Current Research Track Residents

Philip D. Campbell, M.D., Ph.D.

Philip D. Campbell, M.D., Ph.D.

I am a PGY4 resident focusing on the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying the human neurodevelopmental risk locus at 22q11.2. For part of my PhD research, I modeled a human neuropathy in zebrafish, gaining experience in developmental neuroscience, molecular genetics, cell biology, and animal modeling. I have clinical interests in psychosis and schizophrenia and am also interested in the molecular genetics of behavior and psychiatric disease. I am currently pursuing basic research in zebrafish with Dr. Michael Granato. 

Sheila Shanmugan, M.D., Ph.D.

Sheila Shanmugan, M.D., Ph.D.

I am a PGY3 resident on the research track, working with Dr. Ted Satterthwaite. I have always been fascinated by the brain so I majored in Biological Basis of Behavior as an undergrad at Penn. I loved Philly and stayed at Penn for my MD/PhD training. I am passionate about women's behavioral health, and during grad school, I used neuroimaging to examine how childhood adversity confers a risk for executive dysfunction during menopause. I chose to stay at Penn because I could not imagine a more warm and supportive place to continue training that also has cutting-edge neuroimaging research and clinical opportunities. 

William R. Smith M.D., Ph.D

William R. Smith M.D., Ph.D

I am a PGY3 resident on the research track. I became interested in research during my time at NIH in the Department of Bioethics. I then completed my MD training at Emory and my PhD at Notre Dame, focusing on moral and political issues in healthcare resource allocation.  I am continuing work on issues in resource allocation, but also interested in psychiatric nosology. Clinically, my chief interests are in psychosis, consultation, and in the interactions in severe, chronic mental illness and other social and economic issues in patient's lives.

Robert Seilheimer, M.D., Ph.D.

Robert Seilheimer, M.D., Ph.D.

I am a PGY2 resident on the research track and I'm interested in using neuromodulation both to investigate neural circuits underlying psychiatric disease and to treat it. I studied mathematics in college and earned a PhD in computational biology in the MSTP at Baylor College of Medicine. For my PhD research, I delineated the contributions of different cell types in the retina to the spatial and temporal processing of ganglion cells. To do this, I used multi-electrode array recordings and computational modeling. I chose Penn Psychiatry because it offers great clinical training, the opportunity to work with top-notch research mentors in psychiatry, neuroscience, and neuro-engineering, and the time to choose the right mentor, develop a project, and see it through.

Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D.

Joshua Gordon, M.D., Ph.D.

I am a PGY1 resident on the research track with an interest in population-based research and associations between inflammation, the microbiome, and psychiatric illness. My interest in combining research with clinical practice developed while working in clinical research at the Boston Children's Hospital after graduating from Tufts University. These dual interests lead me to enroll in the MD/PhD program at the University at Buffalo, where I completed my PhD in the department of epidemiology studying associations between periodontal disease, edentulism, inflammation, the oral microbiome, and risk of hypertension among participants in the Women's Health Initiative. Through the Penn research track, I look forward to continuing to develop clinical skills and apply epidemiologic methods to address research questions within the field of psychiatry.  

Kevin W. Hoffman, M.D., Ph.D.

Kevin W. Hoffman, M.D., Ph.D.

I grew up in Western Pennsylvania and first came to the Philly area to attend Haverford College, where I studied physics and chemistry. While at Haverford I developed as a scientist, but also discovered that I wanted a more direct role helping people. I continued my education in the combined MD-PhD program at Mount Sinai, where I completed my PhD in microbiology, studying how the immune system responds to neuroinvasive viruses. I came to Penn to combine my research interests with my clinical interests, including children with comorbid psychiatric and complex medical illnesses, psychosis, and the schizophrenia prodrome. Research wise I remain interested in learning how immune-brain interactions contribute to and predict disease outcomes. Outside of the clinic and lab, I’m still a kid at heart and can often be found reading the nerdiest sci-fi/fantasy books I can get ahold of as well as playing with or obsessively talking about my cats!

Dustin R. Todaro, M.D., Ph.D.

Dustin R. Todaro, M.D., Ph.D.

As a PGY1 resident on the research track, I am currently exploring the breadth of research opportunities available at Penn.  My interest in basic science research began as an undergraduate at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.  I then joined the MD/PhD program at the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans, where I completed my doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology.  My graduate training was founded in kinetic-based enzymology and focused on examining mechanistic conservation across the HECT ubiquitin ligase superfamily.  As I continue my training at Penn, I plan to pursue my research interests in molecular mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders, while cultivating my clinical interests in neuropsychiatry.


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