Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Physics and Instrumentation Group

Current Personnel


Faculty

Joel Karp

Joel Karp
Professor
 joelkarp@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Dr. Karp is Professor of Radiologic Physics in the Department of Radiology, and in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania. He is Chief of the Physics and Instrumentation Research Group in Radiology and directs Nuclear Medicine/PET Physics and QC in the clinic, as well as the Small Animal Imaging Facility Nuclear Medicine (PET/SPECT/CT) core. He received his PhD in nuclear physics from MIT in 1980 and joined the faculty at Penn in 1983, and since then his research has focused on investigations to improve and characterize the performance of PET technology, including front-end electronics, detector design, data correction techniques, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. This work has resulted in development of fully 3D PET scanners and innovative imaging systems based on various scintillation detectors, and some of these concepts have been implemented commercially for human and animal imaging. Dr. Karp has developed systems for time-of-flight (TOF) imaging, and his work with industry led to adoption of TOF in modern PET/CT scanners. Dr. Karp is currently leading the team at Penn in the development of the large axial field-of-view PennPET Explorer instrument, which will enable new opportunities for both clinical and research investigations. 


Scott Metzler

Scott Metzler
Research Professor
 metzler@upenn.edu

Projects: SPECT system design, Small Animal Imaging, Image Reconstruction

Dr. Metzler is a Research Professor of Radiology. His research focuses on the development and characterization of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) systems and collimation as well as unique uses of PET scanners, such as the acquisition of supersampled data in PET. He also develops calibration techniques and reconstruction software for these systems.

Dr. Metzler completed his BS in physics at Pennsylvania State University and PhD in physics at University of Pennsylvania. He completed his first post-doctoral training in high-energy physics at California Institute of Technology on the BaBar experiment, which was looking for and found CP violation in B-quark mesons. Dr. Metzler then completed his second post-doctoral training in medical imaging at Duke University and joined the faculty as a research assistant professor. Dr. Metzler joined the Department of Radiology in 2004.

Dr. Metzler's instrumentation efforts are currently geared towards cardiology. He is the principal investigator of the C-SPECT project, which aims to replace traditional myocardial SPECT imaging with a stationary, upright system. An important goal of this project is to measure the flow of blood to different regions of the heart muscle and compare that result with PET, which is currently the gold standard for that measurement, but suffers from substantially higher costs and lower availability. This effort is complemented with parallel developments in small-animal imaging, where it is possible to study the molecular and genetic mechanisms that affect cardiac function. Dr. Metzler is also involved in imaging research for the assessment of Peripheral Arterial Disease with colleagues at University of Illinois and Yale University.

Scott Metzler CV


Samuel Matej

Samuel Matej
Research Associate Professor
 matej@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: Image Reconstruction, PET Image Analysis

Dr. Matej is Research Associate Professor of Radiology in the Department of Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his M.Sc. in computer science from Slovak Technical University in 1983, Ph.D. in measurement science from Slovak Academy of Sciences in 1988, and joined University of Pennsylvania in 1991. He has been active in the research field of tomographic image reconstruction methods for about 35 years, with the main focus directed towards research, development, and investigation of clinically practical fully three-dimensional PET reconstruction methods and tools supporting quantitative PET imaging. These include Fourier-based techniques and novel TOF data partitioning approaches allowing very efficient implementation of analytic and iterative fully 3D reconstruction algorithms. His overall research philosophy has been to develop approaches not only of high scientific quality and novelty, but at the same time approaches that are reliably applied to acquired PET data and that are robust and practical for routine clinical employment. Success of this philosophy has been demonstrated by successful applications of his research results in clinic within our and other institutions, and implementation of the developed reconstruction algorithms and tools on commercial PET systems which are now in routine clinical use. Dr. Matej's current research involvements include TOF reconstruction and data correction approaches for quantitative static and 4D dynamic reconstructions for conventional and long axial FOV (PennPET Explorer) whole-body scanners, as well as for specialized instruments such as dual-panel breast scanner (B-PET), developed within our team at Penn.


Suleman Surti

Suleman Surti
Research Associate Professor
 surti@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: PET System Design, PET Image Analysis, Monte-Carlo modeling

Dr Surti’s general research interest is in PET imaging, ranging from detector and system development through data corrections to image analysis and imaging protocol optimization. His current research projects involve the development of a dedicated breast PET/DBT (digital breast tomosynthesis) system, new scatter correction methods, task based image optimization for modern PET/CT systems, and new PET system design and development.

Dr Surti has been involved in work related to new detector designs with improved spatial and timing performance, design of new PET systems with long axial FOV, as well as improved spatial and timing resolution, and significant experience in analyzing improved imaging performance with TOF PET.

Dr Surti obtained his PhD in Physics at the University of Pennsylvania in 2000 followed by postdoctoral research work also at Penn through 2003.


Robert Doot

Robert Doot
Research Assistant Professor
 robdoot@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: Kinetic Modeling, PET Image Analysis

Dr. Doot is a Research Assistant Professor of Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania. He leads the Positron Emission Tomography Analyses Laboratory (PETAL) and is also Co-Director of the Nuclear Medicine PET Center Advanced Image Analysis Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania. He has coauthored five US patents including one on “Calibration method and system for PET scanners” (US patent 7858925). He received a BSE in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan and was awarded a MS in Bioengineering from the University of Washington with a thesis on “Engineering two-dimensional networks of oriented microtubules for directed cargo transport” and earned a dual PhD in Bioengineering and Nanotechnology from the University of Washington via a dissertation on “Factors affecting quantitative PET as a measure of cancer response to therapy”. He subsequently received postdoctoral training in the Imaging Research Laboratory in the Department of Radiology at the University of Washington. He joined the faculty at Penn in 2013 to pursue his passion for devising new quantitative imaging methodologies and instrumentation for novel PET radiotracers and existing PET tracers for new applications to be used for preclinical studies through translation into multicenter clinical trials. These areas of focus have been applied to study targeted cancer and infection therapy throughout the body and underlying mechanisms of addiction and neurodegeneration in the brain.



Research Staff

Bill Ashmanskas

Bill Ashmanskas
Senior Research Investigator
 ashmansk@hep.upenn.edu

Bill Ashmanskas splits his time as a Sr. Research Investigator in the Department of Radiology and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Physics. His background as a high-energy physicist and experience with electronics gained at Fermi National Accelerator Lab translated to the development of PET electronics for time-of-flight PET imaging. He is currently responsible for the development of digital electronics for the B-PET project. 

Website


Margaret Daube-Witherspoon

Margaret Daube-Witherspoon
Senior Research Investigator
 daubewit@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: Image Reconstruction, PET Image Analysis and data quantification

Dr. Daube-Witherspoon's research encompasses all aspects of quantitative PET imaging, from testing/optimizing reconstruction algorithms to corrections methodology to image analysis. She is currently focused on long axial FOV PET scanner characterization of both intrinsic performance and applications unique to these systems.

From 1983-1986, Dr. Daube-Witherspoon worked in the Department of Radiology at the University of Pennsylvania with Gerd Muehllehner. From 1986-1998, she was at the National Institutes of Health, first in the Nuclear Medicine Department and then in the Positron Emission Tomography Department.

She received her B.A. in Physics from Swarthmore College in 1978 and her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in 1983. Her Ph.D. thesis work involved developing new PET radiotracers for myocardial perfusion imaging, from accelerator target development to human biodistribution studies.


Michael Geagan

Michael Geagan
Senior System Design Engineer
 mgeagan@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: PennPET Explorer

Michael is responsible for the mechanical and system design of the PennPET Explorer total body imager. He has worked as the Director of Engineering and Advanced Development at Philips Medical Systems PET Imaging Group. Michael has a BA from the University of Pennsylvania.


Srilalan Krishnamoorthy

Srilalan Krishnamoorthy
Research Scientist

Projects: PET System Design

Dr. Krishnamoorthy has experience on several aspects related to the development of instrumentation for PET scanners and is working on the development of a high spatial resolution, time-of-flight capable PET scanner for dedicated breast imaging.

Dr. Krishnamoorthy's research before joining Penn focused on the design, development and optimization of several scintillation and semiconductor detectors for gamma-ray imaging.

He received both his Master's and Doctoral degrees (Stony Brook University) in Biomedical Engineering with a focus on Medical Imaging Physics.


Yusheng Li

Yusheng Li
Research Scientist
 yushli@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: Image Reconstruction, PET Image Analysis

Dr. Li is currently focused on developing clinically practical CT-less joint reconstruction for time-of-flight PET scanners to obtain quantitatively accurate activity and attenuation images. He is also working on 4D dynamic reconstruction and tracer kinetic modeling for quantitative PET imaging applications. Currently, his research interests include tomographic image reconstruction algorithms in PET, data processing, and data correction techniques.

He worked as a postdoctoral researcher on the development of a dedicated cardiac SPECT using slit-slit collimator, at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Rush University Medical Center. He mathematically characterized slit-slat collimator, and analyzed noise propagation for iterative image reconstruction based on Fisher information since 2007. In 2011, he joined the Physics and Instrumentation Group. Since then, he has been worked on PET instrumentation and image reconstruction. He has developed a fractional-crystal collimation for a small animal PET scanner with LOR-interleaving image reconstruction and super-sampling technique to improve PET spatial resolution. He has developed a unified Fourier theory and derived generalized consistency equations for time-of-flight PET.

Dr. Li received his BS in applied physics and PhD (first-class Hons.) in physics electronics both from University of Science and Technology of China in 2002 and 2007, respectively. His PhD thesis involved developing super-speed time-interleaved data acquisition systems with real-time postprocessing implemented in FPGA.


Mike Parma

Mike Parma
Senior Software Architect
 parma@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: PennPET Explorer

Mike Parma works on software architecture, software development, hardware support, and 510k support for the PennPET Explorer project. He has over 30 years of software development experience in the medical device industry, including both PET and CT. Mike Parma has a BS in Computer Engineering, 1985 from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH.


Amy Perkins

Amy Perkins
Technical Project Manager, Philips Healthcare

Projects: PennPET Explorer

As a Philips research physicist, Dr. Perkins works on-site at the University of Pennsylvania collaborating with the UPenn PET group to build the PennPET Explorer and investigate the benefits of long axial-field-of-view scanners.  Amy also collaborates with Dr. Peter Noel at UPenn on spectral CT imaging research.

Amy has participated in feasibility testing and the building of PET prototypes, including a LaBr3-based scanner, the A-PET animal system, and a pixelated NaI(Tl) prototype.  She has performed studies with clinical data to evaluate the clinical impact of time-of-flight imaging, as well as investigated the effect of different imaging corrections on quantitative accuracy.

Dr. Perkins received her PhD in physics from Brown University


Matt Werner

Matt Werner
Senior Software Architect
 matt.werner@uphs.upenn.edu

Projects: PennPET Explorer, Image Reconstruction, Scanner Calibration

Matt is interested in hardware calibrations, data corrections, and image reconstruction architectures related to multi-ring long axial field-of-view PET scanners.

Matt has nearly 20 years of experience in developing algorithms and software related to scanner efficiency and timing calibration, scatter correction, and 3D image reconstruction. Before that, Matt worked in the aerospace industry developing simulations, 3D visualizations, and performance analyses of missile defense and satellite surveillance systems.

Matt has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from RPI, a MS in Mechanical Engineering from Caltech and a MS in Computer Science from Penn.


Emmanuel Morales-Negron

Emmanuel Morales-Negron
Tech Instumentation

Projects: B-PET

Emmanuel has been working with the High Energy Physics Instrumentation group at the University of Pennsylvania developing a quad-channel amplifier for fast timing application. He is also working on the development of custom electronics being developed for a dedicated breast PET scanner.



Clinical Physics

Janet Reddin

Janet Reddin
Senior Research Investigator

Dr. Reddin is a Sr. Research Investigator and contributes to the support of the clinical instruments in Nuclear Medicine, including monthly, quarterly, and annual testing of existing equipment and acceptance testing of new PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners.  She also is a course director of the Nuclear Medicine physics curriculum for Radiology residents and Nuclear Radiology fellows. Since 2005 she has served as a PET Core Lab Physicist at ECOG/ACRIN, qualifying hundreds of PET/CT scanners for participation in quantitative PET research trials.  She is also Co-Director of the University’s Nuclear Medicine Advanced Image Analysis Lab (NM AIA).


Josh Scheuermann

Josh Scheuermann
Medical Physicist

Projects: PennPET Explorer, PET Image Analysis, Clinical Support for NucMed and PET Clinics

Josh is mostly involved in supporting the physics needs of the Nuclear Medicine and PET clinics, including internal dosimetry for radionuclide therapies and quality assurance for the Nuclear Medicine and PET cameras. He has gotten involved in the PennPET Explorer project to assist in moving the system into a more clinical operating environment.

Josh started working for the Physics and Instrumentation Group as a junior level physicist in 2006 right out of graduate school. For his first few years, his focus was on image analysis for the ACRIN PET Core Lab and updating and standardizing the quality control programs in the Nuclear Medicine and PET clinics at HUP, PCAM and several satellites. In 2012, Josh began cross-training in Radiation Oncology and has been working as a clinical medical physicist in both Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Oncology since.

Josh graduated from St. Joseph's University in 2004 with a BS in Physics. He then enrolled in the Master of Medical Physics program at University of Pennsylvania and graduate with an MMP degree in 2006.

While not at work, Josh enjoys carpentry, vegetable gardening, traveling to new places and getting outdoors to go backpacking, hiking and camping. He and his wife recently had a son and they are looking forward to continuing their traveling with Vance and imparting their love of the outdoors to him.


Randy Kulp

Randy Kulp
Electrical Engineer

Projects: PennPET Explorer, Small Animal Imaging, Clinical Quality Control

Randy works on retrofitting and updating legacy scanners and developing new systems. He has 30 years electrical engineering and prototyping experience. He has also worked as a Philips Medical Systems lab technician troubleshooting and calibrating new PET systems in the lab. Additionally, Randy has field experience in trouble shooting and corrective maintenance of systems, along with setting up new scanners and systems in research labs. Randy has an Electrical Engineering Associates Degree.



SAIF

Eric Blankemeyer

Eric Blankemeyer
Technical Director, SAIF Nuclear Medicine Core
 eriblank@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: Small Animal Imaging

Eric is currently, the Technical Director of the Small Animal Imaging Facility. His responsibilities include animal imaging, development of imaging protocols, and maintenance of the PET, SPECT, and CT scanners in the lab. Eric has a BS in Biological Sciences from Rutgers University



PETAL Staff

Anthony Young

Anthony Young
Research Specialist

Projects: PET Image Analysis

Anthony performs PET/CT and MRI image analysis and kinetic modeling on new and existing PET radiotracers, studying cancer, infection, addiction, and neurodegeneration. He also designed and implemented an application for measurement of 3D spinal curvature, coauthoring the patent "Systems and Methods for Modeling Spines and Treating Spines based on Spine Models" (US Patent Appl. 20190099221). He graduated from Drexel University with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering.


Tiffany Dominguez

Tiffany Dominguez
Research Specialist

Projects: PET Image Analysis

Tiffany is currently part of the Positron Emission Tomography Analyses Laboratory. She conducts PET image analyses of static and dynamic scans. Tiffany worked as a research assistant conducting Neuroeconomics and Psychology research. She has a B.S in Biological Basis of Behavior and Chemistry.



Adjunct Faculty

Steve Moore

Steve Moore
Adjunct Associate Professor
 scmoore1@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: PET and SPECT, Small Animal Imaging

Dr. Moore is currently working with Dr. Metzler and colleagues on developing and optimizing new systems and kinetic-modeling techniques for quantitative imaging of myocardial blood flow and flow reserve in various research applications. He is also working with Drs. Karp, Metzler, and other colleagues on new approaches for simultaneous dual-radionuclide PET imaging, both for preclinical PET systems and for the PennPET Explorer total-body PET scanner.

During a post-doctoral position in Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and through successive faculty positions at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Moore worked on research projects related to prospectively gated cardiac CT, as well as on task-based optimization of systems for improved nuclear medicine imaging and image-based quantitation. From 1986 to 1992, while on the faculty in Biomedical Engineering at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, he advised numerous graduate and undergraduate students on their research projects, continued his research in nuclear medicine, and gained experience in magnetic resonance imaging research. Dr. Moore then returned to the Joint Program in Nuclear Medicine at Harvard Medical School, eventually to become the Director of Nuclear Medicine Physics at Brigham and Women's Hospital, where his research was based on improving the acquisition, reconstruction, and extraction of quantitative information from emission tomographic images; in that capacity, he was principal investigator on a long-term NIH R01 grant, and he also developed a multiple-pinhole research micro-SPECT imaging system with additional support from NIH and industry.

Dr. Moore earned a B.S. in physics from Bucknell University in 1972, and a Ph.D. in experimental high-energy physics from Brandeis University in 1978. After a short period working in industry, he received additional training as a post-doctoral research associate in Radiologic Physics and Nuclear Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Moore is now semi-retired; he and his wife enjoy traveling, babysitting for their grandchildren in Philadelphia, and spending much of the summer and many weekends at their camp on a lake in the Adirondacks. During the school year, Dr. Moore has been volunteering as a tutor for underserved middle-school students in math and science in the after-school program at the North Light Community Center. He continues to pursue a long-time interest in music by attending many concerts, and by practicing on his 110-year-old Steinway piano.



Collaborators

Gerd Muehllehner

Gerd Muehllehner

Projects: PennPET Explorer

After receiving his Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics, Dr. Muehllehner worked for 12 years for Searle Radiographics (now Siemens) developing Nuclear Medicine instrumentation, specifically gamma cameras. His interest in PET was one of the reasons he decided to join a team at the University of Pennsylvania, where he developed PET scanners for more than 10 years. In 1990 his wife, whose background is in finance, and he decided to make the PET scanner, which was developed at the U of Penn, commercially available at their company, UGM Medical Systems. This scanner was marketed for 5 years through General Electric and later through ADAC. During the years at UGM Medical Systems Dr. Muehllehner was involved in a number of important developments. Starting with a NaI(Tl) based scanner with flat crystals, they pioneered the use of curved NaI(Tl) crystals in a commercial system (the C-PET scanner). Together with the U of Penn they built an animal scanner (marketed through Philips as the Mosaic), a dedicated brain scanner (now used at Penn for primate imaging) and finally a whole body PET scanner using GSO as the scintillator (the Allegro scanner). In 1999 UGM Medical Systems merged with ADAC, which itself merged with Philips Medical Systems a year later. After serving as president at UGM Medical Systems and directing the growth of the company from 3 scanners per year to 60 scanners per year, Dr. Muehllehner went back to Advanced Development during his years at ADAC and Philips Medical Systems. Since April 2005 he has been retired.

Dr. Muehllehner has been recently involved in the development of the PennPET Explorer and has formed a small company, KAGE Medical. They plan to leverage their previous experience of taking a University based instrument to the product stage as part of the work in an NIH Academic-Industry Partnership grant. His role is to help comply with FDA rules so that they may get approval for a 510(k) for the PennPET Explorer to enable Penn to perform clinical as well as research PET studies in the next year.


Wei Chang

Wei Chang

Projects: C-SPECT

Dr. Chang have 40 years of experience of nuclear-medicine instrumentation since receiving my PhD degree in Medical Nuclear Physics.  He worked as a clinical radiological physicist, and became interested in nuclear imaging applications and imaging instrumentation. Research became a major part of my job after he settled in Chicago’s Rush University Medical center, and included design and development of new imaging techniques, imaging hardware, and SPECT systems, particularly in using new system geometry with novel detector and collimator systems. In those 3 decades, his team has developed many new SPECT imaging techniques and imaging systems using new detector and collimator designs. The latest system, C-SPECT, is a high-performance dedicated clinical cardiac SPECT system, designed for optimized static and dynamic imaging. He had the privilege to partner on this project with Drs. Metzler and Karp of Penn, and, in 2016 his team moved to Penn to keep the project going forward under new leadership and superior research environment. The project has since received additional funding, to allow it to move on to preclinical and clinical imaging, while he now plays a supporting role.



Administration

Mary Blue

Mary Blue
Administrative Assistant
 maryb@pennmedicine.upenn.edu



Postdoctoral Fellows

Lindsay Johnson

Lindsay Johnson
Postdoctoral Researcher

Projects: Cardiac Small Animal Imaging, Data Quantitation

Dr. Johnson’s current work aims to improve quantification of cardiac SPECT imaging. For preclinical imaging, she has designed a novel quadrilateral-hole collimator for to increase efficiency of projection tiling on the detector face. She has also used a specially-designed cardiac phantom with multiple parts to evaluate system’s kinetic modeling accuracy and is helping to develop preclinical protocols for determining myocardial blood flow and reserve. Additionally, she is helping develop the C-SPECT project, a dedicated clinical cardiac SPECT system.

Previously at Vanderbilt University, Dr. Johnson characterized a HPGe detector, and subsequently used it to develop a HPGe-SPECT system. She developed reconstruction algorithms that utilized experimentally-acquired and analytically-derived system matrices and evaluated system performance quantitatively and qualitatively using phantoms. Additionally, she investigated the benefit of a stacked Si-HPGe SPECT system to reduce the negative effects of multiplexing while increasing system sensitivity.

Dr. Johnson obtained her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, Davis. While at Vanderbilt University, she was awarded an M.S. for her thesis on "Imaging of Osteolytic Breast Cancer Metastases with Computed Tomography, Positron Emission Tomography and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography" and a Ph.D. for her dissertation on "Development of a Small-Animal SPECT System with a High-Purity Germanium Detector".


Poopalasingam Sankar

Poopalasingam Sankar
Postdoctoral Researcher
 psank@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: C-SPECT

Dr. Sankar is interested in mechanical design and construction of emission-tomography scanners. He has worked on the C-SPECT project since graduating. He competed his PhD at University of Illinois at Chicago.


Dale Stentz

Dale Stentz
Researcher
 dstentz@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: C-SPECT

Dr. Stentz works on designing and building the Cardiac SPECT Imaging. He previously worked on the CDF experiment, a high-energy physics experiment at Fermilab. He completed hisPhD at Northwestern in physics.


Paul Gravel

Paul Gravel
Postdoctoral Researcher
 Paul.Gravel@pennmedicine.upenn.edu

Projects: Image Reconstruction, PET Image Analysis

Dr. Gravel is currently working on the implementation and evaluation of the impact of 4D time-of-flight (TOF) reconstruction approaches within the Direct Image Reconstruction for TOF data (DIRECT), including resolution modeling, spatial and temporal regularization, as well as other data correction of dynamic PET whole-body data sets.

He has previously worked as a Research Associate at McGill University and Concordia University, and as a Postdoctoral Associate at Yale University in the field of PET with applications in Parkinson's Disease, pain, and addiction.

Dr. Gravel has a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering where his thesis focused on the "Direct Reconstruction of Binding Potential for Positron Emission Tomography", and an M.Sc. in Neurosciences where his thesis work focused on "Positron Emission Tomography of Extra-Striatal Dopamine Release" using [18F]Fallypride, from McGill University. He received his B.Eng. in Electrical Engineering at the University of New Brunswick.



Graduate Students

Varsha Viswanath

Varsha Viswanath
Graduate Student
 vvisw@seas.upenn.edu

Projects: PennPET Explorer, PET Image Analysis

Varsha studies the impact of extending the axial field-of-view of PET scanners past one meter for both clinical and research applications. Her research includes lesion detectability studies to understand how the increased sensitivity of such scanners will improve localization and detection of small low contrast lesions. Additionally, Varsha studies the improvement in dynamic kinetic parameter estimation made possible by such scanners. Varsha also assists with building the PennPET Explorer, coordinating and implement studies on the scanner, processing the acquired data, and analyzing the reconstructed images.

Varsha has previously worked in the Cherry group at the University of California, Davis as an undergraduate researcher studying and implementing a method to characterize depth-of-interaction of a gamma ray in a PET crystal using a phosphor coating. She has also previously worked in the imaging of dementia and aging (IDeA) lab at UC Davis to study the effect of dementia on the human brain using DTI imaging.

Varsha is 5th year PhD student in bioengineering at Penn in the HHMI Interfaces program, and she got her undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering at UC Davis.


Undergraduate Students

  • Kelly Babitz, C-SPECT
  • Ben Culver, PennPET Explorer
  • Tim McSorley, PennPET Explorer
  • Joe Shiba, PennPET Explorer
  • Lilian Stoesser, GUI development