, the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS).

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Yes, You Can Catch Up On Your Sleep! | HowStuffWorks

06/07/18

A Swedish study published in an April 2018 issue of the Journal of Sleep Research suggests catching up on sleep may be more beneficial than previously thought. “The real question is whether there is, in fact, a build-up of deficit, or biological changes that are gradual over time, even though you get recovery sleep,” said David F. Dinges, PhD, chief of Sleep and Chronobiology, who was not involved with the study.

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Can Research on Astronauts Lead to a Good Night's Sleep on Earth?

06/07/18

Scientists and NASA engineers are coming to grips with how the body's natural biorhythms are affected by artificial light, whether from a bedside lamp, the overhead fixtures of a hospital room, or the cramped quarters of a space capsule in the twilight between planets. Mathias Basner, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Sleep and Chronobiology, is quoted.

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Can You Catch Up On Sleep On the Weekends? | Time

05/25/18

A new study in the Journal of Sleep Research suggests that if you don’t get enough sleep during the week, sleeping in on the weekends may cancel out at least some of the associated health risks. David F. Dinges, PhD, chief of Sleep and Chronobiology, who was not involved in the research, is quoted.

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This Is What Happens To Your Body When It's Sleep-Deprived

05/24/18

Insufficient sleep can worsen your mood, according to a study led by David F. Dinges, PhD, chief of Sleep and Chronobiology.

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The Bizarre Phenomenon of Microsleep

05/21/18

Ilene Rosen, MD, a professor of sleep medicine, weighs in on microsleep. We've all experienced brief episodes where we've completely zoned out, losing attention and focus, or had our heads bob and our eyelids close for a moment (or two or three) ... until a sudden head jolt brought us back to reality. This is called a microsleep, an involuntary episode of unconsciousness that typically lasts from a fraction of a second up to 15 seconds.

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How Much Sleep Should You Be Getting?

05/16/18

In an interview with the Social Brain Blog, Sigrid C. Veasey, a professor of Sleep Medicine, discusses the relationship between sleep and mental health, effects of sleep deprivation, naps, and misconceptions about sleep.

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Drowsy Driving in the Ridesharing Industry Is a Public Safety Risk

05/04/18

A position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine by Ilene M. Rosen, MD, a professor of Sleep Medicine, Indira Gurubhagavatula, MD, an associate professor of Sleep Medicine, and colleagues, concludes that fatigue and sleepiness are inherent safety risks in the ridesharing industry.

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Fatigue a Major Risk in Ridesharing Industry

04/26/18

Fatigue from sleep deprivation is an important safety risk in the ridesharing industry, according to an American Academy of Sleep Medicine position statement by Ilene M. Rosen, MD, a professor of Sleep Medicine, Indira Gurubhagavatula, MD, an associate professor of Sleep Medicine, and colleagues, in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. The statement calls attention to the growing popularity of ridesharing apps and the regulatory and safety issues that haven’t yet been addressed.

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Penn Professor Highlights Why Your Rideshare Driver Could Fall Asleep at the Wheel

04/19/18

Sleep deprivation is an important safety risk in the ridesharing industry, according to an American Academy of Sleep Medicine position statement by Ilene M. Rosen, MD, a professor of Sleep Medicine, Indira Gurubhagavatula, MD, an associate professor of Sleep Medicine, and colleagues, in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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Lack of Quality Sleep can Lead to Serious Health Issues

03/29/18

Short sleep can impair mental and physical health, but how much sleep do we really need? “People, in general, would be better off with more sleep (say 7-8 hours)," said Michael Perlis, PhD, director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program. "This said, everyone’s sleep need, ability and opportunity greatly differ, and thus what is optimal for one person may differ from what is optimal for another person.”

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